1. #1
    The Patient
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    Need some help with a few things!

    Hey there mmo-champion users i have a quick question for you all, i want to begin building computers and upgrading my current rig, so just for fun ( i have a little extra money to spend ) i wanted to build a computer with the CHEAPEST hardware on the market and i dont know were to start so if anyone can give me guidance it would be greatly appreciated thank you so much in advance!

    Edit: i want to find the cheap hardware if i can get the guidance on that, ihave a few guides for how to build them so that isnt what i need help on
    Last edited by Pacabra; 2012-05-04 at 06:26 AM.

  2. #2
    Erm, it's a little more complicated than just saying the "cheapest" components. Do you want the cheapest parts that are current? Or do you want the cheapest parts period? Do you want the cheapest "gaming" PC? Or do you want the cheapest "office" PC?

  3. #3
    The Patient
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    Sorry that i hadnt specified yes i want the cheapest parts current and it doesnt bother me if it can run games or not

  4. #4
    Not sure if you need an OS or not, but I didn't include one, just throw in Win7 64-bit for $99 if you do.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
    CPU: Intel Celeron G540 2.5GHz Dual-Core Processor ($55.99 @ Mac Mall)
    Motherboard: ECS H61H2-M2(1.0) Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($37.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill NS 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($22.99 @ Newegg)
    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: Antec 380W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($44.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $286.92
    (Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-05-04 09:43 EDT-0400)

    The 4GB of RAM and 380W PSU are both overkill, but if you wanted to throw in a cheap video card like the 7750 and bump the processor up to something like the Pentium G860 you could and you'd have yourself a very basic gaming PC.
    Last edited by noteworthynerd; 2012-05-04 at 01:43 PM.

  5. #5
    The Patient
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    Quote Originally Posted by noteworthynerd View Post
    Not sure if you need an OS or not, but I didn't include one, just throw in Win7 64-bit for $99 if you do.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
    CPU: Intel Celeron G540 2.5GHz Dual-Core Processor ($55.99 @ Mac Mall)
    Motherboard: ECS H61H2-M2(1.0) Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($37.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill NS 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($22.99 @ Newegg)
    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 320GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: Antec 380W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($44.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $286.92
    (Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-05-04 09:43 EDT-0400)

    The 4GB of RAM and 380W PSU are both overkill, but if you wanted to throw in a cheap video card like the 7750 and bump the processor up to something like the Pentium G860 you could and you'd have yourself a very basic gaming PC.
    This was extremely helpful and i do have win7 , also i know that certain hardware doesnt work with others ( this build is obviously fine) so how would i know what is compatible with each other?
    If you do not mind helping

  6. #6
    This is from lack of experience with building, so take it as you will. Anyone feel free to correct if necessary.

    The primary concerns over compatibility of modern equipment would I think be the motherboard, the CPU and the RAM.
    The motherboard will support a specific fitting or "Socket" for the CPU which will limit not only the brand but also to a narrow selection of CPUs.
    Each CPU will be described by amongst other features the number of the Socket to which it will fit.
    In the selected list above both the CPU and Motherboard utilise Socket LGA115.

    The motherboard will also support specific types of RAM.
    Most modern motherboards will support DDR3, and upto selected speeds.
    The description or manual for the motherboard should tell you what it supports, in the above being DDR3 1333/1066.

    The power requirements of the PSU I am not so sure about working out, so I can't really say anything there.
    The format or size of the motherboard will influence the size of the case required, in this case MicroATX.

  7. #7
    ComputerNerd pretty much covered everything. The big thing to make sure that the motherboard socket matches your CPU socket, in this case, LGA 1155.

    As for determining the PSU size: I dunno how to explain it, it's just something that you pick up after enough builds. It's also where most "novices" make the biggest mistake, either buying one that doesn't have enough wattage or has way too much wattage, and/or is terrible quality. Another place novices tend to mess up is CPU choice, a lot of the time they think that the CPU with the biggest number or the most cores is the best, and that's not the case.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for that help both of you, now i have another question if you guys don mind answering it, noteworthynerd you said something about the more cores you have doesnt mean its the best cpu, can you explain this and sorry if this is a lot of questions i just really want to get into building computers and being familar with them, so if your getting annoyed with me i understand, and if you are so i dont have to ask a million questions can you point out a guide to me, and i guess ill have to make mistakes to learn ( i think?) thanks again.

  9. #9
    A lot of people make the mistake of assuming a 6-core CPU is automatically better than a 4-core CPU, and that an 8-core CPU (or a 4-core CPU with hyperthreading) is the best possible.

    The simple fact is, the number of cores is of little consequence in a gaming PC, because most games don't heavily utilize more than 2 or 3 cores (and certainly no more than 4).

    It's all about the "architecture" of the CPU.

    To illustrate my point, here's a comparison of the Intel i5 2500K (a quad core CPU) vs the AMD FX-8150 (an eight core CPU). As you can see, the 2500K absolutely smashes the 8150 in most tests.

  10. #10
    The Patient
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    Quote Originally Posted by noteworthynerd View Post
    A lot of people make the mistake of assuming a 6-core CPU is automatically better than a 4-core CPU, and that an 8-core CPU (or a 4-core CPU with hyperthreading) is the best possible.

    The simple fact is, the number of cores is of little consequence in a gaming PC, because most games don't heavily utilize more than 2 or 3 cores (and certainly no more than 4).

    It's all about the "architecture" of the CPU.

    To illustrate my point, here's a comparison of the Intel i5 2500K (a quad core CPU) vs the AMD FX-8150 (an eight core CPU). As you can see, the 2500K absolutely smashes the 8150 in most tests.
    I see and now i understand a bit more, thats always nice to know and im sure will help in the long run, throughout the day ive been searching a few things about computers such as what heatsink is etc. and i must say this is one of those few times were i am having a lot of fun learning about things and now that i have your guidance on my first custom pc i look forward to building a lot of other pcs and experimenting. I really appreciate the help ive been given so far!

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