Thread: Weight Loss

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  1. #41
    High Overlord Landfall's Avatar
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    Well, I'm looking at joining the gym again.
    I guess i can probably find some time, i mean i drive past it on the way home everyday anyway...So whats an extra hour or so on my way home!

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall View Post
    Well, I'm looking at joining the gym again.
    I guess i can probably find some time, i mean i drive past it on the way home everyday anyway...So whats an extra hour or so on my way home!
    You dont need breakfast.
    Not having breakfast wont impact anything.
    It can actually help skipping it.
    And yeah you need more LEAN proteins and maybe start counting your calories.
    Change takes time.
    If you do this for 3 months thinking you'll swell out of your shirt, then you my friend should reconsider everything.
    Also remember that one beer ( typical 50 cl) has around 200 calories.
    Eat more greens, broccoli, lettuce, peas.
    More chicken, tuna, salmon, almondsd ( all nuts are high in calorie so keep that in mind ) etc.

    I really hope you follow some advice rather than read what we have to say and do the complete opposite.

    And you should only stay in the Gym for 1 hour or so anyway.
    Also dont bother with the post workout shit, you can wait a good few hours, and that might actually help you.

  3. #43
    High Overlord Cosima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall View Post
    Well, I'm looking at joining the gym again.
    I guess i can probably find some time, i mean i drive past it on the way home everyday anyway...So whats an extra hour or so on my way home!
    Going to the gym won't help you at all if you keep eating the same things you eat now. It would be like giving my workout schedule to a person eating a standard diet; their body would be exhausted due to lack of nutrition within a matter of days. Read what I wrote on page two.
    Cyclist. 175cm, 59kg. I generally spend 30% of my time working out, 40% on my education, 5% eating, and 25% doing other things.

    "Is man one of God’s blunders? Or is God one of man’s blunders?"

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall View Post
    then a couple of beers
    That could be your problem. Hop is known to be estrogenic (i.e. acts like female hormons, which can cause man boobs).
    And while it is not clear on whether or not that is still the case once the hop is transformed into beer, cutting down to one beer a day will definitely benefit your health. And maybe your man boobs.

    Finally, I agree with other that your diet is horrible. Eat just as much but healthy and you should start looking better.

    Exercise can also help shape your body in a better way. And no need for a gym membership, you can exercise just fine at home, but the gym membership could help motivate you (a.k.a I've spend money on it, so I will use it.) You can also try Fitocracy.com as a motivator (the site allows you to earn XP from exercise and then "level up" just like a video game). But the best advice for exercise is to find a physical activity they YOU find pleasant, whatever that might be.

  5. #45
    You could always count calories even tho it's not necessary. But it does work. Take the weight you want to be and just add a zero to it. Example, if you want to be 150lbs then stick to a 1500 calorie diet. If you limit your calories, eat healthy, and run 30 minutes a day you'll lose weight faster than you think.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Kalis View Post
    Doesn't your body store more fat unless you eat at regular intervals, or is that some bs my gf told me?

    No, but it stores more fat if you starve yourself. A huge difference, though.



    Anyway, you really just need exercise. If you exercise every other day your body burns excessive fat all the time (your body is active for many hours even after the exercise).

    Running uphill for 30 minutes four days a week should be enough for a noticable difference.
    Last edited by Fojos; 2012-08-07 at 12:25 AM.

  7. #47
    Blademaster bigjoey's Avatar
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    The whole "I do not have time thing" is not going to fly. You need to begin weight training. Everyone has time in their lives for 30-45 min in the gym. There is no quick fix to the problem you are addressing. You need to focus and commit to a lifestyle change and weight training routine. Saying you don't have time to go to the gym four days a week for 30 min is just a silly excuse.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Landfall View Post
    Well pretty much what i eat at the moment is:

    No breakfast
    2 apples and a bottle of water for lunch
    general family dinner
    an icecream
    then a couple of beers

    So if i cut out the icecream and not have as much dinner then i'll be at a pretty decent deficit
    This is incredibly unhealthy... you need to add more vegetables and protein to your diet. Plus, you really need to start eating breakfast and a REAL lunch.

