Thread: Losing Weight

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  1. #41
    If you take plenty of crystal Meth & smoke crack, you'll lose plenty of weight. The only downfall is that you'll end up dead or addicted & living off the street.
    If you don't want that, then just a proper diet & exercise is needed. No trainer needed, trainers are just for the weak people that can't motivate themselves and too lazy to do their own research or pick up a magazine or two for tips. Long and short of it, eat less, exercise more.

  2. #42
    I got into body-building/lifting on the complete opposite end of the spectrum. I was a skinny kid who wanted to look better & become bigger, an ectomorph or (hard gainer). My "diet" consists of well over 5,500 calories a day with 1.25-1.5g/protein per body lb a day. I've been able to accomplish amazing results in a little over a year so far. Now .. your body-type called an Endomorph while, I'm sure very frustrating to deal with, is actually not a bad place to be in when you're starting your journey to a better body!

    I'm stating this now, because I think, you like most people might be taking a much slower road to success in where you'll focus heavy on your calorie intake and cardio amount and steer away from an avenue that will not only let you lose weight, but increase your strength and muscle mass! So when you hit your goal of 210 (not sure how tall you are?) you'll also look great, feel great & move mountains!

    I'd strongly recommend considering adding bodybuilding into your weight-loss plan. With proper "diet", supplementation, exercise & rest you'll see solid results within a year. And to be honest, you'll only have to do 1/2 of the cardio and be able to do the more enjoyable things while obtaining the same results!


    Are any pills effective? Not miracle weight loss pills, but vitamins and other kinds.

    There are many fat-burners that can help aid the process, but of course, there's no miracle pills. Some of them have appetite suppressors in them if you feel that's needed. Honestly, i'd steer clear of them. But in terms of other supplements there a tons! BCAAs, Creatine (YES you can lose weight and take Creatine), Proteins (Casein, Soy & Whey), Fish Oils, et cetra!


    How many calories should I try to deficit every day from the calories I need to maintain my weight, how much of this should come from exercise?

    Everything I know is based on the other end of the spectrum but i'd imagine it's relatively similar for the endomorphs. If you eat clean protein meals (smaller, 5-6 times/day) you will be fine. You should still be eating good amounts of food a day to supply your muscles and body with the nutrients and energy it needs throughout the day and throughout your exercises. Clean protein meals such as chicken, tuna, salmon, and the like - go as natural as you can with the foods and limit the toppings you put on.

    Currently, I plan to drop over 120 pounds, I am 330 pounds and want to be 210 when I finish, how long is an acceptable goal?

    Usually, you should always set shorter goals that are attainable. Like i'd really like to see 5lbs in a month, or whatever it may be. You'll usually smash your own goals and you'll feel great. But make them reasonable, this WILL take time - but it WILL work, if you put the work in. The great thing of the healthier lifestyle is ... that, unlike many things in life, if you put the work in, you WILL get results. Stick to it, keep your head up, and after awhile it's not even a chore. Going to the gym, running, whatever will be something you look FORWARD to everyday I kid you not.

    I was thinking original oatmeal for breakfast most of the time, some kind of sandwich for lunch, and some kind of meal involving chicken breast for dinner. Is eating the same exact meals every day inherently bad?

    Not really, no. Oatmeal's a nice breakfast and you can make it tolerable with adding some fruit and cinnamon! Egg whites can be a good way to go as well, or even some healthy pancake meals. Try to change it up every few weeks to make it tolerable haha. I did oatmeal for near 5months every morning and now I can't stand the stuff. Sandwiches are always a great choice IF you buy the correct stuff. Low sodium turkey (Boars Head makes a good one) offers a lot of protein with a small amount of fat. Some light mayonaise for flavor, and other toppings on natural bread (Arnold's bread is a good choice if ya got it). And dinner yeah, change it up! Chicken with spinach and brown rice, Tuna steaks, Salmon - be creative! There's TONS of delicious healthy recipes out there.

