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  1. #1
    Scarab Lord Descense's Avatar
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    Question My dog vegeterian?

    Ok there is something that i just dont get it. My dog gets water + dog food + toys to chew + bones 3 times a day but every damn time when i take him out for a walk he wants too eat grass.
    Is he hungry or just stupid ?

    He does that when he stops marking.

    He started too do this half a year ago. (he is kinda old now for a dog years) Is it something in dog food (he is eating the same all the time for last 3 years) or maybe the food he gets off the table from time too time.

  2. #2
    It's not weird, a lot of dogs like to eat stuff like grass, same thing applies to cats.

    It does well on dogs' intestines because when they vomit, it cleans it or something, I have no idea but I think it does them well. :b

  3. #3
    The Lightbringer slime's Avatar
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    As Majad said - they eat grass not out of hunger - but for digestive reasons.

  4. #4
    Mechagnome Xzan's Avatar
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    Pretty much what Majad said. It's completely normal.

  5. #5
    From what i have heard Dogs eat grass to settle there stomach he might be nervous, and file this under stuff i heard when i was a kid but yeah

  6. #6
    Bloodsail Admiral Eliandal's Avatar
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    There are loads of theories as to why dogs eat grass...unfortunately - we can't just ask them

    That being said, most vets don't think it's a problem. My niece says that some people try changing the dogs diet to one higher in fiber and it works...while for others it doesn't. Only thing to be worried about is if he's eating it in a place that uses herbacides/pesticides as they can be extremely toxic to animals.

  7. #7
    Majad's correct. It's suspected that eating grass helps to settle/improve their digestive track. It's also suspected that it may be out of some need for fiber, although don't quote me on anything. So it's perfectly normal, and nothing to worry about. Just watch what grass he's eating, for reasons Eliandal explained.

  8. #8
    Also, my dog used to eat a lot of grass and he regurgitated it, that could mean that eating that cleans the stomach from acids or something.

  9. #9
    Mechagnome Raidboss's Avatar
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    Maybe he just wants a side salad?

  10. #10
    Pandaren Monk Silhouette of Seraphim's Avatar
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    Dogs eat grass so they have something to throw up on your carpet later.
    They can dynamite Devil Reef, but that will bring no relief, Y'ha-nthlei is deeper than they know.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Majad View Post
    Also, my dog used to eat a lot of grass and he regurgitated it, that could mean that eating that cleans the stomach from acids or something.
    Cats do this to.

    They eat their prey as is, including both the edible and inedible parts (fur, bones, feathers, etc.). Since they lack the necessary enzymes to break down vegetable matter, eating grass makes them throw up and clean out the inedible parts.

    Edit: Owls to btw, but they don't need to eat grass to throw up.
    Last edited by Exeris; 2012-11-24 at 08:30 PM.
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  12. #12
    Scarab Lord Descense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotasianchick View Post
    From what i have heard Dogs eat grass to settle there stomach he might be nervous, and file this under stuff i heard when i was a kid but yeah
    Well there are a lot of cats araund. And he hates them. That could be 1 of the reasons.
    But does any1 know how too train him too stop doing that (punishment/angry words doest work).

    But so far i havent seem him vormit due too a grass (only when he eat too hot food or when he was eating a piece of wood stick).

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Descense View Post
    But does any1 know how too train him too stop doing that (punishment/angry words doest work).
    There's no need for punishment, your dog isn't doing anything wrong, it's natural and it's fine.

    Now, if he's eating the grass from your garden, well, that's another matter, if so, just get those plants that cats usually eat too, but I'm not sure if he would eat that or not.

  14. #14
    No one really knows why dogs do this but wolves do it too. There are hypotheses ranging from digestive issues, boredom, curiosity, to it being a learned behavior from their mothers. Bottom line is as long as the grass has no chemicals or pesticides it doesn't seem to harm them. I wouldn't let your dog chomp on a random neighbors grass as it might be treated with lawn chemicals but otherwise let them eat grass if they want to.

  15. #15
    The Patient
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    Quote Originally Posted by Descense View Post
    Well there are a lot of cats araund. And he hates them. That could be 1 of the reasons.
    But does any1 know how too train him too stop doing that (punishment/angry words doest work).

    But so far i havent seem him vormit due too a grass (only when he eat too hot food or when he was eating a piece of wood stick).
    Please don't punish him. It's not fair to punish or scold for doing something that's isn't wrong.

  16. #16
    It's a misnomer to say dogs 'eat' grass. They don't. That implies they are digesting it. They can't.

    As others above have stated; dogs chew on grass for digestive reasons, the most common of which is to induce a nice bought of carpet vomit for you to clean up. If your pup is chewing on more than just grass, or chewing grass all the time he may be experience something called pica; it's a situation where (most often) an animal chews on miscellaneous items - not for the purposes of consuming... but as a means to settle an anxiety.

    We just adopted a shelter pup about 4 months ago that had this going on pretty bad when we first brought him home. He would try to chew rocks, sticks, charcoal from the BBQ ... just anything he could get in his mouth. While it's certainly dangerous behavior the worst thing you can do is get up in the dogs face and yell at him. This behavior is how they are self-medicating and treating anxiety. Yelling will only make it worse.

    Try a more passive approach. Bring a toy or treat or something to give the dog in lieu of grass chewing. You can also buy a bitter apple or bitter lime spray to spray on things he's chewing on. This will taste just awful and HOPEFULLY direct his chewing to more appropriate things (ie. things you haven't hosed with nasty-tasting liquid).

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Descense View Post
    Well there are a lot of cats araund. And he hates them. That could be 1 of the reasons.
    But does any1 know how too train him too stop doing that (punishment/angry words doest work).

    But so far i havent seem him vormit due too a grass (only when he eat too hot food or when he was eating a piece of wood stick).
    A quick google and found two things you might want to try.

    "If you suspect your dog is eating grass because he’s bored, it might be beneficial to be sure he’s getting enough exercise. Engage him in some fun activities. Try tossing a Frisbee or playing another interactive game with him, or buy him a sturdy chew toy to keep him occupied."

    "On the chance that your dog’s pica behavior is caused by a nutritional deficiency, switching to a better dog food, especially a high-fiber variety, could help alleviate the problem."

    Also.. and don't freak out now.

    "Although most experts agree that grazing itself isn’t harmful, one thing to keep in mind is that certain herbicides and pesticides used on lawns can be quite toxic, especially if ingested. In fact, fertilizers were one of the top 10 causes of pet poisoning in 2008."
    It's almost always the wrong argument to compare yourself to the highest DPS specs out there. "Middle of the pack" is actually where everyone is supposed to be. -Ghostcrawler
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  18. #18
    I am Murloc! Fenixdown's Avatar
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    Yeah, when animals get older they tend to eat stuff like grass to help with their digestion. It's perfectly normal.

  19. #19
    The Lightbringer Whitey's Avatar
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    Perfectly normal for a dog to consume grass. Being a vegetarian on the other hand is perfectly abnormal for a dog.
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  20. #20
    Scarab Lord Descense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fenixdown View Post
    Yeah, when animals get older they tend to eat stuff like grass to help with their digestion. It's perfectly normal.
    Do you know by a chance any product that could work on dog like a grass? (yeah i live in contry and not all grass is healty due too pesticides)
    I do know he likes too eat this a lot:


    ....and if you leave him with this plant alone its gona go bye bye in 5 min .

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