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  1. #1
    I am Murloc! Orlong's Avatar
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    Id give anything to live like its 1880. Who is with me?

    I am so sick and tired of the way life is in the year 2013. I really wish things were more free and less burdensome like they were in 1800. The only thing I would like to keep from today would be the abolishment of slavery, eradication of racism and equal rights for all. Air conditioning and electricity would be nice too. Back in 1800 we:

    1: Didnt have to pay income tax

    2. Didnt waste trillions of money sending it to other countries in the name of "foreign aid" with no expectation of repayment.

    3. Didnt have 2 million environmental regulations obstructing you from doing just about any kind of construction or business.

    4. If you wanted a swimming pool, shed, porch, or any other structure on your property, you just went out bought the materials and built it. You didnt need to pay a thousand dollars for 6 permits and get permission from 3 government agencies to do so.

    5. You OWNED your home. You never own your home anymore. You just pay rent in the form of property tax since if you cant/wont pay it, the government takes it away and evicts you

    6. Your purchases werent tracked. You could buy a gun, horse, carriage etc... without having to apply for permits, submit your personal information, and register them. (Why do we even need to register our cars every year other than just so the state gets more money from you? Once you own it, it still belongs to you until you sell it.

    7. People were responsible for themselves and didnt ask the government to give them handouts or bail them out whenever they hit a bump in the road. People relied on family and friends in tough times rather than everyone else in the country's pockets. It was actually shameful back then to take a handout from ANYONE.

    8. The government didnt feel like they had to pass 300 or more per year bills just for the sake of passing them just so it looks like they are doing something. (They only convened a few weeks a year).

    9. If you were hungry, you could just go out and shoot a deer or some other animal and eat it. You didnt need to spend $75 for a license that you can only use for certain animals for a certain time period. You could also grow vegetable and fruits without worrying about environmental regulations and sell them along the road without having to buy a license/permit and worry about the USDA or someone who patented a seed which has been around forever shutting you down.

    10. If you wanted to open a business you bought or built a building and did it. You didnt have to comply with 10,000 regulations and pay thousands in fees to a lawyer to make sure everything is compliant with the 10000 regulations you have to comply with just to sell stuff in a store

    11. The government pretty much only existed to defend the country from foreign enemies, and enforce some basic and necessary laws like murder, theft, burglary, rape, and embezzlement.

    Basically, we had the Freedom to do what every we wanted with out own property and lives

  2. #2
    Fluffy Kitten Kasierith's Avatar
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    So tl;dr version, you don't like the federal government, and the structures that ultimately brought the US to the front as a world superpower. I'm sure you'll be hard pressed to give evidence that quality of life was better back then than it is now.

  3. #3
    Brewmaster DieFichte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orlong View Post
    Basically, we had the Freedom to do what every we wanted with out own property and lives
    In case of the United States: "...if you were a white male."

  4. #4
    The Unstoppable Force Rukentuts's Avatar
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    Anyone else appreciate the irony that this post is on an internet forum?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kasierith View Post
    So tl;dr version, you don't like the federal government, and the structures that ultimately brought the US to the front as a world superpower. I'm sure you'll be hard pressed to give evidence that quality of life was better back then than it is now.
    Do you ever sleep? :|
    Quote Originally Posted by GreatOak View Post
    Hey, as a transabled, transethnic, non-binary, genderqueer, neo-communist, indoor-capable republican otherkin I am offended by your callous display of ignorance.
    Quote Originally Posted by Eroginous View Post
    I wouldn't expect someone who thinks science provides proof to know that.

  5. #5
    Herald of the Titans breadisfunny's Avatar
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    there are so many other things we didnt have in 1880 too....like civil rights for minorities.

  6. #6
    The Insane GennGreymane's Avatar
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    no thanks

    i kinda like dating girls that would not be approved of back then with out either of us being killed

    ༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ Praise REGGIE! MY BODY IS READY༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ

  7. #7
    Herald of the Titans Theodon's Avatar
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    I would wager that the moment you get sick and need medical help, your opinion would change dramatically.
    It's always been Wankershim!
    My Brand!

  8. #8
    12. None of the technological, medical or societal advances made in the past 130 years.

  9. #9
    I am Murloc! Tomatketchup's Avatar
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    The only time period I would like to live as a teenager in besides today would be the 90s, but even then I prefer how it is today with the exception of video games and television.
    Kalle Anka-partiet in i svenska riksdagen 2014!