  9. #49
    Brewmaster
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    You need to hit the gym again!

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by skullduggery View Post
    What do you guys think about running on an empty stomach for weight loss? I hear people saying that since you have nothing in your stomach your body goes right for the fat for energy. But others tell me it's bad for you and your body instead uses your muscles. Anyone have a clue on this? (backing up what you say with research links would be awesome)
    Exercising in the fasted state does, indeed, shift the fuel utilization curve towards fatty acid oxidation as your postprandial respiratory quotient drops as a function of time.1 However, due to decreased muscle and liver glycogen levels following an overnight fast, your rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during this type of exercise will most likely be increased (i.e., it will seem harder to run in a fasted state compared to the same training session performed after breakfast or lunch). Due to a higher RPE during fasted-state endurance training, individuals exercising ad libitum might not be able or willing to complete a sufficiently challenging training session and, therefore, might derive a lesser benefit from this type of training (i.e., it's harder to do, so you'll need to push yourself a little bit more to get the same stimulus and/or calorie burn from fed-state training). Some preliminary evidence is suggesting that this type of fasted-state training may be used as an ergogenic training method for endurance athletes, as it up-regulates fat-handling genes and enzymes and may even spare glycogen during fed-state training/competitions (whether or not this is beneficial for fat loss remains to be seen).2 Endurance training during the fed-state with ample muscle glycogen will enable the trainee to exercise at a higher intensity for a longer duration of time and, as a result, not only expend more energy during the training session, but simultaneously achieve greater improvements in VO2 max (i.e., if you can exercise harder and longer, you'll burn more energy and you'll get more fit – not only that, but it will feel easier than if you did all your training fasted). While it is true that training at a higher intensity relies, relatively speaking, more on carbohydrate oxidation than on fat oxidation, the absolute amount of fat oxidized during a high intensity endurance training session (as well as the overall energy expenditure of the session), will be greater.

    Since energy deficits are required to "lose weight," generally speaking, the greater the energy deficit you can achieve, the greater your fat loss will be (to a degree). Therefore, I usually advise individuals to train after they've eaten – they'll be able to work out longer, harder, and with less perceived fatigue. This not only helps them burn more energy, but it makes the exercise more enjoyable than it otherwise would be, increasing their adherence to the exercise program / lifestyle (very good in the long term). This recommendation is for the general population – if you are already lean (like 10% body fat or less) and trying to get really, really lean (like single digit body fat percentages) while maintaining all of your muscle, you might want to consider very low intensity fasted state jogging (or even just brisk uphill walking) before breakfast. The leaner you are, the more weird things you have to do to your body to "trick" the fat off (being lean and muscular is not advantageous to the body, it's actually a metabolic liability – muscle requires lots of energy to maintain and food is VERY scarce, or so our body thinks...). One such way of forcing the body to burn fat directly is low-intensity, steady-state, fasted cardiovascular exercise. Due to lowered glycogen levels, however, proteolysis (protein breakdown in order to use amino acids as fuel) during this type of exercise is slightly increased, but really isn't a problem unless you're doing high-intensity, long-duration fasted cardio (like 70-85% VO2 max for 60-90 minutes first thing in the morning – that's just stupid anyways and really sucks balls. Unless you love that crap or are obese or are an elite athlete trying to up-regulate citrate synthase or something, skip it.)

    TL;DR: For standard weight loss for people at "average" body fat percentages, eat first, then do cardio. If you're lean and muscular and trying to get even leaner, LISS fasted cardio (or intermittent fasting, or maybe even both).



    References

    1. http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v2.../0802991a.html
    2. http://jap.physiology.org/content/104/4/1045.long



    Oh yea, and to the OP. I saw your pics. Don't try to lose weight. Just start lifting and eating more. You'll notice improvements within a few weeks.

