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  1. #121
    Quote Originally Posted by Zhangfei View Post
    Do you even know what husbandry is? Society's valuing aggression and breeding for it (lol) would be legitimate if there was evidence that a certain type of human was inherently more aggressive, but they aren't. It's never happened because we've never had an omnipotent power like the Bene Gesserit to do it.
    ok what dogs were bred with aggression in mind, which dogs were bred specifically for aggressiveness as a desired trait?

  2. #122
    Scarab Lord Zhangfei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamdwelf View Post
    ok what dogs were bred with aggression in mind, which dogs were bred specifically for aggressiveness as a desired trait?
    Pit bulls, Rottweilers spring to mind straight off.

    Anything that hunts as well.
    In fact as far as I'm aware the UK is the only european nation that outright bans guns for civilians.
    Shotguns I'll give you (provided you're allowed 12 and larger gauges... because I mean... come on...) but not .22s.
    This is why people ban guns. Gun supporters don't know what guns are.

  3. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by Zhangfei View Post
    Pit bulls, Rottweilers spring to mind straight off.

    Anything that hunts as well.
    Pit bulls were bred to catch and wrangle cattle, as well as be family pets.

    Rottweilers were also originally used for herding they are not aggressive but protective.

    Hunting dogs were bred with usually more smell receptors and then retrieving abilities not aggressiveness they were bred to be able to find prey and then get it after it was fell none of these breeds were bred for aggressiveness.

  4. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by Gamdwelf View Post
    ok what dogs were bred with aggression in mind, which dogs were bred specifically for aggressiveness as a desired trait?
    Alot of different breeds have ben bred, at some point or another in history, for agression. This is called unresponsible breeding. Bedlington terrier is one of those breeds.
    Few dogs were "created" for only expressing aggression. Most of the breeds you and other consider "aggressive" are in fact WORKING dogs. Bred for helping the owner around the house and farm.

  5. #125
    Titan Winter Blossom's Avatar
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    Blame the numerous irresponsible/ignorant owners of "certain" breeds.
    Last edited by Winter Blossom; 2013-01-08 at 07:32 PM.

  6. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by Skarssen View Post
    All domestic dogs are Canis familiaris. Same species, different breeds.
    Canis lupus familiaris - these days they are considered a sub-species rather than a separate species from wolves - mostly that's down to DNA comparisons.

    I am a dog owner myself, had a Labrador as a kid, had two Malamutes as rescues, and now got two Finnish Laphunds. I've also owned a bunch of chinchillas and worked in a zoo for a while. The reason I mention this is one thing I have noted from working with so many animals is they all have their own personalities. Even chinchillas (similarish to a small rabbit for those that don't know) each had very distinct and separate character traits, even parent to offspring could easily be differed from behaviour. Everyone saying my dog was the softest dog ever, well I'm sure they were, but your dog being soft and friendly doesn't make all dogs of the same breed the same. One of my malamutes was (seemingly) very aggressive towards other dogs, she could never be let off her lead, very rarely could we pass another dog without her going into a very scary looking barking fit and a lot of pulling towards the other dog. She 'bit' me once trying to pull across me while barking and caught my leg just above in the side of her mouth. The other Mal is a lump. You almost have to kick her to get up, she is overweight even after being on diet food for an extended period of time and when she sees another dog all she wants to do is play, though she usually can't keep up with them. (Remember these are both rescues). My longwinded point is that saying that a breed doesn't have a higher potential for aggressiveness because your dog is a softie is not so far off from saying all cars are red because my car is red. Yeah bad example but you get the point.

  7. #127
    Scarab Lord Fahrenheit's Avatar
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    It's all in how you raise them. You can have a sweet as candy pit, rott, GSD or a menacingly evil poodle or corgi.
    Rudimentary creatures of blood and flesh. You touch my mind, fumbling in ignorance, incapable of understanding.
    You exist because we allow it, and you will end because we demand it.

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  8. #128
    Moderator Callimonk's Avatar
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    I happen to own a Doberman Pinscher. She's 9 months old, and an incredibly affectionate dog. I wouldn't trade her for the world.