    But honestly, don't limit yourself to 3 meals a day. You can do smaller portions of equal amounts of food and you'll still obtain your goals.
    Chobani Yogurts in between meals to start until ya get a real plan! Tons of protein, most have 0 fat, and they taste pretty good!

    -

    I don't know if this is the avenue you're looking to take, and i'm by no means a personal trainer. But I was a skinny kid who made leaps and bounds and now I feel great about my body and myself and i'd really like to help ANYONE on the same path. If you have any other questions or want help with exercises, ideas, or whatever ... feel free to message me here.
    Water flavoring packets - bad?

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by The William View Post
    I got into body-building/lifting on the complete opposite end of the spectrum. I was a skinny kid who wanted to look better & become bigger, an ectomorph or (hard gainer). My "diet" consists of well over 5,500 calories a day with 1.25-1.5g/protein per body lb a day. I've been able to accomplish amazing results in a little over a year so far. Now .. your body-type called an Endomorph while, I'm sure very frustrating to deal with, is actually not a bad place to be in when you're starting your journey to a better body!

    I'm stating this now, because I think, you like most people might be taking a much slower road to success in where you'll focus heavy on your calorie intake and cardio amount and steer away from an avenue that will not only let you lose weight, but increase your strength and muscle mass! So when you hit your goal of 210 (not sure how tall you are?) you'll also look great, feel great & move mountains!

    I'd strongly recommend considering adding bodybuilding into your weight-loss plan. With proper "diet", supplementation, exercise & rest you'll see solid results within a year. And to be honest, you'll only have to do 1/2 of the cardio and be able to do the more enjoyable things while obtaining the same results!


    Are any pills effective? Not miracle weight loss pills, but vitamins and other kinds.

    There are many fat-burners that can help aid the process, but of course, there's no miracle pills. Some of them have appetite suppressors in them if you feel that's needed. Honestly, i'd steer clear of them. But in terms of other supplements there a tons! BCAAs, Creatine (YES you can lose weight and take Creatine), Proteins (Casein, Soy & Whey), Fish Oils, et cetra!


    How many calories should I try to deficit every day from the calories I need to maintain my weight, how much of this should come from exercise?

    Everything I know is based on the other end of the spectrum but i'd imagine it's relatively similar for the endomorphs. If you eat clean protein meals (smaller, 5-6 times/day) you will be fine. You should still be eating good amounts of food a day to supply your muscles and body with the nutrients and energy it needs throughout the day and throughout your exercises. Clean protein meals such as chicken, tuna, salmon, and the like - go as natural as you can with the foods and limit the toppings you put on.

    Currently, I plan to drop over 120 pounds, I am 330 pounds and want to be 210 when I finish, how long is an acceptable goal?

    Usually, you should always set shorter goals that are attainable. Like i'd really like to see 5lbs in a month, or whatever it may be. You'll usually smash your own goals and you'll feel great. But make them reasonable, this WILL take time - but it WILL work, if you put the work in. The great thing of the healthier lifestyle is ... that, unlike many things in life, if you put the work in, you WILL get results. Stick to it, keep your head up, and after awhile it's not even a chore. Going to the gym, running, whatever will be something you look FORWARD to everyday I kid you not.

    I was thinking original oatmeal for breakfast most of the time, some kind of sandwich for lunch, and some kind of meal involving chicken breast for dinner. Is eating the same exact meals every day inherently bad?

    Not really, no. Oatmeal's a nice breakfast and you can make it tolerable with adding some fruit and cinnamon! Egg whites can be a good way to go as well, or even some healthy pancake meals. Try to change it up every few weeks to make it tolerable haha. I did oatmeal for near 5months every morning and now I can't stand the stuff. Sandwiches are always a great choice IF you buy the correct stuff. Low sodium turkey (Boars Head makes a good one) offers a lot of protein with a small amount of fat. Some light mayonaise for flavor, and other toppings on natural bread (Arnold's bread is a good choice if ya got it). And dinner yeah, change it up! Chicken with spinach and brown rice, Tuna steaks, Salmon - be creative! There's TONS of delicious healthy recipes out there.

