1. #1

    Network-IDs, finite?

    Hey all. Atm im doing some reading and as im in this "section" about IP-adresses i found out that there are 3 classes of them as you all know most likely.

    Class A, net.pc.pc.pc
    Class B, net.net.pc.pc
    Class C, net.net.net.pc
    .

    Question is, can two people in different places in the world use the same net code seperately? Since i already googled the answer saying "no" people cant use same network-id adresses as two different networks, then are we limited to 126+16384+ around 2mil networks?

    There are also private ones that can be used by anyone, since its private everyone uses it seperately. But are there really just about 2mil different networks in the world of billions of people or am i just missing something?

  2. #2
    Yes, that number is limited by the fact that an IPv4 address is represented on 32 bits. The salvation comes in the form of IPv6 which is 128bit and we are already transitioning to it.

  3. #3

  4. #4
    The class type addressing/routing doesn't really exist on the active internet these days, it's all classless these days. Your book might have another chapter on classless interdomain routing (CIDR).

    The IPv4 address space is 2^32 in size (roughly 4 billion addresses) and it's approaching exhaustion. IPv6 is the replacement and most of the core Internet now routes IPv6 with end users slowly taking it up. IPv6 has an address space of 2^128 which is significantly larger in size than IPv4.

    On the public routed Internet it's not possible to have the same IP address in two different locations (have a read about how IP addresses are announced and routed using BGP). In order to temporarily solve address space exhaustion in parts of the world, some providers connect their clients behind network address translation (NAT) to save on address usage.

  5. #5
    Alright, thanks for the answers. Got the hang of the idea now

  6. #6
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zatie12 View Post
    and it's approaching exhaustion.
    the last one was sold about 2 years ago, we are out of IPv4 addresses officially

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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    the last one was sold about 2 years ago, we are out of IPv4 addresses officially
    Why not let everyone know we have less than a years worth of wireless bandwidth left as well.

  8. #8
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milkshake86 View Post
    Why not let everyone know we have less than a years worth of wireless bandwidth left as well.
    nah, we'll dig up more bandwidth in a middle eastern country or something

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4_address_exhaustion

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  9. #9
    Pandaren Monk DarkXale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zatie12 View Post
    some providers connect their clients behind network address translation (NAT) to save on address usage.
    Never mind that home 'routers' are 'always' NATs these days. All your home computers, phones, consoles, and tablets are sharing all single IP, with the 'Router' keeping track of who actually uses the variously established links.

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