    However, I know that I would find it very hard to find a new place to live if I had to. I'm lucky because I happen to own my own home - but I know I'd have to rehome her if I ever lost it.

    Breed specific legislation is terrible - they target breeds that just have a certain stigma. You'd be surprised at some of the breeds that appear on there. Any dog can be vicious, and any dog can be amazing - it's in how they are trained from the time they are pups.

    Also, one of the most dangerous breeds is the Chihuahua. Why? Because people underestimate it. Just last year, a Chihuahua killed a pit bull at a dog training school that I take my girl to. Everyone thought it was "cute" that the Chi "thought it was bigger than the other dog"... until it went for the throat.

  9. #129
    Titan Winter Blossom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fahrenheit View Post
    It's all in how you raise them. You can have a sweet as candy pit, rott, GSD or a menacingly evil poodle or corgi.
    Being a Vet Tech, I find that most of the aggressive/biters are toy breeds. This is because most owners of small breeds don't discipline them because, "their so cute and small" *rolls eyes*. They get away with WAY too much.

    My mother-in-law has two chihuahuas, and they are nasty little things. They get away with everything. They will try and nip my kids if they sit down next to their grandmother, and also will nip my other larger breed dogs. Thankfully, my dogs don't take them seriously (although, I can't say I'd be upset if one of my dogs gave them whats coming to 'em). They also shit and piss anywhere they please. When I get upset about it, all I get from my mother-in-law is, "oh, it's so small it doesn't matter"...gross. I tell her all the time, that if they bite my kids I'm going to throw their asses outside to the hawks.
    Last edited by Winter Blossom; 2013-01-08 at 09:17 PM.

  10. #130
    Quote Originally Posted by Gamdwelf View Post
    ok what dogs were bred with aggression in mind, which dogs were bred specifically for aggressiveness as a desired trait?
    aggression is typically a misdirected trait that was actually bred for (assuming proper breeding). dogs with strong protective instincts if untrained can be aggressive, because they havent learned the correct responses. hunting dogs are generally supposed to have a strong "pack" instinct, which directs aggression towards prey. things along that line. i know of none that were bred for pure aggression, as it would be unmanageable. it is almost always for directed or purposeful aggression
    Quote Originally Posted by TradewindNQ View Post
    The fucking Derpship has crashed on Herp Island...
    Quote Originally Posted by Wells View Post
    Meet the new derp.

    Same as the old derp.

  11. #131
    Dreadlord Wookeh's Avatar
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    Really the only dog that i consider dangerous is a chow chow. Why ? Well they tend to bind themselves to one person and one person alone even if you're in a family of two or more. They're extremely protective, but even with that breed it's all about how firm you are and how you raise them. I own a German Shepherd and Malinois myself, both have the Dutch KNPV 1 & 2 license making them police dogs. They look dangerous, they can act dangerous, but they're delightful dogs that are great with children.... they're just clumsy.

  12. #132
    Moderator Callimonk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookeh View Post
    Really the only dog that i consider dangerous is a chow chow. Why ? Well they tend to bind themselves to one person and one person alone even if you're in a family of two or more. They're extremely protective, but even with that breed it's all about how firm you are and how you raise them. I own a German Shepherd and Malinois myself, both have the Dutch KNPV 1 & 2 license making them police dogs. They look dangerous, they can act dangerous, but they're delightful dogs that are great with children.... they're just clumsy.
    Chows are typically considered more dangerous because their strange body type are more difficult to read. They could be waving their hands in the air telling you that they aren't comfortable with the situation, and it could be misinterpretted.

    Mals are awesome dogs

  13. #133
    The Insane Didactic's Avatar
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    I've always preferred large dogs for some reason. My current pair are both German Shepherds, and I love them to pieces.
    Right, as the world goes, is only in question between equals in power, while the strong do what they can and the weak suffer what they must.
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    There is a modern myth that people have always tended towards democracy, constitutions, electoral rights; but in truth, love of freedom has never been the predominant note of popular politics. At most times, popular demand has been for a strong government.
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