    But honestly, don't limit yourself to 3 meals a day. You can do smaller portions of equal amounts of food and you'll still obtain your goals.
    Chobani Yogurts in between meals to start until ya get a real plan! Tons of protein, most have 0 fat, and they taste pretty good!

    -

    I don't know if this is the avenue you're looking to take, and i'm by no means a personal trainer. But I was a skinny kid who made leaps and bounds and now I feel great about my body and myself and i'd really like to help ANYONE on the same path. If you have any other questions or want help with exercises, ideas, or whatever ... feel free to message me here.
    Water flavoring packets - bad?
    He's not on the same path. He's overweight, you're genetically underweight. The things you do and the foods you eat will not work for him.

  4. #44
    Cut out high sugar/high salt foods when you can, and start walking each day. Everyone I know that tries to lose weight always worry about diet and changing up all their foods and they continuously fail at losing the weight and keeping it off. You don't need to eat special foods to lose weight and get in shape. You need to cut out the unnecessary calories you are eatting each week and get more exercise. Stop eatting fat foods, stop buying chocolate bars, stop drinking sugar rich pops. Most of all, find an area close to home that you can walk. Don't go somewhere you need to drive to for exercise, that's always a good way to fail to continue doing it.

    Also, don't expect to lose it fast. Losing a lot of weight fast isn't normal, you didn't gain it all fast, you shouldn't expect to lose it all fast. I lost 45lbs over the span of about 6 months just walking almost every day and barely adjusting my diet at all. I cut out fast food and chocolate and tried not to sit around as much. I'm still lazy most of the time, i still eat pizzas and food I enjoy and I feel a lot better.

  5. #45
    I used to weigh around 230lbs. I'm a pinch under 6 foot tall and of average build. After starting my new job I got down to around 190lbs within around 4 months.
    I can say with absolute confidence this was solely down to physical activity (my job is fairly physically intensive, but not overly so. Some heavy lifting, on my feet 10 hours a day with lots of walking around)
    When I was at my heaviest I ate a fairly carb heavy diet and maybe consumed around 2500-3000 calories per day on average. However I had VERY little physical exercise so the weight slowly piled on.
    Since my new job began I regularly consume up to 3500 calories daily but I'm maintaining a fairly ideal weight for my stature and i haven't changed what I eat at all really. I still love eating pizza and drinking beer.
    Obviously limiting your calorie intake will make you lose weight, but it's an extremely difficult thing to do long-term because you'll always feel hungry, tempting you to gorge when you do decide to eat and basically reversing any attempt you've made to lose weight.
    By FAR the best way, in my opinion is to become more active. If you drive, choose to walk to your destination instead if it would take less than an hour, or buy a bike. It'll save you a crapload of gas money and get you fitter at the same time. You don't need to join a gym, simply walking a couple of miles a day will make a massive difference after a few weeks.
    Of course dietary-wise there are some things you could try too. Go grocery shopping just after you've eaten a meal. If you shop when hungry, you're far more likely to buy junk you don't need based on the fact you've got an appetite. If you do have trouble with snacking a lot, try to cut down on your carbs a little and replace it with protein. Carbs produce sugars that feel rewarding for a short time but leave your body craving for more. Cheese has a very similar chemical, so try to avoid adding cheese to stuff or buying overly cheesy foods.

    But yeah, overall the most effective way to lose weight is to increase your physical activity. You'll feel healthier without having to feel hungry and it's completely free.

    Diet aids like pills and so on are cheating in my opinion and have absolutely no benefit to your physical health apart from the weight loss and should only be used by the tiny percentage of people that have a real psychological over-eating issue and aren't just lazy/greedy (no offence intended)

  6. #46
    * Start out slow by noting down whatever you eat. Use a nutritional chart to calculate you daily calorie intake.