  11. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr-1337 View Post
    Exercising in the fasted state does, indeed, shift the fuel utilization curve towards fatty acid oxidation as your postprandial respiratory quotient drops as a function of time.1 However, due to decreased muscle and liver glycogen levels following an overnight fast, your rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during this type of exercise will most likely be increased (i.e., it will seem harder to run in a fasted state compared to the same training session performed after breakfast or lunch). Due to a higher RPE during fasted-state endurance training, individuals exercising ad libitum might not be able or willing to complete a sufficiently challenging training session and, therefore, might derive a lesser benefit from this type of training (i.e., it's harder to do, so you'll need to push yourself a little bit more to get the same stimulus and/or calorie burn from fed-state training). Some preliminary evidence is suggesting that this type of fasted-state training may be used as an ergogenic training method for endurance athletes, as it up-regulates fat-handling genes and enzymes and may even spare glycogen during fed-state training/competitions (whether or not this is beneficial for fat loss remains to be seen).2 Endurance training during the fed-state with ample muscle glycogen will enable the trainee to exercise at a higher intensity for a longer duration of time and, as a result, not only expend more energy during the training session, but simultaneously achieve greater improvements in VO2 max (i.e., if you can exercise harder and longer, you'll burn more energy and you'll get more fit – not only that, but it will feel easier than if you did all your training fasted). While it is true that training at a higher intensity relies, relatively speaking, more on carbohydrate oxidation than on fat oxidation, the absolute amount of fat oxidized during a high intensity endurance training session (as well as the overall energy expenditure of the session), will be greater.

    Since energy deficits are required to "lose weight," generally speaking, the greater the energy deficit you can achieve, the greater your fat loss will be (to a degree). Therefore, I usually advise individuals to train after they've eaten – they'll be able to work out longer, harder, and with less perceived fatigue. This not only helps them burn more energy, but it makes the exercise more enjoyable than it otherwise would be, increasing their adherence to the exercise program / lifestyle (very good in the long term). This recommendation is for the general population – if you are already lean (like 10% body fat or less) and trying to get really, really lean (like single digit body fat percentages) while maintaining all of your muscle, you might want to consider very low intensity fasted state jogging (or even just brisk uphill walking) before breakfast. The leaner you are, the more weird things you have to do to your body to "trick" the fat off (being lean and muscular is not advantageous to the body, it's actually a metabolic liability – muscle requires lots of energy to maintain and food is VERY scarce, or so our body thinks...). One such way of forcing the body to burn fat directly is low-intensity, steady-state, fasted cardiovascular exercise. Due to lowered glycogen levels, however, proteolysis (protein breakdown in order to use amino acids as fuel) during this type of exercise is slightly increased, but really isn't a problem unless you're doing high-intensity, long-duration fasted cardio (like 70-85% VO2 max for 60-90 minutes first thing in the morning – that's just stupid anyways and really sucks balls. Unless you love that crap or are obese or are an elite athlete trying to up-regulate citrate synthase or something, skip it.)

    TL;DR: For standard weight loss for people at "average" body fat percentages, eat first, then do cardio. If you're lean and muscular and trying to get even leaner, LISS fasted cardio (or intermittent fasting, or maybe even both).



    References

    1. http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v2.../0802991a.html
    2. http://jap.physiology.org/content/104/4/1045.long



    Oh yea, and to the OP. I saw your pics. Don't try to lose weight. Just start lifting and eating more. You'll notice improvements within a few weeks.
    Wow. Thanks for the well thought out and written answer. This helps me a lot.
    edit: So for average fatties, eat and then work out. For muscular people, fast workout. What about overweight and or obese people? Do they fast workout or eat then workout?
    Last edited by skullduggery; 2012-08-08 at 07:02 AM.

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by skullduggery View Post
    Wow. Thanks for the well thought out and written answer. This helps me a lot.
    edit: So for average fatties, eat and then work out. For muscular people, fast workout. What about overweight and or obese people? Do they fast workout or eat then workout?
    Id say try it for yourself, if you like training fasted then do that, but if you dont have the energy for it, id eat an hour - 2 hours before.

