1. #1

    [Books] Books about theology

    Hi, I find history, mythology and theology super interesting, even as a non believer.

    Can anyone recommend a book about study or history etc of certain religions? Doesn't really matter what religion it is, but the abrahamic religions (islam, christianity and judaism) would be a plus. I know this is kinda broad but that just means people have more area to choose from, so yeah. :P

    Thanks in advance!

    Also, inb4 "read the bible lol"

    Edit: OPPS forgot to include [Books] in the title >.<
    Last edited by CaptainCakepie; 2012-12-30 at 01:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Bloodsail Admiral Memory's Avatar
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    Your request is way too generic. Also, your current level of knowledge is unclear, as much as your expectations. As a general advice, you should avoid the "bestsellers" cathegory. If you want a serious yet accessible take on the subject of Christian theology (I have no advice about the other religions), you could look for some history of early Christian literature or "philosophy" (roughly the first five centuries AD); it will offer you a view on most topics and doctrines, and will be a good base for further study. I don't know what authors are available in your language, try to get something scientifically reliable.

  3. #3
    Pandaren Monk Mnevis's Avatar
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    I like Elaine Pagels' books, for a non-orthodox look at the early church and the development of Christian beliefs.

  4. #4
    I've only ever looked into Christian Theology really, but here are the books I have.

    King James Bible.
    English Standard Version Study Bible.
    Mathew Henry's Bible Commentary.
    The Oxford Bible Commentary.
    Calvin's Commentaries - John Calvin ( Really awesome 22 book set and you can get the whole set for about 150 pounds on Amazon, cheaper in the US. )
    Layman's Bible Commentaries - Mark Strauss, Stephen Leston ( These are super cheap for the set and really good )
    Christian Theology: An Introduction - Alister E. McGrath

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Palmatum View Post
    I've only ever looked into Christian Theology really, but here are the books I have.

    King James Bible.
    English Standard Version Study Bible.
    Mathew Henry's Bible Commentary.
    The Oxford Bible Commentary.
    Calvin's Commentaries - John Calvin ( Really awesome 22 book set and you can get the whole set for about 150 pounds on Amazon, cheaper in the US. )
    Layman's Bible Commentaries - Mark Strauss, Stephen Leston ( These are super cheap for the set and really good )
    Christian Theology: An Introduction - Alister E. McGrath
    Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin is probably a good idea as well.
    Last edited by Velorian; 2013-01-02 at 06:47 PM.

  6. #6
    Free Food!?!?! Tziva's Avatar
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    My area of study at university was comparative world religions (my degrees are in a few different niches of this area), and I can recommend a lot of great books if you're more specific in your request. Your headline says theology but it sounds like you're asking about more general religious studies books. TMI babbe: Although they're often used interchangeably (and it's not really inaccurate to do so), typically if you're talking about history and culture and whatnot, "religious studies" is more appropriately what you're looking for. "Theology" tends to mostly be about the philosophy, doctrines, etc about the nature of the religion and its god(s), and also carries the heavy connotation towards Western religions. It's also more commonly used for religious insiders (ie, a person going to seminary would be studying theology while a secular student studying from an academic outside approach would be "religious studies").... ANYWAY.

    For actual theology: Process theology is particularly interesting. It's generally Christian leaning, but there have been Jewish process theologians. Probably my favourite process theologian is David Ray Griffin. He's written some 9/11 conspiracy theory books I'd look away from but his process thought books are really great. I am particularly fond of Reenchantment Without Supernaturalism.

    For culture and history, give me a religion or an era and I can probably throw a few good suggestions at you.
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  7. #7
    Bloodsail Admiral Memory's Avatar
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    I think the OP already lost interest on theology

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