    Don't stop... Don't stop the feelin'

  10. #10
    Herald of the Titans breadisfunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theodon View Post
    I would wager that the moment you get sick and need medical help, your opinion would change dramatically.
    or the moment he realizes there wouldn't be any overnight delivery.back then if you ran out of something and the store didn't have it you either lived without it or you made/hunted/skinned it yourself.

  11. #11
    Fluffy Kitten Kasierith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rukentuts View Post
    Do you ever sleep? :|
    I slept for eight hours! D: and went for a morning jog/cup of cocoa/read some of The Guru Papers. Fascinating book, by the way.

  12. #12
    The Unstoppable Force Rukentuts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kasierith View Post
    I slept for eight hours! D: and went for a morning jog/cup of cocoa/read some of The Guru Papers. Fascinating book, by the way.
    I don't read. Nor do I spend extended amounts of time outside in the freezing tundra that is winter
    Quote Originally Posted by GreatOak View Post
    Hey, as a transabled, transethnic, non-binary, genderqueer, neo-communist, indoor-capable republican otherkin I am offended by your callous display of ignorance.
    Quote Originally Posted by Eroginous View Post
    I wouldn't expect someone who thinks science provides proof to know that.

  13. #13
    The freedom people had in the 19th century compared to today is something to be jealous of, without a doubt.

    The other crap that went with living in the 19th century... not so much.

  14. #14
    Fluffy Kitten Kasierith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rukentuts View Post
    I don't read. Nor do I spend extended amounts of time outside in the freezing tundra that is winter
    Ahaha.. I've gone cross country backpacking in the winter, in Russia. you know naught of winter.

  15. #15
    Talk about nostalgia goggles. We live in the apex of human progress and development, and the OP is what, sick and tired of the convenient of computers, the internet, the entertainment, the transportation networks, the modern medicine, the peace and security of not dying in the trenches of WW1?


    Quote Originally Posted by Kasierith View Post
    I slept for eight hours! D: and went for a morning jog/cup of cocoa/read some of The Guru Papers. Fascinating book, by the way.
    Weren't you just posting like four hours ago? o.O
    Or were you up that early :O

  16. #16
    Brewmaster DieFichte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laize View Post
    The freedom people had in the 19th century compared to today is something to be jealous of, without a doubt.
    Ask woman, black people or different minorities.

    Quote Originally Posted by semaphore View Post

    Weren't you just posting a couple of hours ago? o.O
    Can't you post and sleep at the same time? Pfff...

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Orlong View Post
    I am so sick and tired of the way life is in the year 2013. I really wish things were more free and less burdensome like they were in 1800.



    3. Didnt have 2 million environmental regulations obstructing you from doing just about any kind of construction or business.



    Basically, we had the Freedom to do what every we wanted with out own property and lives

    So you want to live like the 1880s but you frown upon laws that try to preserve the environment. lol?


    And since you dont seem to know what happened back then here is a short list of laws passed before 1880 by the US government.



    1st United States Congress
    June 1, 1789: An act to regulate the time and manner of administering certain oaths, Sess. 1, ch. 1, 1 Stat. 23
    July 4, 1789: Hamilton Tariff, Sess. 1, ch. 2, 1 Stat. 24
    August 7, 1789: An Act for the establishment and support of Lighthouses, Beacons, Buoys, and Public Piers, Sess. 1, ch. 9, 1 Stat. 53
    September 24, 1789: Judiciary Act of 1789, Sess. 1, ch. 20, 1 Stat. 73
    March 1, 1790: Census of 1790, Sess. 2, ch. 2, 1 Stat. 101
    March 26, 1790: Naturalization Act of 1790, Sess. 2, ch. 3, 1 Stat. 103
    April 10, 1790: Patent Act, Sess. 2, ch. 7, 1 Stat. 109
    May 26, 1790: Southwest Ordinance, Sess. 2, ch. 14, 1 Stat. 123
    May 31, 1790: Copyright Act of 1790, Sess. 2, ch. 15, 1 Stat. 124
    July 6, 1790: Residence Act, Sess. 2, ch. 28, 1 Stat. 130
    July 22, 1790: Indian Intercourse Act of 1790, Sess. 2, ch. 33, 1 Stat. 137
    August 4, 1790: Funding Act of 1790, Sess. 2, ch. 34, 1 Stat. 138
    February 25, 1791: First Bank of the United States, Sess. 3, ch. 10, 1 Stat. 191
    March 3, 1791: Whiskey Act, Sess. 3, ch. 15, 1 Stat. 199