    *Input your Data in this website to find out how many calories you need to maintain your current weight (http://www.caloriecontrol.org/health...ool-kit/weight -maintenance-calculator-men)

    * That number tells you the approximate amount of calories you burn just by living

    * Subtract that number from your daily calorie intake

    * The resultant number will provide you without your net calorie gain/loss

    * A loss of 3500 calories results in a loss of 1 pound

    * Start by exercising slowly; you can start by walking for half hour initially, and then increasing it to an hour after you feel comfortable

    * Lower your food intake to a comfortable level in which you don't feel too hungry and not stuffed

    * Do not put unhealthy snacks in the fridge; remove all soda, chips, cookies and replace them all with healthier alternatives such as fruits, juices, lean meats (fish, lean cut beef etc...)

    * Since your current weight is quite high, you can safely lose 4-5 pounds a week, but try to lower this amount to 2-3 pounds a week once you're in the 200s.

    * Remember losing water weight is just temporary; don't get too excited or too disappointed if you lose or gain weight too quickly

    * Remain well hydrated to avoid the situation mentioned directly above (drink more than half a gallon of water daily, more if your exercising)

    * Remain vigilante and consistent; you may encounter certain plateaus in your weight loss, but constant effort will break through these plateaus

    Best of luck in your difficult but a highlyl rewarding journey

  7. #47
    Immortal Guru Laghima's Avatar
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    Don't over think it, I did that with females back when I was younger and when you over think something, it ruins your ability to do something.

    You honestly just need to go for a short run and do it everyday, now it could just be around the block considering you are around 330 but that's all... I'm going to say it straight, get out there and get running.
    You've probably never heard of him.

  8. #48
    In order to lose weight, you have to burn more calories than your intaking. So that means you have to EXERCISE. someonesaid p90x, and thats really your best bet, not only does it push you but you'll put on effective muscle weight. Need good nutrition though, thats 75% of your weight loss/muscle gain. You said oatmeal which is great, you can add fruit in it to add more flavor. Soy Milk instead of dairy milk is also good, intake more fruits and vegetables because they are low in calories and no fats. Eat protein after your workout and consistently: fish, ground beef, tuna, chicken, even peanuts/almonds. Drink lots of water, try not to flavor it because that stuff can affect your hormones. Bananas, berries, broccoli, carrots, sweet potatoes, grains (oatmeal, brown rice, whole grain pasta). Just be committed and prepare to work your ass off if you want the results. Macro Nutrients = Fats, Carbs, Protein. Always aim for 60g of healthy fats = avocado, peantus/almonds, olive oil (doesnt have to be precise 60g, but you can use a chart to help you out.) Carbs = Brown Rice, Sweet Potato, Whole Grain Pasta, Oatmeal, Whole Grain Breads, these are SLOW/COMPLEX carbs which are better than white rice, white pasta, white potatoes cuz those go through your body like toothpaste. Plus they have Fiber which is important as well. Protein = Fish, Beef, Chicken, Nuts, Tuna, Salmon, Sardines (when I dont hav emoney I got to sardines lol). Hope it helps and do your best and forget the rest! lol

  9. #49
    I would recommend trying to cut out most carbs of your diet and instead eat more food rich in fat (Low Carb High Fat) and with this start to do regular exercise that you enjoy, don't go out to hard with the excercise you'll just get burned out, ease into it instead.

    Watch this youtube video, it's very interesting when it comes to how we eat and should be eating. You can also find alot of interviews with other prominent people in this field on his channel here.


  10. #50
    There's a lag between when you are full and when you body feels satisfied, so eat slowly and drink plenty of water.

  11. #51
    A couple of years ago I was 240 lbs, my ideal weight for my height is between 170-185. During my first attempt at weight loss I managed to drop 30 lbs in a couple months, but it was exhausting. So when life became a little stressful I said screw it. Which let to me dieting on and off for about a year, finally realizing I need to change my lifestyle when I was 250 lbs about 18 months ago.

