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  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angry Bob View Post
    Just realized something

    3.14 written backwards is 41.3 which looks remarkably like PI.E
    Holy shit you're right

  2. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by Mehman View Post
    I've used Tau instead of 2Pi for a while now.
    tau hipster! :P

  3. #123
    I can't make food jokes with Tau.

    Not using it!

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  4. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by Angry Bob View Post
    Just realized something

    3.14 written backwards is 41.3 which looks remarkably like PI.E
    Try 1337% of pi .... see if that gives you a leet meaning of life.

  5. #125
    Warchief godofslack's Avatar
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    I'm surprised no one point out the issue of when you are using + to represent addition, t to represent time and τ to represent 2π. Writing a formula that involves addition and time is already confusing enough, adding tau to the list would make cause unnecessary confusion that's why π is such a good character because there are no English letters that can be confused with it.

    Well that and 1/2τ^2 is more confusing that 2πr

  6. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by godofslack View Post
    π is such a good character because there are no English letters that can be confused with it.

    πoπe whatsoever.

    ---------- Post added 2012-11-11 at 12:10 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Herecius View Post
    I can't make food jokes with Tau.
    Taufu ?

    Taufee Apples rather than Apple Pies ?

  7. #127
    The Insane smrund's Avatar
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    If tau is 2pi, then why should it replace pi? Don't we need to have 1 before we have 2?
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  8. #128
    Warchief godofslack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    πoπe whatsoever
    I only ran into that problem because I couldn't figure out how to write the proper pi. That and pi virtually never runs into n, the only use of n I remember is as a replacement for X when involving geometry.

  9. #129
    Quote Originally Posted by godofslack View Post
    I only ran into that problem because I couldn't figure out how to write the proper pi. That and pi virtually never runs into n, the only use of n I remember is as a replacement for X when involving geometry.
    'n' is used frequently in progression sum formula to represent all values. As for pi and n and tau and t, when all are written properly - all are easy to distinguish.

  10. #130
    Pandaren Monk Auloria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    Actually - that is incorrect. D is fundamental by nature, R is the derived quantity.

    Try it out yourself - draw a circle and try and find the radius without first finding the diameter.
    That's silly. How do you find the diameter? You can't just find the distance between two arbitrary points. You have to find the center of the circle. The next step is to find the distance between the center and the edge (the radius). Then you double it to get the diameter.

    In all my years in math and physics (and I am a physicist), I really cannot recall a time I've ever dealt with a diameter instead of a radius; not in analytical calculations, not in defining geometries for simulations, not in proofs for math theorems, ..

    Oh, actually, the machinists prefer to use the diameter, as it is more practical spec for external measurements of cylinders and so forth, so I do use it in schematics.

    Anyway...

  11. #131
    Quote Originally Posted by Auloria View Post
    That's silly. How do you find the diameter? You can't just find the distance between two arbitrary points.
    You draw an enclosing square around the circle, and measure the width of the square. That simple.

    You have to find the center of the circle.
    You glossed over that one didn't you ... do you realise that to find the centre of the circle - you need two bisecting diameters?

    I really cannot recall a time I've ever dealt with a diameter instead of a radius;
    SO you have never used pi in any of your calculations (C/D) ... ? What branch of physics are you into

  12. #132
    Pandaren Monk Auloria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    You draw an enclosing square around the circle, and measure the width of the square. That simple.


    You glossed over that one didn't you ... do you realise that to find the centre of the circle - you need two bisecting diameters?



    SO you have never used pi in any of your calculations (C/D) ... ? What branch of physics are you into
    I'll grant you those examples. Now here's one: how do you make a circle? Let's nail a piece of string to a board and tie a pencil to the end, and draw a circle by extending the pencil as far as it can go. The length of the string is the radius of the circle.

    It's ridiculous to say that D is more fundamental than R when the difference is a constant factor of 2. To say one is more "fundamental" kind of misuses the meaning. Any single parameter is fine, and the rest is just convention. Regardless, this is an argument over semantics...

    I never said I didn't use pi. (???) I just said we don't use the diameter.

