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  1. #1
    The Lightbringer Romire's Avatar
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    Angry [US] Nurse refuses to perform CPR

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/201...on-dying-woman

    An elderly woman died at a US retirement home after a nurse refused to perform CPR on her, despite a 911 operator pleading with her to do so.

    In audio of the emergency services call, the nurse at Glenwood Gardens in California can be heard repeatedly refusing to perform CPR on 87-year-old resident Lorraine Bayless after she collapsed on Tuesday.
    The dispatcher begs the nurse to perform resuscitation until paramedics can arrive, but she insists it is against the centre's policy for staff to perform CPR and says she won't bend the rules.

    "As a human being … is there anybody there that is willing to help this lady and not let her die?" the dispatcher says in the call.
    But the nurse says, "not at this time".
    The dispatcher appears to become increasingly desperate and urges the nurse to hand the phone to someone not employed by the centre so they can do CPR instead.

    "Is there a gardener or any staff, anybody that doesn't work for you, anywhere?" she said.
    "Can we flag someone down in the street and get them to help this lady?"
    Ms Bayless, a resident of the independent living part of the centre, was pronounced dead at hospital after collapsing and having trouble breathing at the centre, authorities said.

    Glenwood Gardens said it would launch an investigation but stood by its CPR policy.
    "In the event of a health emergency at this independent living community, our practice is to immediately call emergency medical personnel for assistance and to wait with the individual needing attention until such personnel arrives," it said in a written statement.
    "That is the protocol we followed."
    Ms Bayless' daughter, who is also a nurse, says she is satisfied with the care her mother received

    Additional Sources:
    ABC NEws: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/911-...m-cpr-18640828
    NBC: http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/lo...194588781.html

    I would of given CPR regardless
    Quote Originally Posted by Azerox View Post
    Hahaha this is funny.

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  2. #2
    Jeeze....imagine that. You'd rather let someone die than break the rules.

  3. #3
    Elemental Lord Masark's Avatar
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    I'm wondering if there was a DNR order.

  4. #4
    If the daughter was happy with the care provided, then perhaps the woman had a DNR order attached and not all the facts have been given to the media. Or perhaps the media has more information, but to get a sensationalized attention grab, they aren't reporting all of the facts.
    when all else fails, read the STICKIES.

  5. #5
    The Unstoppable Force RICH816's Avatar
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    That is fucked up, I would have done CPR regardless.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Romire View Post
    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/201...on-dying-woman

    An elderly woman died at a US retirement home after a nurse refused to perform CPR on her, despite a 911 operator pleading with her to do so.

    In audio of the emergency services call, the nurse at Glenwood Gardens in California can be heard repeatedly refusing to perform CPR on 87-year-old resident Lorraine Bayless after she collapsed on Tuesday.
    The dispatcher begs the nurse to perform resuscitation until paramedics can arrive, but she insists it is against the centre's policy for staff to perform CPR and says she won't bend the rules.

    "As a human being … is there anybody there that is willing to help this lady and not let her die?" the dispatcher says in the call.
    But the nurse says, "not at this time".
    The dispatcher appears to become increasingly desperate and urges the nurse to hand the phone to someone not employed by the centre so they can do CPR instead.

    "Is there a gardener or any staff, anybody that doesn't work for you, anywhere?" she said.
    "Can we flag someone down in the street and get them to help this lady?"
    Ms Bayless, a resident of the independent living part of the centre, was pronounced dead at hospital after collapsing and having trouble breathing at the centre, authorities said.

    Glenwood Gardens said it would launch an investigation but stood by its CPR policy.
    "In the event of a health emergency at this independent living community, our practice is to immediately call emergency medical personnel for assistance and to wait with the individual needing attention until such personnel arrives," it said in a written statement.
    "That is the protocol we followed."
    Ms Bayless' daughter, who is also a nurse, says she is satisfied with the care her mother received

    Additional Sources:
    ABC NEws: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/911-...m-cpr-18640828
    NBC: http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/lo...194588781.html

    I would of given CPR regardless
    Not that I'm defending the policy, but I read not long ago that most elderly CPR recipients receive broken ribcages and little else.

    I'm not defending the nurse or the policy... I'm just stating there might be a reason for said policy.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by RICH1471 View Post
    That is fucked up, I would have done CPR regardless.
    Then I feel sorry for anyone you might know that wanted to die in peace rather than have continued suffering.
    when all else fails, read the STICKIES.

  8. #8
    I really doubt there was a DNR the media would have been all over that. I'd give up my job to preform CPR on someone should they need it.
    "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." -Friedrich Nietzsche

  9. #9
    The Insane DeltrusDisc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybourne View Post
    Jeeze....imagine that. You'd rather let someone die than break the rules.
    Not only that but her daughter thought it was satisfactory? Wow. I'd be flipping a crap if I knew someone could have saved my mother's life but didn't. Jeez.
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Blood fox View Post
    I really doubt there was a DNR the media would have been all over that. I'd give up my job to preform CPR on someone should they need it.
    You give the media to much credit. They want to get everyone's attention and to do so, they would gladly omit such information as a DNR order. Also, can you imagine all the legal issues the nurse could have with the insurance agency and other ramifications? It could have ruined that nurse's career and life if she had violated the policy.
    when all else fails, read the STICKIES.

