1. #1

    I bought a PSU from the US and I'm living in a country that uses 240V wall socket

    Hi.

    So I live in the Middle-East and we use 240v/50Hz wall socket as opposed to 120v/60Hz or however much the US uses.

    I bought a PSU from Amazon.com which I imagine would ship with an "American-style" plug which would probably not fit on our wall sockets.

    I was wondering could I use a step-up transformer to fix this problem or would this harm the PSU?

    I'd probably try it with just the PSU plugged in without plugging the PSU into anything to reduce "hardware casualties" if a fault were to happen.

    We have to use transformers to play Xbox here because the plugs don't fit into our sockets.

    So what do you guys think? Will a transformer work with a PSU or how can this dilemma be solved?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Googles View Post
    Hi.

    So I live in the Middle-East and we use 240v/50Hz wall socket as opposed to 120v/60Hz or however much the US uses.

    I bought a PSU from Amazon.com which I imagine would ship with an "American-style" plug which would probably not fit on our wall sockets.

    I was wondering could I use a step-up transformer to fix this problem or would this harm the PSU?

    I'd probably try it with just the PSU plugged in without plugging the PSU into anything to reduce "hardware casualties" if a fault were to happen.

    We have to use transformers to play Xbox here because the plugs don't fit into our sockets.

    So what do you guys think? Will a transformer work with a PSU or how can this dilemma be solved?
    A good PSU can handle both 240v and 120v. Some models got a switch on the back to switch between 240 and 120 most dont (they switch automaticly).
    You can check the documentation to see if your PSU works this way.

    The plug on the PSU itself is a standard plug (also used for TVs and monitors etc). You should be able to localy buy a cable for you PSU that wil fit in your wall socket.

  3. #3
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
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    A step-down transformer can work depending on what you get, but it's always easy to drop voltage but changing frequency is not so easy and can have problems. But if you want to go the Step-Down Transformer route that should work to but I've experienced problems with that but that's a different story.

    You can buy this Step Down/Up Transformer.

    Also what evilman said should also work depending upon your PSU.
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  4. #4
    Moderator chazus's Avatar
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    I imagine just buying a new PSU would be easier, and cheaper, than getting a stepping transformer.

  5. #5
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
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    Yeah most likely but I've found it comes in to good use from time to time for other things and since I'm sure he might need it for other appliances he has it might be a good investment.
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  6. #6
    I'm buying a SeaSonic G-500

    On the specs it says:
    100 - 240V (Max. 90 - 264V)

    So does that mean it will automatically adjust itself and I just have to buy an adapter and not a transformer?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Googles View Post
    I'm buying a SeaSonic G-500

    On the specs it says:
    100 - 240V (Max. 90 - 264V)

    So does that mean it will automatically adjust itself and I just have to buy an adapter and not a transformer?
    Yes, all you need to do is get a adapter/cable that fits.
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  8. #8
    Just use a different lead. They will have the same plug on the PSU end.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by evilman View Post
    A good PSU can handle both 240v and 120v. Some models got a switch on the back to switch between 240 and 120 most dont (they switch automaticly).
    You can check the documentation to see if your PSU works this way.

    The plug on the PSU itself is a standard plug (also used for TVs and monitors etc). You should be able to localy buy a cable for you PSU that wil fit in your wall socket.
    The only other issue I could see is if your country doesnt have a 3rd ground prong. I was in Japan and for some reason they dont have a ground and both wires are live(110v 50Hz). I had to rig an adapter to ground to the wall socket case for my surge protector to work.

  10. #10
    Mechagnome SkyBlueAri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Googles View Post
    Hi.

    So I live in the Middle-East and we use 240v/50Hz wall socket as opposed to 120v/60Hz or however much the US uses.

    I bought a PSU from Amazon.com which I imagine would ship with an "American-style" plug which would probably not fit on our wall sockets.

    I was wondering could I use a step-up transformer to fix this problem or would this harm the PSU?

    I'd probably try it with just the PSU plugged in without plugging the PSU into anything to reduce "hardware casualties" if a fault were to happen.

    We have to use transformers to play Xbox here because the plugs don't fit into our sockets.

    So what do you guys think? Will a transformer work with a PSU or how can this dilemma be solved?
    What a shocking situation you're in!

    ...

    That's right I went there haha
    OT I have no idea what to do sorry
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  11. #11
    Have you actually looked at the sticker on the PSU to see what the input ratings are?

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