    2nd United States Congress
    February 20, 1792: Postal Service Act, Sess. 1, ch. 7, 1 Stat. 232
    April 2, 1792: Coinage Act of 1792, Sess. 1, ch. 16, 1 Stat. 246
    May 2, 1792: First Militia Act of 1792, Sess. 1, ch. 28, 1 Stat. 264
    May 8, 1792: Second Militia Act of 1792, Sess. 1, ch. 33, 1 Stat. 271
    February 12, 1793: Fugitive Slave Law of 1793, Sess. 2, ch. 7, 1 Stat. 302
    February 18, 1793: An Act for enrolling and licensing ships or vessels to be employed in the coasting trade and fisheries, and for regulating the same, Sess. 2, ch. 8, 1 Stat. 305
    March 2, 1793: Judiciary Act of 1793, Sess. 2, ch. 22, 1 Stat. 333 (including Anti-Injunction Act)

    3rd United States Congress
    March 27, 1794: Naval Act of 1794, Sess. 1, ch. 12, 1 Stat. 350
    January 29, 1795: Naturalization Act of 1795, Sess. 2, ch. 20, 1 Stat. 414

    4th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]

    5th United States Congress
    April 30, 1798: The U.S. Department of the Navy was established, Sess. 2, ch. 35, 1 Stat. 553
    June 18, 1798: Alien and Sedition Acts: An Act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization (Naturalization Act of 1798), Sess. 2, ch. 54, 1 Stat. 566
    June 25, 1798: Alien and Sedition Acts: An Act concerning Aliens, Sess. 2, ch. 58, 1 Stat. 570
    July 6, 1798: Alien and Sedition Acts: An Act respecting Alien Enemies, Sess. 2, ch. 66, 1 Stat. 577
    July 9, 1798: Act Further to Protect the Commerce of the United States, Sess. 2, ch. 68, 1 Stat. 578
    July 11, 1798: The Marine Corps was established, Sess. 2, ch. 72, 1 Stat. 594
    July 14, 1798: Alien and Sedition Acts: An Act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States (Sedition Act), Sess. 2, ch. 74, 1 Stat. 596
    July 16, 1798: An Act for the relief of sick and disabled seamen, Sess. 2, ch. 77, 1 Stat. 605

    6th United States Congress
    February 13, 1801: Judiciary Act of 1801, Sess. 2, ch. 4, 2 Stat. 89
    February 27, 1801: District of Columbia Organic Act of 1801, Sess.2, ch. 15, 2 Stat. 103


    7th United States Congress
    April 29, 1802: Judiciary Act of 1802, Sess. 1, ch. 31, 2 Stat. 156
    April 30, 1802: Enabling Act of 1802, Sess. 1, ch. 40, 2 Stat. 173

    8th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]

    9th United States Congress
    March 29, 1806: Cumberland Road, Sess. 1, ch. 19, 2 Stat. 357
    February 24, 1807: Seventh Circuit Act, 2 Stat. 420
    March 2, 1807: Slave Trade Prohibition Act, Sess. 2, ch. 22, 2 Stat. 426

    10th United States Congress
    December 22, 1807: Embargo Act of 1807, Sess. 1, ch. 5, 2 Stat. 451
    March 1, 1809: Non-Intercourse Act, Sess. 2, ch. 24, 2 Stat. 528

    11th United States Congress
    May 1, 1810: Macon's Bill Number 2, Sess. 2, ch. 39, 2 Stat. 605


    [edit]12th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]13th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [
    14th United States Congress
    April 10, 1816: Second Bank of the United States, Sess. 1, ch. 94, 3 Stat. 266
    April 27, 1816: Dallas tariff, Sess. 1, ch. 107, 3 Stat. 310

    15th United States Congress
    April 4, 1818: Flag Act of 1818, Sess. 1, ch. 34, 3 Stat. 415
    April 18, 1818: Navigation Act of 1818, Sess. 1, ch. 70, 3 Stat. 432

    16th United States Congress
    March 6, 1820: Missouri Compromise, Sess. 1, ch. 22, 3 Stat. 545
    April 24, 1820: Land Act of 1820, Sess. 1, ch. 51, 3 Stat. 566

