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  1. #21
    I've never really seen it as an addiction, unless I'm addicted to having fun in an easy and always accessible way with friends I can talk to across the country/globe, in which case, I need to get to rehab before I OD

    Quote Originally Posted by -Zait- View Post
    I hate to be the guy that links dictionary definitions to prove a point. But I'm going to link a dictionary definition to prove a point.

    Addiction: compulsive need for and use of a habit-forming substance (as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly : persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be harmful

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/addiction

    Look up actual definitions before you go volcano erupting statements like that.
    This is also why I don't see it as an addiction, but y'know, since the media wants to call it that I guess we might as well play their game and pretend it could be
    Last edited by Xs; 2013-02-24 at 09:18 AM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Zait- View Post
    I hate to be the guy that links dictionary definitions to prove a point. But I'm going to link a dictionary definition to prove a point.

    Addiction: compulsive need for and use of a habit-forming substance (as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly : persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be harmful

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/addiction

    Look up actual definitions before you go volcano erupting statements like that.
    Using a regular dictionary to define a medical term is laughable.

    http://knowledgex.camh.net/primary_c..._criteria.aspx

    Try using a medical tool to define a medical problem. Note that they use drug as a catch-all term. You can replace drug with game and have the same outcome.

  3. #23
    Herald of the Titans Razorice's Avatar
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    For me, it's addiction.

  4. #24
    The Lightbringer Celltrex's Avatar
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    Since I play only when I feel like it, passion. Now internet on the other hand....

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by forwards1ca View Post
    Using a regular dictionary to define a medical term is laughable.

    http://knowledgex.camh.net/primary_c..._criteria.aspx

    Try using a medical tool to define a medical problem. Note that they use drug as a catch-all term. You can replace drug with game and have the same outcome.
    Still doesn't solve the biggest issue, there are no withdrawal symptoms from excessive gaming 'addiction', you're addicted to the chemical in your brain that's release when you enjoy yourself and have social interactions, which isn't considered an addiction

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xs View Post
    Still doesn't solve the biggest issue, there are no withdrawal symptoms from excessive gaming 'addiction', you're addicted to the chemical in your brain that's release when you enjoy yourself and have social interactions, which isn't considered an addiction
    Go read that link and you'll understand that withdrawal symptoms don't have to be present for something to be considered an addiction. Can you people please get some education and understanding of a topic before making statements about said topic????

  7. #27
    Scarab Lord -Zait-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forwards1ca View Post
    Using a regular dictionary to define a medical term is laughable.

    http://knowledgex.camh.net/primary_c..._criteria.aspx

    Try using a medical tool to define a medical problem. Note that they use drug as a catch-all term. You can replace drug with game and have the same outcome.
    All of these criteria stem from physical withdrawal. Also, I'd still argue that video game "addiction" isn't real.

    Tolerance: Does the patient tend to need more of the drug over time to get the same effect?
    The "effect" is fun and entertainment, so that doesn't count since this definition means a physical one like a heroin or cocaine high.

    Withdrawal symptoms: Does the patient experience withdrawal symptoms when he or she does not use the drug?
    No withdrawal symptoms come from not playing a video game for a while. You don't get the shakes, you don't get cold/hot flashes, you're not waking up with cold sweats in the middle of the night, etc. There are no withdrawal symptoms other than REALLY REALLY wanting to play, which doesn't count.


    Continued use of drug despite harm: Is the patient experiencing physical or psychological harm from the drug?
    There is no harm other than having something suck up your free time if you're too lazy and unorganized to prioritize your life properly.

    Loss of control: Does the patient take the drug in larger amounts, or for longer than planned?
    Yes, but that's from sloth and the fault of the person playing the game if they can't manage their time. It's not like they get a high from playing it and can't stop.

    Attempts to cut down: Has the patient made a conscious, but unsuccessful, effort to reduce his or her drug use?

    Again, if you have issues with this it's because your obsessed and lazy.

    Salience: Does the patient spend significant time obtaining or thinking about the drug, or recovering from its effects?
    There's no "recovering" from it's effects because there are no effects.

    Reduced involvement: Has the patient given up or reduced his or her involvement in social, occupational or recreational activities due to the drug?
    I'd argue that people that do this are already anti-social. And also if you count WoW or games like it, you're playing with other people so that counts as a social activity. Albeit a lazy one. (x

    So by this definition, I still hold firm that you can't be addicted to video games. Obsessed yes. Addicted, no.
    Last edited by -Zait-; 2013-02-24 at 09:36 AM.

  8. #28
    zait you can become addicted to anything, if it becomes more than a habit and equally an obsession then its most probably an addiction, for example, ppl who are addicted to shopping do so because they can't help themselves its a mental thing. but they already have thousands of debt and still keep spending.

    also entertainment IS a high, its called serotonin. you could argue that the gaming itself isn't the addiction, just being addicted to feeling good.

