1. #1

    [Books] something i've noticed about teenage literature

    every single teenage novel i've encountered has either a teenager or a fantasy figure who can pass as a teenager (halfling, hobbit, dwarf) in the main role.

    and really, every single one of them. Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl, Anthony Horowitz, the Hunger Games, the neverending story,... I can't think of a single book aimed at teenagers or young adults that has an adult as the protagonist. even the Hobbit has, well, a hobbit as the main lead.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by nzall View Post
    every single teenage novel i've encountered has either a teenager or a fantasy figure who can pass as a teenager (halfling, hobbit, dwarf) in the main role.

    and really, every single one of them. Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl, Anthony Horowitz, the Hunger Games, the neverending story,... I can't think of a single book aimed at teenagers or young adults that has an adult as the protagonist. even the Hobbit has, well, a hobbit as the main lead.
    It's kind of the point - a character that is similar to the reader can instantly be identified with. Also most good writers start by writing what they know, which tends to be young adult fiction and then build from there. Trying to have a main character that is nothing like the reader can be awkward unless a lot of time is taken to build the character up first. Also, female audiences tend to prefer to have a character they can essentially Mary Sue.

    Take 50 Shades Of Grey for example, it's absolute tripe, but it allows female readers to insert themselves in the protagonist's shoes, which is highly appealing to them. Keep in mind that this is a hugely broad generalisation, but it's been tried and tested numerous times across the years and does work.

  3. #3
    Brewmaster Ferg's Avatar
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    FYI, Bilbo and Frodo Baggins were both in their 50s during the events of their respective stories.
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  4. #4
    Dreadlord
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    Yes, i think you defined teenage literature quite well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Yoonalol View Post
    wat are the 2 gob mounts.. i only know the trike

  5. #5
    Short is not defining of teenager.

  6. #6
    Dreadlord Xe4ro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nzall View Post
    even the Hobbit has, well, a hobbit as the main lead.
    Well guess what. Tolkien wanted to do a Book for Children to read.
    Druid since Feb. 06

  7. #7
    I honestly can't tell if you are serious as that is the whole idea since people can relate to the main lead.

  8. #8
    by that logic you're implying that Lotr is teenage literature since frodo is hobbit? Btw he's around 50 at time of lotr events

  9. #9
    Yeah this seems kind of obvious to me too. Teen Lit is for teens because it is relatable to teens. Sometimes teenagers think to themselves that they would like to read a story that represents their hardships and tribulations. If they want a story centered around adult themes then they read something not aimed at Young Adult.
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  10. #10
    Scarab Lord AceofHarts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mexa View Post
    Yes, i think you defined teenage literature quite well.
    Sword of Truth the MC is well into his 20s.

  11. #11
    The Patient Valkari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcelos11 View Post
    Sword of Truth the MC is well into his 20s.
    I would hardly call that "teenage literature", though. That's like saying the same about The Malazan Book of the Fallen, or the Wheel of Time series.

    OT: Yes, books tend to have main characters that the target audience could relate to, that's kind of the idea.
    Last edited by Valkari; 2013-01-16 at 02:15 AM.

  12. #12
    Scarab Lord AceofHarts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valkari View Post
    I would hardly call that "teenage literature", though. That's like saying the same about The Malazan Book of the Fallen, or the Wheel of Time series.

    OT: Yes, books tend to have main characters that the target audience could relate to, that's kind of the idea.
    umm no. there is a HUGE difference between sword of truth and the other two listed there.
    sword of truth: "this was no chicken, this was evil incarnate".
    wheel of time: would explain, in DEPTH, why the chicken was screwed up.
    sword of truth was generally poorly written, and any fan of high fantasy is mostly offended by the lack of depth in sword of truth. sword of truth, the good guys are purely good, having no bad qualities at all, and the bad guys are the opposite (pure evil/bad, no good qualities). in wheel of time that is not the case at all.

  13. #13
    Moderator Zoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcelos11 View Post
    umm no. there is a HUGE difference between sword of truth and the other two listed there.
    While I agree that there is a large difference between those books, I wouldn't consider any of them to be teenage literature (although technically, I did start WoT as a teenager).

  14. #14
    The Patient Valkari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoma View Post
    While I agree that there is a large difference between those books, I wouldn't consider any of them to be teenage literature (although technically, I did start WoT as a teenager).
    That would be more the point I was getting at, not saying they're exactly the same style of book, just that it's certainly not what I'd call teen literature in the usual sense.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by marcelos11 View Post
    sword of truth: "this was no chicken, this was evil incarnate".
    lol come on man...I loved the chicken that was not a chicken.
    Get a grip man! It's CHEESE!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferg View Post
    FYI, Bilbo and Frodo Baggins were both in their 50s during the events of their respective stories.
    But with hobbit lifespans, 50 is relatively young.

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  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinzai View Post
    Take 50 Shades Of Grey for example, it's absolute tripe, but it allows female readers to insert themselves in the protagonist's shoes, which is highly appealing to them. Keep in mind that this is a hugely broad generalisation, but it's been tried and tested numerous times across the years and does work.
    I guess my country is the exception then.

    Because I don't know any women who even like 50 shades of grey. My mother and aunts picked it up due to the hype, and all concluded that is was pure porn and started ignoring it.

    And I don't like that all the new movies have a teenage main star. It's quite the stretch that a person who isn't fully developed and stable yet can lead and achieve more than an adult. I just find it insulting to the audience. It's not realistic, at all.

    For me, realism means more than having a connection to the main star of a book or movie. I guess that's the rational side winning over the emotional side?

  18. #18
    Well duh. It's not a solid rule, but it's obviously going to be common to have a main character be relateable to the main intended audience. It's the simplest way to boost immersion into a story.

    For instance, Twilight had an airheaded female lead for its airheaded female audience. Simple.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Hardstyler01 View Post
    I guess my country is the exception then.

    Because I don't know any women who even like 50 shades of grey. My mother and aunts picked it up due to the hype, and all concluded that is was pure porn and started ignoring it.

    And I don't like that all the new movies have a teenage main star. It's quite the stretch that a person who isn't fully developed and stable yet can lead and achieve more than an adult. I just find it insulting to the audience. It's not realistic, at all.

    For me, realism means more than having a connection to the main star of a book or movie. I guess that's the rational side winning over the emotional side?
    A few women =/= the millions worldwide that did like the book for whatever reason, unless you're related to the only women in your country.

    As to the age, the majority of people who become great start young. Being young does not mean someone cannot achieve... well anything. Being young in general isn't an issue, they are young because of their target audiences.

  20. #20
    Mechagnome Bad Ashe's Avatar
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    i was always a huge fan of the Death Gate Cycle books as a teenager (and now)
    nearly all the characters are well into adulthood.

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