  11. #11
    I have little faith in the human race, simple minded people who can't recognize right from rule.

    It sickens me to know there are people in the world who can WATCH someone die simply because they don't want to lose their job. It's equally as sick that health companies will FIRE staff after saving a life.


    It goes along the lines of hospitals refusing to service someone who collapses outside their doors, staff may not leave the premise to bring the individual inside. The individual must bring themselves in or someone off staff must do it or people will lose jobs


    We live in a sick world people.

    5.2 Disc Priest Guide | Retired(Playing Aion)

  12. #12
    That's just disgusting...
    Testing: Will probably be toooooo big.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Laize View Post
    Not that I'm defending the policy, but I read not long ago that most elderly CPR recipients receive broken ribcages and little else.

    I'm not defending the nurse or the policy... I'm just stating there might be a reason for said policy.
    they should have had a mobile defibrillator then, obviously they didn't ( which is a mistake in the first place) then CPR was the best option

    Quote Originally Posted by Flatspriest View Post
    Then I feel sorry for anyone you might know that wanted to die in peace rather than have continued suffering.
    you have got to be kidding me right? do you have any idea how horrible it is to be striving for air and it not coming? Have you and Idea how painful that is?

    Repertory failure is NOT a peaceful death the the slightest.

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-03 at 09:42 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Flatspriest View Post
    You give the media to much credit. They want to get everyone's attention and to do so, they would gladly omit such information as a DNR order. Also, can you imagine all the legal issues the nurse could have with the insurance agency and other ramifications? It could have ruined that nurse's career and life if she had violated the policy.
    the company's press statement said nothing of a DNR just their policy
    "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." -Friedrich Nietzsche

  14. #14
    One of the first things they taught me during CPR class was that the act of performing CPS can break the ribs of even a healthy man. It would go to reason that CPR would be just as dangerous to an elderly person.

    That said I suspect the "rule" is in effect because, at some prior time, CPR was administered and the home was sue'd over it. Most likely because of injuries sustained during the act of performing CPR. I'm also sure that the family involved was notified of all the policies when they chose that home.

    People may not like the policy. But it's one of the few remaining options that home has in a society where the answer to everything, no matter how trivial, is to sue.

  15. #15
    Tort Reform. We need it so badly.

    I'm surprised even so, as most states have good Samaritan laws that would protect the nurse. As long as she acted in good conscience and within the bounds of her training she "should" have been safe from being sued.
    I sat alone in the dark one night, tuning in by remote.
    I found a preacher who spoke of the light, but there was Brimstone in his throat.
    He'd show me the way, according to him, in return for my personal check.
    I flipped my channel back to CNN and lit another cigarette.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ovm33 View Post
    Tort Reform. We need it so badly.

    I'm surprised even so, as most states have good Samaritan laws that would protect the nurse. As long as she acted in good conscience and within the bounds of her training she "should" have been safe from being sued.
    Those good samaritan laws do not apply to someone who works at, and is under contract, to such a facility with policies in place.
    when all else fails, read the STICKIES.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Blood fox View Post
    they should have had a mobile defibrillator then, obviously they didn't ( which is a mistake in the first place) then CPR was the best option



    you have got to be kidding me right? do you have any idea how horrible it is to be striving for air and it not coming? Have you and Idea how painful that is?

    Repertory failure is NOT a peaceful death the the slightest.

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-03 at 09:42 PM ----------



    the company's press statement said nothing of a DNR just their policy
    well *if* she had a DNR that is her choice to make

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-03 at 09:47 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Twotonsteak View Post
    One of the first things they taught me during CPR class was that the act of performing CPS can break the ribs of even a healthy man. It would go to reason that CPR would be just as dangerous to an elderly person.

    That said I suspect the "rule" is in effect because, at some prior time, CPR was administered and the home was sue'd over it. Most likely because of injuries sustained during the act of performing CPR. I'm also sure that the family involved was notified of all the policies when they chose that home.

    People may not like the policy. But it's one of the few remaining options that home has in a society where the answer to everything, no matter how trivial, is to sue.
    ding ding ding, we have a winner, someone that is actually logical.

    I love all the people saying "O MAN I'D THROW AWAY MY JOB AND CAREER THAT I SPENT THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS IN SCHOOLING TO GET TO SAVE THE DAY BETTY .. ALSO TO GET SUED LOL!" ok buds, go do that.

  18. #18
    Should listen to the audio. I think the 911 operator lost her faith in humanity after the caller refused to do anything or get any innocent bystander to do something.

  19. #19
    There must be a reason why this rule was set in the first place.
    Until we know the real reason, there is no way to judge the nurse.

    Btw, here in germany it would not be possible to refuse CPR because of some company's rule. You could be sentenced for up to one year in prison.

  20. #20
    It's a retirement home. People go there to die. The family obviously knew the DNR protocol was a part of the facility.

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