  13. #133
    Warchief godofslack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    'n' is used frequently in progression sum formula to represent all values. As for pi and n and tau and t, when all are written properly - all are easy to distinguish.
    We are talking about math teachers/students here right? I've had professors that can 8s look like Bs and 6s look like Gs, hell I had a teacher for would always write lower case delta as a symbol that looks exactly like d.

    Besides that's what I meant, as a poor man's X (yes I know X usually means any given where as n is used as every given). In most mathematics levels where such confusion would be prevalent people use n to replace X and pi doesn't touch those formulas, where as collision between + t and tau would be fairly common at many levels.
    Last edited by godofslack; 2012-11-11 at 12:47 AM.

  14. #134
    Quote Originally Posted by Auloria View Post
    I'll grant you those examples. Now here's one: how do you make a circle?
    And as you know we define fundamental constants based upon observation, we don't define them on human activities.

    I can tell you now - nature doesn't use a nail and a string to make a circle.

    It's ridiculous to say that D is more fundamental than R when the difference is a constant factor of 2.
    No it isn't , by definition pi is C/D (because both C and D are the raw measurables), there fore any derived quantity from pi is not a fundamental constant. D is measurable without presuming knowledge of pi or r first. R is not - it requires derivation from D and is thus not suitable for basing a fundamental constant on.

    Regardless, this is an argument over semantics...
    Actually - in pure maths and pure physics, the concept of fundamental is pretty well - fundamental

    I never said I didn't use pi. (???)
    Thus the smiley at the end of that line...
    Last edited by schwarzkopf; 2012-11-11 at 12:44 AM.

  15. #135
    Pandaren Monk Auloria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by godofslack View Post
    We are talking about math teachers/students here right? I've had professors that can 8s look like Bs and 6s look like Gs, hell I had a teacher for would always write lower case delta as a symbol that looks exactly like d.
    I've had a thermodynamics professor, who, when pressed on whether he was writing a "Z" (which would mean a partition function) or a "2", wasn't actually able to say for sure, as he couldn't understand his own notes.

  16. #136
    Quote Originally Posted by godofslack View Post
    We are talking about math teachers/students here right? I've had professors that can 8s look like Bs and 6s look like Gs, hell I had a teacher for would always write lower case delta as a symbol that looks exactly like d.
    Yeah - I'm saying that t and tau are no easier to confuse than n and pi - so I'm 100% agreeing with you.

  17. #137
    Warchief godofslack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    Yeah - I'm saying that t and tau are no easier to confuse than n and pi - so I'm 100% agreeing with you.
    I guess so, but I am talking from personal experience with the t + thing, if you are writing a t without the tail it's virtually indistinguishable and adding tau to it makes it even worse, if you forget the top part of t it looks a lot like tau . I've seen some butchered pi's in my math life, but they usually just replace the upper section of a n with a ~.

  18. #138
    Quote Originally Posted by Mehman View Post
    I've used Tau instead of 2Pi for a while now.
    I was using Tau before it was popular.

  19. #139
    Honestly, I believe the debate is quite pointless, we're discussing about one value being the double of the other.
    Tau is 360°, and Pi is 180° so what? What's so hard and counter-intuitive about that?

    On defence of Pi and it's teaching I want to point out that it is a number kids learn to associate with circumferences way before trigonometry, while calculating the area enclosed in a circle.
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  20. #140
    Pandaren Monk Auloria's Avatar
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    I kind of wrinkle my nose at the idea because they picked a very commonly used variable like tau. I'm a little biased, I'm working on a program of measuring lifetimes of radioactive nuclei, and tau is the standard variable used for expressing the lifetime. But throughout the literature, tau gets some serious usage. It's like the letter "e" in the english alphabet. Or at least in the top 6 of the Wheel of Fortune "RSTLNE."

    The problem is that "pi" is an extremely important physical constant throughout math and physics. It's not something you can just change. You really do see it everywhere, it's completely ingrained into the science conscious. Changing it would mean a complete social and economic disaster. I'm talking ATMS spewing fire, planes blowing up mid-flight, the NFL going to a BCS system. Total chaos.

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