Page 1 of 3
1
2
3
LastLast
  1. #1
    Brewmaster Fallen Angel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lian Yu
    Posts
    1,378

    [Books] Warhammer 40k

    I've been considering getting into the 40k books once I'm finished with the Diablo books. Anything you guys can suggest?

  2. #2
    Immortal Manakin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Cambridge!
    Posts
    7,947
    I'd definitely recommend the horus heresy, the first three are fantastic to hook your attention; After them it can get a little drier for some novels (Not naming authors).

    If you want a more 40k centered realm of reading, i'd roll with the ultramarine's or space wolves/ blood angels series, or if chaos is your thing the night lords/ word bearers (The night lords were a great series to read).

    The grey knight series is rather stale, the original series was published in the late 90's iirc, but the add on fluff novels are more lively.

    It all depends on your preference here, so many chapters/ legions/ things are written about i could recommend hundreds of books (Having the majority of them).
    Quote Originally Posted by Jester Joe View Post
    Oh Manakin, have I told you lately that I love you.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGravemind View Post
    The British did not play a major role in WW2

  3. #3
    Brewmaster Fallen Angel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lian Yu
    Posts
    1,378
    I really know nothing about 40k, so any suggestion I'd probably go for. Friend of mine highly suggested Space Wolves, so maybe I'll start there.

  4. #4
    For light reading, Sandy Mitchell's Ciaphas Cain series is great start, it's basically Blackadder/Flashman in space, it's not as grimdark as most others, humor is not as forced and books "flow" really well. For quality, Dan Abnett probably writes best 40k books, Eisenhorn omnibus is widely considered the best warhammer novel(s), next to his Gaunt's Ghost series (dark but incredible military fiction). Space Wolves are written by William King, he's also a decent writer (he wrote Gotrek and Felix novels for Warhammer Fantasy, great read), Ragnar does have maybe too much plot armour but meh.
    I'd leave Horus Heresy after you're more familiar with background, different writers make it a bit schizophrenic to go through.

  5. #5
    Brewmaster Fallen Angel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lian Yu
    Posts
    1,378
    Good advice. I'll keep that in mind

  6. #6
    The Space Wolves series (Bill King, later Lee Lightner) was started around 2nd edition 40k and is a bit more light-hearted/comic-book-actiony than some of the later grim-dark offerings. They have their grittier edge in the 2 Horus Heresy novels they've been major players in (A Thousand Sons by Graham McNeil and Prospero Burns by Dan Abnett) and that's continued in The Battle of the Fang, Blood of Asaheim and Stormcaller by Chris Wraight.

    Gaunt's Ghosts (Dan Abnett - 15 novels making up 4 story arcs) is a very good starting point as it mostly deals with Imperial Guardsmen and gives a nice human perspective (although Dan Abnett does tend to make some of the threats they face a bit less dangerous than the strictly canonical lore has it). Abnett has also written the Eisenhorn trilogy (Xenos, Hereticus, Malleus) and its follow-up the Ravenor trilogy (Ravenor, Ravenor Rogue, Ravenor Returned). He's currently one book into Eisenhorn vs. Ravenor. It's worth noting that Dan Abnett's work was very influential in filling in the lore of the Imp. Guard and Inquisitors, being the foundation for a table-top RP game (Inquisitor) and one of the Guard Codices (3.5).

    Other than that, most factions will have a series or standalone book to check out. Aaron Dembski-Bowden is a fan favourite for Chaos people (and does an excellent job with Space Wolves and Grey Knights in The Emperor's Gift). Some 40k books can be surprisingly excellent, but I've also read more than my fair share of absolute stinkers.

  7. #7
    High Overlord
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    111
    Anything written by Dan Abnett, especially Gaunt's Ghosts, Eisenhorn and Ravenor are also great trilogies, chronologically Ravenor happens first, then Eisenhorn.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayuriel View Post
    Anything written by Dan Abnett, especially Gaunt's Ghosts, Eisenhorn and Ravenor are also great trilogies, chronologically Ravenor happens first, then Eisenhorn.
    Eisenhorn comes first chronologically (Ravenor served as his Interrogator before being promoted to Inquisitor).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bayuriel View Post
    Anything written by Dan Abnett, especially Gaunt's Ghosts, Eisenhorn and Ravenor are also great trilogies, chronologically Ravenor happens first, then Eisenhorn.
    What? What? No, Eisenhorn comes first.