    17th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]18th United States Congress
    January 7, 1824: Tariff of 1824, Sess. 1, ch.4, 4 Stat. 2
    [edit]19th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]

    20th United States Congress
    May 24, 1828: Tariff of Abominations, Sess. 1, ch. 111, 4 Stat. 308

    ]21st United States Congress
    May 28, 1830: Indian Removal Act, Sess. 1, ch. 148, 4 Stat. 411
    [edit]1831 to 1841


    22nd United States Congress
    July 14, 1832: Tariff of 1832, Sess. 1, ch. 227, 4 Stat. 583
    March 2, 1833: Compromise Tariff (Tariff of 1833), Sess. 2, ch. 55, 4 Stat. 629
    March 2, 1833: Force Bill, Sess. 2, ch. 57, 4 Stat. 632

    [edit]23rd United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]24th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]25th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]26th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]1841 to 1851

    [edit]27th United States Congress
    April 19, 1841: Bankruptcy Act of 1841, ch. 9, 5 Stat. 440
    September 4, 1841: Preemption Act of 1841, ch. 16, 5 Stat. 453
    August 4, 1842: Armed Occupation Act, 5 Stat. 502
    August 30, 1842: Tariff of 1842 ("Black Tariff"), ch. 270, 5 Stat. 548

    [edit]28th United States Congress
    January 23, 1845: Presidential Election Day Act, ch. 1, 5 Stat. 721
    March 3, 1845: An act relating to revenue cutters and steamers, ch. 78, 5 Stat. 795

    [edit]29th United States Congress
    July 9, 1846: District of Columbia retrocession, ch. 35, 9 Stat. 35
    July 30, 1846: Walker tariff, Sess. 1, ch. 74, 9 Stat. 42

    [edit]30th United States Congress
    March 3, 1849: Coinage Act of 1849, ch. 109, 9 Stat. 397

    [edit]31st United States Congress
    September 9, 1850: Compromise of 1850, ch. 49, 9 Stat. 446
    September 18, 1850: Fugitive Slave Act, ch. 60, 9 Stat. 462
    September 29, 1850: Donation Land Claim Act, ch. 76, 9 Stat. 496
    [edit]1851 to 1861

    [edit]32nd United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
    [edit]33rd United States Congress
    May 30, 1854: Kansas-Nebraska Act, ch. 59, 10 Stat. 277

    [edit]34th United States Congress
    August 18, 1856: Guano Islands Act, ch. 164, 11 Stat. 119

    [edit]35th United States Congress
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]

    [edit]36th United States Congress
    March 2, 1861: Morrill tariff, ch. 68, 12 Stat. 178
    [edit]1861 to 1871

    [edit]37th United States Congress
    August 5, 1861: Revenue Act of 1861, Sess. 1, ch. 45, 12 Stat. 292
    August 6, 1861: Confiscation Act of 1861, Sess. 1, ch. 60, 12 Stat. 319
    February 25, 1862: Legal Tender Act of 1862, Sess. 2, ch. 33, 12 Stat. 345
    April 16, 1862: Slavery in the District of Columbia abolished, Sess. 2, ch. 54, 12 Stat. 376
    May 15, 1862: An Act to Establish a Department of Agriculture, Sess. 2, ch. 72, 12 Stat. 387
    May 20, 1862: Homestead Act, Sess. 2, ch. 75, 12 Stat. 392
    June 19, 1862: An Act to secure Freedom to all persons within the Territories of the United States, Sess. 2, ch 111, 12 Stat. 432
    July 1, 1862: Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act, Sess. 2, ch. 126, 12 Stat. 501
    July 1, 1862: Revenue Act of 1862, Sess. 2, ch. 119, 12 Stat. 432
    July 1, 1862: Pacific Railway Act, Sess. 2, ch. 120, 12 Stat. 489
    July 2, 1862: Morrill Land Grant Colleges Act, Sess. 2, ch. 130, 12 Stat. 503
    July 17, 1862: Militia Act of 1862, Sess. 2, ch. 201, 12 Stat. 597
    February 25, 1863: National Banking Act, Sess. 3, ch 58, 12 Stat. 665
    March 2, 1863: False Claims Act, Sess. 3, ch. 67, 12 Stat. 696
    March 3, 1863: Enrollment Act, Sess. 3, ch. 75, 12 Stat. 731
    March 3, 1863: Habeas Corpus Suspension Act, Sess. 3, ch. 81, 12 Stat. 755
    March 3, 1863: Tenth Circuit Act, 12 Stat. 794