  9. #29
    Warchief IRunSoFarAway's Avatar
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    I've been playing games ever since I was a kid as well, and I love video games, but for me it's just something to do when you're bored or to pass the time. In my opinion, you're addicted if the first thing you do when you wake up is you start playing a game, and continue playing until late at night, and possibly early into the morning for days on end. You're also addicted if a game takes priority over anything in real life, such as relationships, responsibilities, friends, family, etc. Overall, I think if you can't go a at least a week without playing a video game, I'd say you have probably have some kind of problem.

    Now I'm not sure how this applies to a professional gamer(and by professional, I mean the ones that get paid, not just ones that sit around a play a lot), considering most of them probably play for most of the day, but it technically is their job, and I'm sure they get paid well with all those endorsements from various companies and all that stuff.

    It's interesting to see how far people will go to defend their addiction or obsession with something though, no matter how silly it may be, I guess it's another way to use all that free time. I think this will go from an interesting discussion to a flame war some time tomorrow.
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  10. #30
    Scarab Lord -Zait-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heathy View Post
    zait you can become addicted to anything, if it becomes more than a habit and equally an obsession then its most probably an addiction, for example, ppl who are addicted to shopping do so because they can't help themselves its a mental thing. but they already have thousands of debt and still keep spending.

    also entertainment IS a high, its called serotonin.
    According to this definition provided, an addiction needs at least three of the criteria to be considered an "addiction", and all the criteria stem from physical withdrawals. And by high I meant the high you get from using hard drugs. Any kind of "mental addiction" is just an obsession. It can be a problem, don't get me wrong, but you don't get physical withdrawals from it, and according to this apparent official definition, it isn't considered an addiction then.

  11. #31
    well if your just going to completely ignore mental addiction as some sort of stupid obsession then there is no argument mainly because obsession is part of addiction, and everything about addiction is mental. yes there are physical signs with drug use addiction, although simply raging over not being able to partake in your addiction is a physical sign.

  12. #32
    My folks think its an addiction, but its not, I don't live at home, I'm at college, I don't have a job and not from lack of trying, (I go home during half terms to work as well)

    I'm doing a full A level in one year, along side a level 3 course that's purely assignment based. I get my assignments in on time for the most part, I do my revision, I also train and teach 3 nights a week,

    I log in most nights, unless I'm going on the 360, especially this last month as I've ran out of cash, waiting to get the next installment of my ALG so I can actually leave my dig,

    as I say to them, which I'll say to you, I have no cash at all in my bank account, bills waiting to come out, and I have to feed myself, what else is there I can do in my digs, when I can't afford to do anything to go out?

    But yea, I am increasingly bored with the game, probably because I'm on it so frequent, where as 2 months ago it as only a few nights a week, and I'd be out with mates in cinemas etc

  13. #33
    when gaming comes into the way of doing more important stuff it is an addiction.

    Under modern society standards one must be responsible for his well living and his familys. When you skip work or school to play its a sign of an addiction. When you neglect your hygiene to play it is a sign of an addiction. When as a student you neglect your lectures or assignments it is sign of an addiction.

    Life is usually multi-dimensional. If your only dimension is gaming then it is an addiction.
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    The problem is warriors are not easy to kill like we were in cata and people are mad at that
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    Brian may answer differently, but I would say mages are hard to counter for average players but easy for great players.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Zait- View Post
    You are right on the definition (interesting, didn't know there was a bunch of criteria), but I'd still argue that video games aren't addictive.

    Tolerance: Does the patient tend to need more of the drug over time to get the same effect?
    The "effect" is fun and entertainment, so that doesn't count since this definition means a physical one like a heroin or cocaine high.

    Withdrawal symptoms: Does the patient experience withdrawal symptoms when he or she does not use the drug?
    No withdrawal symptoms come from not playing a video game for a while. You don't get the shakes, you don't get cold/hot flashes, you're not waking up with cold sweats in the middle of the night, etc. There are no withdrawal symptoms other than REALLY REALLY wanting to play, which doesn't count.


    Continued use of drug despite harm: Is the patient experiencing physical or psychological harm from the drug?
    There is no harm other than having something suck up your free time if you're too lazy and unorganized to prioritize your life properly.

    Loss of control: Does the patient take the drug in larger amounts, or for longer than planned?
    Yes, but that's from sloth and the fault of the person playing the game if they can't manage their time. It's not like they get a high from playing it and can't stop.

    Attempts to cut down: Has the patient made a conscious, but unsuccessful, effort to reduce his or her drug use?

    Again, if you have issues with this it's because your obsessed and lazy.

    Salience: Does the patient spend significant time obtaining or thinking about the drug, or recovering from its effects?
    There's no "recovering" from it's effects because there are no effects.