  10. #10
    Bloodsail Admiral Helden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,054
    Gaunts Ghosts is a good intro to the series.

    Eisenhorn and Ravenor after that, from there, whatever you want, there's a bunch of series out there for 40k, both ongoing and finished, with the most popular atm being the Horus Heresy.

    Author's wise, anything by Graham McNeill, Dan Abnett, Sandy Mitchell and Aaron Dembski Bowden is pretty much a guaranteed good book. Ben Counter and James Swallow have there moments. Chris Wraight and Rob Sanders are pretty well regarded up and coming authors in the Black Library group. Nick Kyme, i've never read anything good by, and stay the hell away from anything by C.S. Goto.
    Last edited by Helden; 2014-09-05 at 04:13 PM.
    Please assume everything in the post above is sarcastic.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Helden View Post
    Gaunts Ghosts is a good intro to the series.

    Eisenhorn and Ravenor after that, from there, whatever you want, there's a bunch of series out there for 40k, both ongoing and finished, with the most popular atm being the Horus Heresy.

    Author's wise, anything by Graham McNeill, Dan Abnett, Sandy Mitchell and Aaron Dembski Bowden is pretty much a guaranteed good book. Ben Counter and James Swallow have there moments. Chris Wraight and Rob Sanders are pretty well regarded up and coming authors in the Black Library group. Nick Kyme, i've never read anything good by, and stay the hell away from anything by C.S. Goto.
    Most of these authors "own" certain factions, by which I mean the novels they write on those subjects are often considered canonical (or as close as Games Workshop allows) and either inspire or are drawn from the lore in the Rulebooks and Codices.

    Dan Abnett - The Imperial Guard and Inquisition. Also laid strong foundations for the Mechanicum with Titanicus.
    Graham McNeill - Ultramarines and the Mechanicum.
    Aaron Dembski Bowden - Word Bearers and Night Lords, Chaos fans in general love him and all his work is pretty great.
    Nick Kyme - Salamanders.
    Chris Wraight - Space Wolves, also did an excellent job with the White Scars in the Horus Heresy series.
    James Swallow - Blood Angels.

    Gav Thorpe - Eldar and Dark Angels.
    Andy Chambers - Dark Eldar.
    (Gav and Andy get their own section because they, along with Rick Priestly and Jervis Johnson, were instrumental in creating 40k).

    C.S. Goto's 40k universe is very different from everyone else's. His Craftworld book was an interesting read but his Eldar were...strange.

    William King is a classic author and his stuff is worth checking out for some good stories in a slightly older version of the 40k universe. He also has some contemporary stuff in his Macharian Crusade trilogy (which I haven't read).

    Ian Watson wrote Space Marine, the first book about Space Marines, with weird homo-erotic and sado-masochistic underover-tones. He also wrote the Inquisition War trilogy, which is mental.

  12. #12
    Depends on what part of 40k you want to learn about. Its broken down like that in a loose way. Imperial Guard (human soilders), Inquisition (Humans and demons crime mystery in a way), Space Marines, Eldar and the Mechanicum.

    I love Abnett, McNeil and Bowden as writers. I think they have the best style and story telling ability. But no one in the Black library is bad. Their writers stable is much better than Blizzards, I wouldn't even put them in the same category. Could be I've read the wrong Blizzard books and the right Black Library stuff, but I don't think that is the issue.

    The Horus heresy is great and doesn't require a lot of prior knowledge like one might think. Its a mix of writers and so far its long and unfinished so that is always a plus.

  13. #13
    Pandaren Monk ParanoiD84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,853
    Be ready to spend countless hours reading lore after your hooked.

  14. #14
    Bloodsail Admiral Helden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Dhrizzle View Post
    Most of these authors "own" certain factions, by which I mean the novels they write on those subjects are often considered canonical (or as close as Games Workshop allows) and either inspire or are drawn from the lore in the Rulebooks and Codices.