    Right now I weigh 180 lbs of relatively good weight and have very little trouble watching what I eat. I used to wolf down mountains of crap and now the very prospect disgusts me more often than not. Here is what I suggest outside of the healthy eating and exercise norm.

    - Start slow, it's a journey not a race.
    - Don't set very long term goals like "I want to lose 120 lbs in a year". Go month to month, it's far more encouraging and rewarding; and it promotes more self-control.
    - Drink tons of water all day until your cravings seriously diminish. Avoid salt and refined sugar like the plague, once you start you're screwed.
    - Take a large dose of Omega 3 daily, tons of benefits particularly for people new to the gym.
    - Lastly exercise and EXERCISE more. My biggest mistake the 1st few months was skipping often, it boosts your mood, confidence, and quells ungodly urges to eat crap.

    Thats about it.

    The grass is really greener on the other side.
    "Just when I thought I was out... they pull me back in!"

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Harzaka View Post
    Again, wrong.
    It is calorie in calorie out. Carbs dont matter.
    Ignoring the carb debate, the first part of your statement is utter crap, but I'll give you the benefit if the doubt that it was an emotional response to disagreeing with low carb diets.

    Calories are not all made equal. I'm sure anyone with even the slightest idea about healthy eating could see that. If you get put on a 1500 calorie diet, by that logic you could simply eat 1500 calls of fried chicken and chips a day and have success. Calories are a very archaic method of measuring energy because our bodies treat different foods in a variety of ways.

    But for the record, carbs do matter, maybe not for everyone, but for a lot of us they do. When I got fat after tearing my ACL and shattering my arm, no matter how strict I calorie counted, or how hard I trained, my weight loss was minimal.... To the point of being negligible. After doing some reading and talking to a nutritionist about each foods role in our diet, I made up my own mind about carbs. The weight came off, stayed off, and I felt great.

    Now, I know a lot of people have issues with low carb diets simply because they became a 'fad', they also mistake them for very low carb or even no carb diets, which is wrong. My Diet still had plenty of carbs, they still made up about 20-30% of my daily calories. But I only ate good carbs, meaning most came from fresh veggies. I eliminated bread, pasta, rice & spuds entirely because I didn't need them, and my body didn't need them. Not only did I lose the weight, but I stopped getting sleepy after meals (especially lunch) and never felt overly hungry.

    That's my own personal experience. I was never morbidly obese, and spent most of my life relatively fit. I lost 25kg's over a year to return to to my original weight (18 months when you factor in the time I spent with no results before going low carb).

    There's plenty of other people with success stories from reducing carbs who previously struggled with weight loss. It might not work for everybody, but you can't make silly statements like its only calories in / out that counts when that's clearly not the case for many of us.

  13. #53
    The Patient
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidA View Post
    P90X It's hard and it works.
    i one up you and say TapoutXT, i was 240 when i started 90 days ago, yesterday was my final day and i weighed in at 196.5, yeah... great plan for eating, and exercise only 45 minutes a day on avg.

    ---------- Post added 2012-11-11 at 06:13 PM ----------

    Also when it comes to carbs, your body will consume all the carbs you eat, and after than itll start using your fat for energy, essentially burning off fat.

  14. #54
    i will just stick to vege

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaxsz View Post
    Hilariously false. A good idea in theory (I will agree with the law of thermodynamics here) but it isn't nearly that simple. This is setting people up to fail.

    The calories that go in greatly effect both the amount that go "out" and the type of body mass that goes "out" in this equation. The type of calories that go in also greatly effect a persons hunger and satiety, all crucial to any long term success with weight loss.

    A person eating 1500 calories a day of meat and vegetables for a year will not look the same as that identical person eating 1500 calories a day for a year of refined carbs. Pretending that they would is just stupid and makes you look foolish, and you should stop doling out worthless advice to people.

    And that's not even noting the fact that the person eating nothing but refined carbs will never have the "willpower" (not real) to resist binging / over eating due to only eating the foods that stimulate increased, relentless hunger.
    I wanted to quote this and stress the bold part as this is very critical. The most important factor in losing weight is the types of food you eat, including what foods you eat in conjunction with each other. They will stimulate what your body does with the calories you took in.

    As a course study you can see what happens if you skip a meal each day and reduce your calorie intake by 30% by doing so. You will lose weight for the first couple weeks, then after that you will see no weight lose as your body will guess that you are starving yourself and defend by slowing your metabolism down in order to conserve the food that it doesn't think you are getting enough of.

    Exercise is always important, but you will find that if you have moderate exercise every day and don't change the way you eat, you will lose next to no weight, while you can eat correctly and not exercise and see massive amounts of weight loss. In my experience, exercise is more critical to staying healthy and fit then it is to losing weight (thought it will increase the rate you can lose weight if you do it in conjunction with a healthy diet).

    @the OP, As several have suggested, speaking to your doctor or a professional dietitian or trainer would go a long way into helping you set up a meal plan that works for you in not only losing the weight in a healthy manner, but in also creating a plan to use to maintain the weight going forward. The main thing I would point out is that you don't want to look at it as going on a diet so much as you want to view it as a lifestyle change.

  16. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragedaug View Post
    I wanted to quote this and stress the bold part as this is very critical. The most important factor in losing weight is the types of food you eat, including what foods you eat in conjunction with each other. They will stimulate what your body does with the calories you took in.

    As a course study you can see what happens if you skip a meal each day and reduce your calorie intake by 30% by doing so. You will lose weight for the first couple weeks, then after that you will see no weight lose as your body will guess that you are starving yourself and defend by slowing your metabolism down in order to conserve the food that it doesn't think you are getting enough of.

    Exercise is always important, but you will find that if you have moderate exercise every day and don't change the way you eat, you will lose next to no weight, while you can eat correctly and not exercise and see massive amounts of weight loss. In my experience, exercise is more critical to staying healthy and fit then it is to losing weight (thought it will increase the rate you can lose weight if you do it in conjunction with a healthy diet).

    @the OP, As several have suggested, speaking to your doctor or a professional dietitian or trainer would go a long way into helping you set up a meal plan that works for you in not only losing the weight in a healthy manner, but in also creating a plan to use to maintain the weight going forward. The main thing I would point out is that you don't want to look at it as going on a diet so much as you want to view it as a lifestyle change.
    Starvation mode does not exist in normal human dieting. It exists when you eat virtually nothing for an extended period of time. Thanks for playing.

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by jbhasban View Post
    Starvation mode does not exist in normal human dieting. It exists when you eat virtually nothing for an extended period of time.
    And I would be fine with that..other than every actual study on the matter saying otherwise.

    Thanks for playing.
    It was my pleasure /grandiose_bow

    ---------- Post added 2012-11-12 at 05:38 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Dakara View Post
    But for the record, carbs do matter, maybe not for everyone, but for a lot of us they do. When I got fat after tearing my ACL and shattering my arm, no matter how strict I calorie counted, or how hard I trained, my weight loss was minimal.... To the point of being negligible. After doing some reading and talking to a nutritionist about each foods role in our diet, I made up my own mind about carbs. The weight came off, stayed off, and I felt great.
    I had a very similar issue. I had torn my ACL playing sports during my stint in the Marine Corps. I ended up gaining 15-20 pounds during my convalescence and was strongly and repeatedly encouraged to take that weight off. In additional to other exercise I ran a minimum of 20 miles every week, worked out on my own. I dropped the first 10 pounds but nothing more. Having no clue what I was doing I would try to skip a meal and would lose a few pounds, then after 2-3 weeks put those few pounds right back on. I switches which meal I was skipping and again lost a few pounds for the first couple weeks, then once again put those pounds right back on.

    I had screwed up my metabolism so badly by the time I talked to an expert that in 6 months I went from eating anything I wanted and being able to maintain my weight along side the standard daily/weekly physical regiment that comes along side being a Marine, to where I would gain 3-5 pounds any time I was indulgent and ate a big dinner and it would take me 2-3 weeks of being very careful what I ate to drop those few pounds.

    But as Dakara is saying, the types of calories you eat absolutely matter, as well as when and how often you eat. They all can be factor's in weight gain and lose.

  18. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragedaug View Post
    And I would be fine with that..other than every actual study on the matter saying otherwise.


    It was my pleasure /grandiose_bow

    ---------- Post added 2012-11-12 at 05:38 AM ----------



    I had a very similar issue. I had torn my ACL playing sports during my stint in the Marine Corps. I ended up gaining 15-20 pounds during my convalescence and was strongly and repeatedly encouraged to take that weight off. In additional to other exercise I ran a minimum of 20 miles every week, worked out on my own. I dropped the first 10 pounds but nothing more. Having no clue what I was doing I would try to skip a meal and would lose a few pounds, then after 2-3 weeks put those few pounds right back on. I switches which meal I was skipping and again lost a few pounds for the first couple weeks, then once again put those pounds right back on.

    I had screwed up my metabolism so badly by the time I talked to an expert that in 6 months I went from eating anything I wanted and being able to maintain my weight along side the standard daily/weekly physical regiment that comes along side being a Marine, to where I would gain 3-5 pounds any time I was indulgent and ate a big dinner and it would take me 2-3 weeks of being very careful what I ate to drop those few pounds.

    But as Dakara is saying, the types of calories you eat absolutely matter, as well as when and how often you eat. They all can be factor's in weight gain and lose.
    Bull shit.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragedaug View Post
    And I would be fine with that..other than every actual study on the matter saying otherwise.


    It was my pleasure /grandiose_bow

    ---------- Post added 2012-11-12 at 05:38 AM ----------



    I had a very similar issue. I had torn my ACL playing sports during my stint in the Marine Corps. I ended up gaining 15-20 pounds during my convalescence and was strongly and repeatedly encouraged to take that weight off. In additional to other exercise I ran a minimum of 20 miles every week, worked out on my own. I dropped the first 10 pounds but nothing more. Having no clue what I was doing I would try to skip a meal and would lose a few pounds, then after 2-3 weeks put those few pounds right back on. I switches which meal I was skipping and again lost a few pounds for the first couple weeks, then once again put those pounds right back on.

    I had screwed up my metabolism so badly by the time I talked to an expert that in 6 months I went from eating anything I wanted and being able to maintain my weight along side the standard daily/weekly physical regiment that comes along side being a Marine, to where I would gain 3-5 pounds any time I was indulgent and ate a big dinner and it would take me 2-3 weeks of being very careful what I ate to drop those few pounds.

    But as Dakara is saying, the types of calories you eat absolutely matter, as well as when and how often you eat. They all can be factor's in weight gain and lose.
    Ignore Jbhasban, he's the king of broscience. Your metabolic rate will change depending on a shit-ton of factors: Weight, activity level, types of food being eaten, when it's being eaten and how much is being eaten. The key is finding a method of eating, and a diet tailored around foods that work for you, and arguably, one that you enjoy eating too (unless you're a professional body builder and / or a fighter doing aggressive "cutting" phases.)

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Reqq View Post
    Ignore Jbhasban, he's the king of broscience. Your metabolic rate will change depending on a shit-ton of factors: Weight, activity level, types of food being eaten, when it's being eaten and how much is being eaten. The key is finding a method of eating, and a diet tailored around foods that work for you, and arguably, one that you enjoy eating too (unless you're a professional body builder and / or a fighter doing aggressive "cutting" phases.)
    But that's still Calories In vs Calories Out. The difficult part is determining Calories Out.

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