    Reduced involvement: Has the patient given up or reduced his or her involvement in social, occupational or recreational activities due to the drug?
    I'd argue that people that do this are already anti-social. And also if you count WoW or games like it, you're playing with other people so that counts as a social activity. Albeit a lazy one. (x

    So by this definition, I still hold firm that you can't be addicted to video games. Obsessed yes. Addicted, no.
    You're putting your own expectations and beliefs onto something. Callign someone obsessed and lazy when they might be suffering from an addiction is ignorant. I bet if ypu talked to most Wow players who would fall under the medical definition of addicted, they would say that they need to playway more now than they did when they first started.

    I can guarantee that there are people out there who experience physical withdrawal symptos when they try to quit WoW. I am one of them

    There are a ton of people who experience both physical and psychological harm from being addicted to WoW. Belittling them and calling them lazy or unorganized is ignorant and hilights your lack of understanding ont he topic. By your definition, people addicted to crack who experience either are just too lazy or unorganized to use crack in a better way.

    Same arguement for the next point you try to make. You're projecting your value system into something you don't understand. Try thinking before you speak.

    Again, same arguement.

    You state that there are no "effects", but you conveniently ignore the first half of the question. "Does the patient spend significant time obtaining or thinking about the drug"? Again, if you talk to any player who would be considered addicted by the proper criteria, I can guarantee you they think about the game all the time. And they spend significant amounts of time "obtaining" (logged into) the game.

    As for your last point, I agree with a part of it. WoW CAN BE a very social. But, if you're ignoring other social,occupational or recreational activities to play WoW, then this criteria is apt. Example - you call in sick to work to play the new expansion, you miss football practice because ou want to get home and raid, or you cancel goign out with your friends to do RBG's. These are just a few examples.

    All in all, your arguements show a shocking lack of understanding into addictions. I suggest you think about thigs and get some real education before spouting off these type if ignorant remarks.

    The real problem is that addiction is not well understoon by general society, and that lack of understanding causes a great deal of controversy. People don't see how a video game can be addicting, but it is based on the reward system. WoW is so addicting for the very same reason that slot machines are addicting. They operate onthe inconsistent-intermittent reward system which has been proven by a crapton of research to be the most addicting reward system out there.

    ---------- Post added 2013-02-24 at 09:56 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by -Zait- View Post
    According to this definition provided, an addiction needs at least three of the criteria to be considered an "addiction", and all the criteria stem from physical withdrawals. And by high I meant the high you get from using hard drugs. Any kind of "mental addiction" is just an obsession. It can be a problem, don't get me wrong, but you don't get physical withdrawals from it, and according to this apparent official definition, it isn't considered an addiction then.
    This statement just shows how ignorant and biased you are on the subject. Please, do us all a favor and go learn about the subject before posting inflammatory comments like this. The criteria do not stem from hysical withdrawals. Thats why physical withdrawals have their own category. And you clearly don't understand how "hard"" drugs work, because if you did, you'd realize that many "hard drugs" are so addictive becasue of how that alter brain chemistry - usually by boosting a specific neurotransmitter, generally seretonin or dopamine. There are many activities that do the same thing naturally, and can be addictive. Sports, gaming, gambling, just about anything can be addicting. It really depends on how it affects the person. And I find it funny that you use "hard drugs" in your arguement, as if they're the only thing that someoen can be addicted to. Heres a list of things that are considered addivtions that have nothign to do with "hard drugs": gambling,alcohol, chocolate, food, sports, running, sex, watching tv, etc.
    Last edited by forwards1ca; 2013-02-24 at 10:12 AM.

  15. #35
    Herald of the Titans Lilija's Avatar
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    Every passion is an addiction and there is absolutly nothing wrong about it. The problem starts when things in your life go out of balance.

    Anyway, I've been thru exactly the same with my parrents and as I know they will never understand at least they've got used to it. And me getting a stable job took them mostly out of my back. Tho my dad still tends to call me mid raid and starts with "You're playing again? Go watch some TV" but I know he is only messing with me this way :P

  16. #36
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    When I very first started online gaming on a console I became addicted, I stopped doing schoolwork ( I was home tutored ) and instead stayed up to 7 or 8 am gaming, if then go to sleep and wake up at like 6pm and repeat, this was when I started playing CoD4 when WaW came out it wasn't as good, so I slowly stopped playing, and then I discovered WoW, and ever since gaming went from an addiction to a hobby, I know I could easily get addicted if I let myself go, somtime il stay up to 3am and then I realise, whoa whoa slow down, but I see it also as a stress released or me, like escapism from the stressful day I might of had.

    Oh and occasionally my family likes to call me, geek, anarak and similar jibes, which I must admit hurt me, my hobby and passion is gaming, why should i be any different from anybody elses hobby?
    Last edited by Conor; 2013-02-24 at 10:08 AM.
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  17. #37
    Herald of the Titans Lilija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kreeshak View Post
    Under modern society standards one must be responsible for his well living and his familys. When you skip work or school to play its a sign of an addiction. When you neglect your hygiene to play it is a sign of an addiction. When as a student you neglect your lectures or assignments it is sign of an addiction.
    Actually, those are more likely signs of a depression rather than addiction. Spending too much time in front of PC the same as spending too much time in front of TV is a symptom rather than a reason itself. Gaming on its own can really only make you to do that occassionally but not for longer. Also, there are other disorders that might resemble addition but aren't really it. More likely it's escapism or obsession.

    There was a time then I had a problem and I did spend too much time in front of PC (not even playing most of the time). People who don't understand the issue said it's an addiction. Specialists who eventually helped me discarded addiction quit fast and showed the problem being elsewhere, which was the start of getting me better.

    The thing is calling gaming addition in term of mental disorder is most often the biggest harm you can do to a person who has some other problem that causes them to spend to much time in front of PC. Furthermore, you won't really get results if you try to treat this kind of person as an addict - quite the opposite you will only add to their problem.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilija View Post
    Actually, those are more likely signs of a depression rather than addiction. Spending too much time in front of PC the same as spending too much time in front of TV is a symptom rather than a reason itself. Gaming on its own can really only make you to do that occassionally but not for longer. Also, there are other disorders that might resemble addition but aren't really it. More likely it's escapism or obsession.

    There was a time then I had a problem and I did spend too much time in front of PC (not even playing most of the time). People who don't understand the issue said it's an addiction. Specialists who eventually helped me discarded addiction quit fast and showed the problem being elsewhere, which was the start of getting me better.

    The thing is calling gaming addition in term of mental disorder is most often the biggest harm you can do to a person who has some other problem that causes them to spend to much time in front of PC. Furthermore, you won't really get results if you try to treat this kind of person as an addict - quite the opposite you will only add to their problem.
    Actually, you're completely worng. They can be symptoms of either, but depression has its own set of criteria that are completely different from addcition. Calling it a symptom rather than a reason doesn't make any sense. Illness is DEFINED by its symptoms. By definition, you weren't addicted to gaming because you weren't gaming. If you spent all your time in front of your computer gaming, then your diagnosis would be different, trust me. Before you try to use your anecdotal evidence as proof of something, I suggest you go to the page I linked, because it went to what psychiatrists and specialists use to define addiction.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkm View Post
    I love gaming. I been gaming ever since I was a kid and I don't see myself stopping any time soon. But my family looks at it like it's an addiction and you are grown up why you still playing blah blah. They don't realise what gaming is now days and how people feel about it. Yes, I have tried explaining this to them but my folks are the type that don't believe in what they don't know.

    So what do you guys think? What do you gamers see yourself as? Does your family and friends understand this?
    I dont want to sound dick but yes, your family is painfully wrong.
    It CAN be addiction but not how your family thinks.

    Seriously getting tired of all this "games are for kids", "when will you grow up". Isnt avg age of gamer 25-30 or even more?
    What makes angry birds more acceptable than dark souls? What makes farmville better than harvest moon? Because its on TV instead of facebook flash game? lol?
    Reading comics, manga as hobby makes you more pathetic than reading books all of sudden. Oh and obviously people on internet are not real.
    Its just not knowing stuff, reading ""news" papers"" about stuff like this etc.

    Your family probably spends most of their days watching TV same amount you would with raid or other stuff.
    Most people who blamed me being addicted did too. Its just form of past-time, hobby, entertainment.
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  20. #40
    Herald of the Titans Lilija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forwards1ca View Post
    Actually, you're completely worng. They can be symptoms of either, but depression has its own set of criteria that are completely different from addcition. Calling it a symptom rather than a reason doesn't make any sense. Illness is DEFINED by its symptoms. By definition, you weren't addicted to gaming because you weren't gaming. If you spent all your time in front of your computer gaming, then your diagnosis would be different, trust me. Before you try to use your anecdotal evidence as proof of something, I suggest you go to the page I linked, because it went to what psychiatrists and specialists use to define addiction.
    Your page doesn't prove that gaming can be an addiction. When my problem was the deepest I had symptomps that with some creativity could have been taken under addiction symptoms yet it was not it. Addiction doesn't disappear when you solve an unrelated problem.

    Also, taken from a psychologist, addiction has become a new fashion latetly - especially in older generation. Parents blame their kids' problems on various addictions when it's hardly ever a case. Noone has ever proven than gaming addiction exists even tho some people are really trying hard. Obssesive gaming or excessive gaming can be part of various problems which are hardly caused by the gaming itself.

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