  13. #53
    High Overlord Cosima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skullduggery View Post
    So for average fatties, eat and then work out. For muscular people, fast workout.
    How did you come to that conclusion? Dr-1337 is simply explaining why people who are already in good shape and enjoy working out would benefit from doing a quick cardio workout before breakfast. It's not like athletes make sure not to eat for say 10 hours before their main workouts. I would never ever do my weekly full-body strenght program, or any of my 4-5 weekly 120-150 min cardio sessions for that matter, before breakfast. However 30-45 min of cardio, especially jogging, I actually prefer to do before breakfast.

    And no offense to Dr-1337, his post was well written and informative, but I highly disagree with you (you being skulldruggery) when you say "it helped me a lot". What Dr-1337 is talking about stretches far beyond the average gymmer, and simply knowing that a lean person can have great benefits from running on an emply stomach doesn't help you much when all you eat on a daily basis are two apples and a plate of dinner, in addition to a couple of beers.

    If you want to, you can PM me saying exactly what you want to achieve, and then I will PM you back saying exactly what you need to do in order to reach your goal.
    Cyclist. 175cm, 59kg. I generally spend 30% of my time working out, 40% on my education, 5% eating, and 25% doing other things.

    "Is man one of God’s blunders? Or is God one of man’s blunders?"

  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosima View Post
    How did you come to that conclusion? Dr-1337 is simply explaining why people who are already in good shape and enjoy working out would benefit from doing a quick cardio workout before breakfast. It's not like athletes make sure not to eat for say 10 hours before their main workouts. I would never ever do my weekly full-body strenght program, or any of my 4-5 weekly 120-150 min cardio sessions for that matter, before breakfast. However 30-45 min of cardio, especially jogging, I actually prefer to do before breakfast.

    And no offense to Dr-1337, his post was well written and informative, but I highly disagree with you (you being skulldruggery) when you say "it helped me a lot". What Dr-1337 is talking about stretches far beyond the average gymmer, and simply knowing that a lean person can have great benefits from running on an emply stomach doesn't help you much when all you eat on a daily basis are two apples and a plate of dinner, in addition to a couple of beers.

    If you want to, you can PM me saying exactly what you want to achieve, and then I will PM you back saying exactly what you need to do in order to reach your goal.
    Skullduggery wasnt the one that had the fucked up diet :P

  15. #55
    High Overlord Cosima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harzaka View Post
    Skullduggery wasnt the one that had the fucked up diet :P
    In that case, my apologies.
    Cyclist. 175cm, 59kg. I generally spend 30% of my time working out, 40% on my education, 5% eating, and 25% doing other things.

    "Is man one of God’s blunders? Or is God one of man’s blunders?"

  16. #56
    Low carb dieting and an hour long cardio and weight training workout every day could help you lose that fat and tone your muscles. Cut out all kinds of starchy, fatty carbs from your diet and focus on healthy, fibrous protein-rich foods.

  17. #57
    DO NOT LOOSE WEIGHT! You're perfectly weighted for your height. You wanna look fit? Then work out dude... that's it.

  18. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Minusmagier View Post
    DO NOT LOOSE WEIGHT! You're perfectly weighted for your height. You wanna look fit? Then work out dude... that's it.
    I think hes about 20-40 lbs underweight for his height and he has like 15-18% body fat. He needs tow workout for 5-6 years and gain a shit ton of muscle to look good.

    To OP: I am pretty sure you do not have man boobs (some fat above the chest is natural at your body fat percentage and, frankly, you really don't have much, I mean, you have fat on your lower stomach as well for that matter). You need to gain muscle mass and lose fat over the next few years until you are at least 11-13 stone and then you will have the physique that you are wanting.

    Oh, btw, while it could just be from the way you were taking the photos, it looks like your shoulders are rolled forward. This occurs when your chest muscles are stronger than your back muscles and is poor posture. If you do nothing but work your chest, your shoulders will continue to migrate forward and you will look unbalanced and eventually develop back pain.
    Last edited by jbhasban; 2012-10-07 at 02:26 PM.

  19. #59
    I think exercise is the best way to reduce your weight. You can also loss your weight by taking medicine but you have to take medicine carefully. Before taking medicine you should consult with the doctor.

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