    [edit]38th United States Congress
    April 22, 1864: Coinage Act of 1864, Sess. 1, ch. 66, 13 Stat. 54
    March 3, 1865: Freedman's Bureau, Sess. 2, ch. 90, 13 Stat. 507

    [edit]39th United States Congress
    April 9, 1866: Civil Rights Act of 1866, ch. 31, 14 Stat. 27
    July 23, 1866: Judicial Circuits Act, ch. 210, 14 Stat. 209
    March 2, 1867: Reconstruction Act, ch. 153, 14 Stat. 428
    March 2, 1867: Tenure of Office Act, ch. 154, 14 Stat. 430

    [edit]40th United States Congress
    Reconstruction Acts, continued:
    March 23, 1867, ch. 6, 15 Stat. 2
    July 19, 1867, ch. 30, 15 Stat. 14
    March 11, 1868, ch. 25, 15 Stat. 25
    July 27, 1868: Expatriation Act of 1868, ch. 249, 15 Stat. 223

    [edit]41st United States Congress
    April 10, 1869: Judiciary Act of 1869 (Circuit Judges Act of 1869), ch. 22, 16 Stat. 44
    May 31, 1870: Force Act of 1870, ch. 114, 16 Stat. 140
    July 14, 1870: Naturalization Act of 1870, ch. 254, 16 Stat. 254
    February 21, 1871: District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871, ch. 62, 16 Stat. 419
    [
    edit]1871 to 1881

    [edit]42nd United States Congress
    April 20, 1871: Ku Klux Act (Civil Rights Act of 1871, Ku Klux Klan Act), ch. 22, 17 Stat. 13
    March 1, 1872: Yellowstone Act, ch. 24, 17 Stat. 32
    May 10, 1872: General Mining Act of 1872, ch. 152, 17 Stat. 91, R.S. §§2319–2328, 2331, 2333–2338, 2344
    May 22, 1872: Amnesty Act, ch. 193, 17 Stat. 142
    June 1, 1872: Practice Conformity Act (precursor to the Rules Enabling Act), ch. 255, 17 Stat. 196
    February 12, 1873: Coinage Act of 1873, ch. 131, 17 Stat. 424
    March 3, 1873: Comstock Act, ch. 258, 17 Stat. 598
    March 3, 1873: Timber Culture Act, ch. 277, 17 Stat. 205

    [edit]43rd United States Congress
    June 23, 1874: Poland Act, ch. 469, 18 Stat. 253
    January 14, 1875: Specie Payment Resumption Act, ch. 15, 18 Stat. 296
    March 1, 1875: Civil Rights Act of 1875, 18 Stat. 335
    March 3, 1875: Page Act of 1875, ch. 141, 18 Stat. 477

    [edit]44th United States Congress
    March 3, 1877: Desert Land Act

    [edit]45th United States Congress
    February 28, 1878: Bland-Allison Act (Coinage Act (Silver Dollar)), Sess. 2, ch. 20, 20 Stat. 25
    April 29, 1878: National Quarantine Act, Sess. 2, ch. 66, 20 Stat. 37
    June 3, 1878: Timber and Stone Act, Sess. 2, ch. 151, 20 Stat. 89
    June 18, 1878: Posse Comitatus Act, Sess. 2, ch. 263, §15, 20 Stat. 152
    Last edited by phenix; 2013-01-05 at 05:50 PM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by semaphore View Post
    Talk about nostalgia goggles. We live in the apex of human progress and development, and the OP is what, sick and tired of the convenient of computers, the internet, the entertainment, the transportation networks, the modern medicine, the peace and security of not dying in the trenches of WW1?


    Weren't you just posting a couple of hours ago? o.O
    Did you read his post?

    He's not sick of modern trappings such as computers. He's sick of the government. It's a political post.

  19. #19
    High Overlord
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    You all have trouble reading obviously, he included the bit about equal rights for all in his post.

    I'm on board with you OP, the freedoms you listed are what allowed us to become a superpower (steel superproduction anyone? you bet that shit wasn't regulated,) and if anything all the bullshit the government is weighing us down with now has caused more detriment to our position as the #1 country in the world than anything else.

  20. #20
    The Lightbringer Deadvolcanoes's Avatar
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    I'm an educated white male, so yeah, I'd like to try it out for a couple days.
    It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere.

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