    Dan Abnett - The Imperial Guard and Inquisition. Also laid strong foundations for the Mechanicum with Titanicus.
    Graham McNeill - Ultramarines and the Mechanicum.
    Aaron Dembski Bowden - Word Bearers and Night Lords, Chaos fans in general love him and all his work is pretty great.
    Nick Kyme - Salamanders.
    Chris Wraight - Space Wolves, also did an excellent job with the White Scars in the Horus Heresy series.
    James Swallow - Blood Angels.

    Gav Thorpe - Eldar and Dark Angels.
    Andy Chambers - Dark Eldar.
    (Gav and Andy get their own section because they, along with Rick Priestly and Jervis Johnson, were instrumental in creating 40k).

    C.S. Goto's 40k universe is very different from everyone else's. His Craftworld book was an interesting read but his Eldar were...strange.

    William King is a classic author and his stuff is worth checking out for some good stories in a slightly older version of the 40k universe. He also has some contemporary stuff in his Macharian Crusade trilogy (which I haven't read).

    Ian Watson wrote Space Marine, the first book about Space Marines, with weird homo-erotic and sado-masochistic underover-tones. He also wrote the Inquisition War trilogy, which is mental.
    There's also David Annandale who wrote the latest in the Horus Heresy (decent writing, good characters, contents a bit meh). Totally know what you mean about Ian Watson, I tried reading the Inqusition War and couldn't back it through the first book.

    @OP: If you are looking for what will probably be the longest book series ever written once it's done, get started on the Horus Heresy, there's already 30 books, plus I don't even know how many short stories and the main part hasn't even started yet.

    A note on Sandy Mitchell's stuff, the Ciaphas Cain series, it's well liked among the 40k community, mainly because it is so different from most 40k books, so if you do end up reading those first, if you don't like it i'd carry on and trying something else.
    Please assume everything in the post above is sarcastic.

  15. #15

  16. #16
    Pandaren Monk Mapathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cultural Exchange House
    Posts
    1,784
    Iron Snakes by Dan Abnett

    Storm of Iron by Graham McNeill

  17. #17
    C.S. Goto

    Just joking, I dont want to be burned as heretic!
    Start with Horus Heresy.

  18. #18
    Bloodsail Admiral Zenway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    1,096
    Any books that focus mainly on Chaos or Tau?
    I've read Storm of Iron(I think that was the name) and loved it, it's refreshing to see the bad guys win sometimes.
    Thank god for Jim Sterling

  19. #19
    Pandaren Monk ParanoiD84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,853
    Quote Originally Posted by Zenway View Post
    Any books that focus mainly on Chaos or Tau?
    I've read Storm of Iron(I think that was the name) and loved it, it's refreshing to see the bad guys win sometimes.
    I think Fire Warrior is the only novel focusing on the Tau otherwise they are mostly antagonists.

    As for Chaos the Galaxy in Flames is a nice one, but it's part of the Horus Heresy serie and you can follow Horus decent into chaos.

    Night Lords serie is also good but it focuses mostly on single characters.
    Last edited by ParanoiD84; 2014-09-06 at 01:19 PM.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Zenway View Post
    Any books that focus mainly on Chaos or Tau?
    I've read Storm of Iron(I think that was the name) and loved it, it's refreshing to see the bad guys win sometimes.
    As a correction to my above list, Anthony Reynolds covers the 40k Word Bears (Aaron Dembski-Bowden covers them in the Horus Heresy) with his trilogy Dark Disciple, Dark Apostle and Dark Creed. AD-B's Night Lord's trilogy is [i]Soul Hunter[i], Blood Reaver and Void Walker. I'm not much into Chaos but one of my fallen brethren is constantly raving about those series. I can however recommend Ahriman: Exile, the first in a trilogy by John French (part 2 scheduled for January 2015).

    Fire Warrior is an okay book, it's been a long time since I read it but I seem to remember it was a decent if not brilliant read. Shadowsun by Braden Campbell is a recent novel starring the Tau as protagonists but I haven't read that one (yet) so I can't give an impression.

    Fire Caste by Peter Fehervari features the Tau strongly but not as the main protagonists. It is by far one of the most cynical takes on 40k's grim-dark future I've read and a really good read.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •