Thread: Internet Crash

Page 1 of 2
1
2
LastLast
  1. #1
    Field Marshal Heady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    75

    Internet Crash

    Hi

    So a few days ago we had a power outage. after that the internet havent been working properly, when i use the internet it randomly stops working and if i try to troubleshoot i get the message "connection between your access point, router or cable modem and the internet is broken.".

    If i reset the modem it start working again.

    Can the power outage have broken the modem?

  2. #2
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Heady View Post
    Can the power outage have broken the modem?
    yes, this is why it's recommended to use a UPS on all sensitive electronics, a power strip or surge protector simply does not work

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  3. #3
    Reset the modem to factory settings, download & apply the newest firmware and try again.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Heady View Post
    Can the power outage have broken the modem?
    If a power outage caused damage, a problem is elsewhere. And a problem for more than just the modem. For example, if the cable enters a building without a connection to the earth ground electrode also used by AC electric, then modem damage can occur. A problem traceable to improper wiring. That connection is often missing and ignored because someone says, "My electricity (or cable) is working fine. So wiring must be good." Only useful answer comes from inspection.

    Power outages do not damage electronics. Numerous other mistakes might explain that damage. Damage that would occur even with a UPS or surge protector.

    Now, start by learning what is defective. Some cable modems have a server page that put up critically important numbers. Most important are any numbers that describe signal strength or signal to noise ratios. Measured in dBs. Without those numbers, then every reply can only be wild speculation. First define the quality and strength of an incoming signal. A server inside some modems provides those numbers. Otherwise the cable guy must get same numbers using his meter.

    Low dBs numbers create symptoms you have described, But the reverse is not true. Your symptoms do not necessarily mean you have low dB numbers. Follow the evidence. Start with signal strength. First know what exists before making any accusations, assumptions, or recommendations. A UPS, at best, would only cure symptoms.
    Last edited by westom; 2013-03-06 at 02:51 AM.

  5. #5
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Power outages do not damage electronics. Numerous other mistakes might explain that damage. Damage that would occur even with a UPS or surge protector.
    a clean power cut off is not the same as a power outage, if you had an oscilloscope hooked into an outlet on when a power outage occurs, the last few seconds are filled with spikes and dips, (something most UPS's are designed to handle) a surge protector is nothing more than an outlet extender

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Now, start by learning what is defective. Some cable modems have a server page that put up critically important numbers. Most important are any numbers that describe signal strength or signal to noise ratios. Measured in dBs. Without those numbers, then every reply can only be wild speculation.
    actually, we're pretty good at wildly speculating(aka educated guessing), but since the OP is using the tried and tested 'turn it off turn it on again' approach to the cable modem, we know the problem is with the modem, any further troubleshooting is not needed, if the OP owns his modem, he can replace it, if like most people he is renting it from his ISP, it's their problem, he just has to call and complain

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    if you had an oscilloscope hooked into an outlet on when a power outage occurs, the last few seconds are filled with spikes and dips, (something most UPS's are designed to handle) a surge protector is nothing more than an outlet extender
    Does power cycling cause any incandescent bulb to dim or brighten by 50%? If not, the rumored spike or dip is near zero. Irrelevant due to what exists inside all electronics - including GFCIs and dimmer swithes. Those dips or spikes are normal electricity. Also called noise. Noise does not cause hardware failures.

    A list of suspects is longer. Including cable, bad earth grounding (which is different from safety ground), the cable company's distribution amp, etc. Foreigners get the jobs because so many domestic workers never learn how to solve problems faster and ther first time. Never learn the soundbyte even defined in CSI: follow the evidence. They shotgunned. It worked. So they need no stick'n education.

    Provided is how to obtain assistance from those who better know this stuff. Inspection of an earth ground can identify one reason for damage to that and future modems. Many would only replace the modem. Then assume 'problem solved'. Shotgunners cure symptoms rather than a problem. Also explains why shotgunning also promotes myths abot destructive power cycling. As if noise causes damage.

    Inspect the earth grouind. Get dB numbers from the modem (if available). Then eliminate both a problem and reasons for future problems.

    Power off to any modem is same whether from its switch, circuit breaker, or the grid. There is no 'clean' power off. Just another urban myth. All power offs looks same to every electronic appliance. Power cycling causes electronic damage when something was defective before a power loss. Cure the problem; not its symptom. And learn from the experience.

  7. #7
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Does power cycling cause any incandescent bulb to dim or brighten by 50%? If not, the rumored spike or dip is near zero. Irrelevant due to what exists inside all electronics - including GFCIs and dimmer swithes. Those dips or spikes are normal electricity. Also called noise. Noise does not cause hardware failures.

    A list of suspects is longer. Including cable, bad earth grounding (which is different from safety ground), the cable company's distribution amp, etc. Foreigners get the jobs because so many domestic workers never learn how to solve problems faster and ther first time. Never learn the soundbyte even defined in CSI: follow the evidence. They shotgunned. It worked. So they need no stick'n education.

    Provided is how to obtain assistance from those who better know this stuff. Inspection of an earth ground can identify one reason for damage to that and future modems. Many would only replace the modem. Then assume 'problem solved'. Shotgunners cure symptoms rather than a problem. Also explains why shotgunning also promotes myths abot destructive power cycling. As if noise causes damage.

    Inspect the earth grouind. Get dB numbers from the modem (if available). Then eliminate both a problem and reasons for future problems.

    Power off to any modem is same whether from its switch, circuit breaker, or the grid. There is no 'clean' power off. Just another urban myth. All power offs looks same to every electronic appliance. Power cycling causes electronic damage when something was defective before a power loss. Cure the problem; not its symptom. And learn from the experience.
    power cycling, power cut off, switching a breaker, or even flipping a light switch are not the same as a power outage, some idiot gets drunk and runs his truck into a road side box, or a tree falls on a power line, those are outages, and they can be devastating to electronics, as devastating as a brown out, just before all power is lost, voltage can dip or spike drastically, I've even seen it flicker on and off a few times before finally going cold

    it's really simple, the modem worked before the power went out, now it doesn't, it's not rocket science

    the rest of your post is just a red herring

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    it's really simple, the modem worked before the power went out, now it doesn't, it's not rocket science
    Insufficient knowledge also claims power cycling light bulbs causes damage. After all, a bulb failed when a switch was turned on. That proves power cycling damages bulbs? Nonsense.

    Concept were even taught in elementary school science. Power cycling damaging light bulbs is classic junk science. Knowledge only from observation. Observation also proved other urban myths such as spontaneous reproduction. And moldy bread breeds maggots. Same myth also says power cycling destroys electronics.

    Provided were a few reasons why a power outage might have damaged a (and a future) modem. And also why an intemittent modem coincided with or is created by a failure elsewhere.

    TTwo solutions exist. Shotgunn - to cure symptoms. Or find the defect before relacing anything. Provide the better informed with hard facts that would cure the defect.

    Modem may or may not be defective. Those symptomns are classic of many defects. Described is how to identify the actual the first time. How to get useful assistance from those with better knowledge. Also demonstrated is why so many who only learn shotgunning may even lose their jobs to better trained foreign competition. Would even argue about it rather than learn how to 'work smarter; not harder'.

    Inspect the cable earth ground. Obtain (if available) dB numbers from the modem's server. Either may identify reasons for intermittent operation. Both are examples of "follow the evidence".

  9. #9
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Insufficient knowledge also claims power cycling light bulbs causes damage. After all, a bulb failed when a switch was turned on. That proves power cycling damages bulbs? Nonsense.

    Concept were even taught in elementary school science. Power cycling damaging light bulbs is classic junk science. Knowledge only from observation. Observation also proved other urban myths such as spontaneous reproduction. And moldy bread breeds maggots. Same myth also says power cycling destroys electronics.

    Provided were a few reasons why a power outage might have damaged a (and a future) modem. And also why an intemittent modem coincided with or is created by a failure elsewhere.

    TTwo solutions exist. Shotgunn - to cure symptoms. Or find the defect before relacing anything. Provide the better informed with hard facts that would cure the defect.

    Modem may or may not be defective. Those symptomns are classic of many defects. Described is how to identify the actual the first time. How to get useful assistance from those with better knowledge. Also demonstrated is why so many who only learn shotgunning may even lose their jobs to better trained foreign competition. Would even argue about it rather than learn how to 'work smarter; not harder'.

    Inspect the cable earth ground. Obtain (if available) dB numbers from the modem's server. Either may identify reasons for intermittent operation. Both are examples of "follow the evidence".
    have you taken a debate class? i would recommend it, your post is full of so much logical fallacy that it would make a great example of what not to do

    if you want to be exact, the symptoms are matching to several things, an ungrounded coax line, a lower signal power from the ISP, EMI interference from improperly terminated lines

    but, when you consider that there was a power outage, not a shut off, and that the modem worked fine before the outage, and that cable modems are often powered by cheaply made AC to DC adapters that almost never have a ground pin, it's a pretty safe bet to say that the modem needs to be replaced

    but feel free to keep going, sure, you could take equipment out to the OP, and do all sorts of tests and narrow it down exactly, but in reality, an educated guess is about as good as you can do over the internet, especially since the OP has not responded to this post in any way

    do you honestly think people just "shotgun" (one n), what may look like a random guess is due to having enough knowledge and experience to make an educated guess based on the information given, sometimes there is very little info and we make several guesses, but at the end of the day, you just can't sit and hide behind "not specific enough" and you have to make a guess, this is why a typical (but not all) EE makes a terrible repair tech

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    but, when you consider that there was a power outage, not a shut off, and that the modem worked fine before the outage, and that cable modems are often powered by cheaply made AC to DC adapters that almost never have a ground pin,
    Nobody said anything about an adapter's ground pin. Why deny what was never mentioned? Insufficient knowledge. An adapter's ground pin is irrelevant and was not even mentioned. Insufficient knowledge is also explains why some believe urban myths about shutoff verses power outage. Makes no difference where electricity is cutoff. However many, only using observation, somehow know more. Will even become belligerent.

    OP has two choices. a) Swap good parts (ie the modem) until something works. Or b) learn how to avert future problems using simpler and less expensive solutions. OP is encouraged to inspect cable earth ground (that is not an adapter's ground pin). And provide dB numbers from the modem's server (if available).

  11. #11
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,655
    Cyanotical is right, when the power is imply turned off through a breaker or switch it's direct connection is switched to zero basically. When a power outage occurs it can flicker and cause spikes in the power being delivered to the house. Take for example of a car hits a power pole then the connections on that pole can be damaged and cause what is known as an arc and cause a massive spike in power, also with wind it can cause brown outs where the power cycles fast and can cause power surges. Yes breakers are designed to catch this but sometimes they do not as it happens in a fraction of a second and that's all it takes, plus remember the physical limitation on a breaker as it cannot switch to the open or off position that fast when more Amps comes in then it's rated for.

    When devices are grounded its not a a perfect protection method either. I've seen this first hand as an electrician myself and yes power outages can cause faults in electronic equipment if it's not rated for it or has no measures against it.
    Intel I5-2500k @4.8Ghz| Noctua NH-U9B | Asus P67 Deluxe | 16GB G.SKILL Ares 2133Mhz
    Samsung 840 EVO 500GB/1TB | 512GB MX100 | 1TB WD Black x2 | 2TB WD Black |3TB WD Green NAS x2
    Sapphire R9-290x | SeasonicX 650 | NXZT H440 | Asus PB278Q | Razor Naga Molten Edition | CM Quick Fire Rapid TK
    Asus Xonar Essense STX | Presonus E5 x2 | Takstar HiFi 2050's

  12. #12
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Nobody said anything about an adapter's ground pin. Why deny what was never mentioned?
    we can infer from several facts:

    digital power supplies are not a simple device, thats why you don't just put any old PSU off the shelf into a computer, they are not the same,

    AC-DC adapters are cheaply made, and lack many of the safety features of proper powersupplies, including a grounding pin

    when properly designed a grounding pin is used to dump excess voltage in the event of a surge, without one power has to go somewhere else

    now about power being the culprit:

    OP did not have problems before the power outage, that means we could very safely eliminate non power related sources of the problem, since it was the event that changed things

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Insufficient knowledge.
    again, inferring from experience and knowledge of how computers and digital logic systems work:

    putting both of the above together means we have reasonable support for the idea that a surge or dip in power either when the power went out or turned back on caused damage to the modem

    since the modem works for a while before having problems, we can look at components that are not initially used, but will get used over time, a good place to start is memory, as the local cache fills it, reaches a location in the ram that is damaged, and this causes either a halt or infinite loop (pretty much the same thing)

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    An adapter's ground pin is irrelevant and was not even mentioned.
    again, inferring from knowledge and experience, this is a field where you have to be intuitive, if you have to wait for hard evidence, you will spend a long time and a lot of somebodies money doing so

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Insufficient knowledge is also explains why some believe urban myths about shutoff verses power outage. Makes no difference where electricity is cutoff. However many, only using observation, somehow know more. Will even become belligerent.
    this is not an urban myth, the myth is that cutting power to your computer can harm the hardware, while there is always a remote chance, the odds are very slim

    a power outage, ie not from a switch, is a real and known problem, idk where you are getting this idea that it's a myth, but look into brownouts, and voltage regulators

    voltage on a standard VAC115 socket can vary on average by as much as 20 volts in either direction, but when an outage occurs, hundreds of volts can be sent down the line for a second or so

    or in the case of California in the summer, rolling brownouts can go on for hours

    these are not myths, but well documented occurrences

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    OP has two choices. a) Swap good parts (ie the modem) until something works. Or b) learn how to avert future problems using simpler and less expensive solutions.
    'A' would be correct, 'B' is pretty much what i suggested in the first reply, a small cheap UPS will work for a modem and router

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    OP is encouraged to inspect cable earth ground (that is not an adapter's ground pin). And provide dB numbers from the modem's server (if available).
    this just sounds like tier 1 phone support reading a line from a technical manual

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  13. #13
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    we can infer from several facts:

    digital power supplies are not a simple device, thats why you don't just put any old PSU off the shelf into a computer, they are not the same,

    AC-DC adapters are cheaply made, and lack many of the safety features of proper powersupplies, including a grounding pin

    when properly designed a grounding pin is used to dump excess voltage in the event of a surge, without one power has to go somewhere else

    now about power being the culprit:

    OP did not have problems before the power outage, that means we could very safely eliminate non power related sources of the problem, since it was the event that changed things



    again, inferring from experience and knowledge of how computers and digital logic systems work:

    putting both of the above together means we have reasonable support for the idea that a surge or dip in power either when the power went out or turned back on caused damage to the modem

    since the modem works for a while before having problems, we can look at components that are not initially used, but will get used over time, a good place to start is memory, as the local cache fills it, reaches a location in the ram that is damaged, and this causes either a halt or infinite loop (pretty much the same thing)



    again, inferring from knowledge and experience, this is a field where you have to be intuitive, if you have to wait for hard evidence, you will spend a long time and a lot of somebodies money doing so



    this is not an urban myth, the myth is that cutting power to your computer can harm the hardware, while there is always a remote chance, the odds are very slim

    a power outage, ie not from a switch, is a real and known problem, idk where you are getting this idea that it's a myth, but look into brownouts, and voltage regulators

    voltage on a standard VAC115 socket can vary on average by as much as 20 volts in either direction, but when an outage occurs, hundreds of volts can be sent down the line for a second or so

    or in the case of California in the summer, rolling brownouts can go on for hours

    these are not myths, but well documented occurrences



    'A' would be correct, 'B' is pretty much what i suggested in the first reply, a small cheap UPS will work for a modem and router



    this just sounds like tier 1 phone support reading a line from a technical manual
    Well it can vary by more then 20v even during normal operation, but yeah I've seen an arc that caused a nearby house to get surge in the multitude of a few thousand volts and their TV/computer and I believe microwave was completely fried on the inside since even though the breakers tripped it still happened way to fast. All it takes is a fraction of a second. I've also seen a wall socket that was completely black/brown from a surge caused by brownouts and man it wasn't pretty.
    Intel I5-2500k @4.8Ghz| Noctua NH-U9B | Asus P67 Deluxe | 16GB G.SKILL Ares 2133Mhz
    Samsung 840 EVO 500GB/1TB | 512GB MX100 | 1TB WD Black x2 | 2TB WD Black |3TB WD Green NAS x2
    Sapphire R9-290x | SeasonicX 650 | NXZT H440 | Asus PB278Q | Razor Naga Molten Edition | CM Quick Fire Rapid TK
    Asus Xonar Essense STX | Presonus E5 x2 | Takstar HiFi 2050's

  14. #14
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Iamanerd View Post
    Well it can vary by more then 20v even during normal operation, but yeah I've seen an arc that caused a nearby house to get surge in the multitude of a few thousand volts and their TV/computer and I believe microwave was completely fried on the inside since even though the breakers tripped it still happened way to fast. All it takes is a fraction of a second. I've also seen a wall socket that was completely black/brown from a surge caused by brownouts and man it wasn't pretty.
    that is crazy, what sucks is when stuff like that happens, often the power company denies responsibility and tells you to put it on your home owners insurance, and usually the deductible is either higher or just above the cost in damages

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  15. #15
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyanotical View Post
    that is crazy, what sucks is when stuff like that happens, often the power company denies responsibility and tells you to put it on your home owners insurance, and usually the deductible is either higher or just above the cost in damages
    Yeah its pretty dumb and in both cases they had to use their home owners insurance but since one was when I was in school, the school did it for free as training for us and the case with a burnt wall socket was my uncles house awhile back and I had to rip out all the wire back to the panel but luckily it was only that outlet and not the others that where after it or it would've been a lot more sheet rock I would have had to break up. That's why whenever a big storm rolls in I turn everything off and unplug my PC/router/modem and play my gameboy for the night or read as I'd rather not watch something go poof!
    Intel I5-2500k @4.8Ghz| Noctua NH-U9B | Asus P67 Deluxe | 16GB G.SKILL Ares 2133Mhz
    Samsung 840 EVO 500GB/1TB | 512GB MX100 | 1TB WD Black x2 | 2TB WD Black |3TB WD Green NAS x2
    Sapphire R9-290x | SeasonicX 650 | NXZT H440 | Asus PB278Q | Razor Naga Molten Edition | CM Quick Fire Rapid TK
    Asus Xonar Essense STX | Presonus E5 x2 | Takstar HiFi 2050's

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Iamanerd View Post
    Take for example of a car hits a power pole then the connections on that pole can be damaged and cause what is known as an arc and cause a massive spike in power, also with wind it can cause brown outs where the power cycles fast and can cause power surges.
    If power cycling causes surges, then AC electric (that powers cycles 120 times per second) is also causing spikes. Power cycling does not cause destructive arcs and spikes. It may cause other anomalies including noise. Those anomalies are irrelevant here and do not damage electronics.

    Electricity does not know nor care where a switch opened. Circuit from a transformer to modem can open anywhere. Makes no different to the appliance. Power is on or power is off. Any resulting spike is so tiny as to be called noise.

    Stray car hitting a pole creates completely different anomalies including a short from primary (2000+ volts) to the secondary (120 volts). Power loss does not cause damage. That 2000 or 13,000 volt short created by the stray car causes damage. Voltage spike even might be created by an broken neutral. In each case, that anomoly is followed by utility breakers opening. Then many, using observation, blame damage on circuit breakers and the resulting blackout. Many, using observation, ignore a thousands volt spike that preceded and caused breakers to trip.

    Breakers do not catch and do not protect from brownouts or fast power cycles. What do dimmer switches do? Create fast power cycles - shorter spikes. So a dimmer switch causes destructive spikes? Of course not. Sometimes spikes from a dimmer dimmer switch can be heard on a radio. Those sharp spikes are called noise; irrelevant to this discussion.

    Now, if power loss damaged a modem, then something else was defective BEFORE power was lost. Find and fix that defect.

    Iamanerd - nobody said anything about devices being grounded. Please do not deny what was not stated and is irrelevant. Safety (equipment) ground is irrelevant to this discussion and completely irrelevant to the OP's modem damage.

    If power loss cause damage, then a defect existed before that blackout. Two choices. OP can shotgun. Or the OP can provide some basic facts to first locate and then solve a reason for his intermittents. And to avert future failures.

  17. #17
    Epic! Iamanerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,655
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    If power cycling causes surges, then AC electric (that powers cycles 120 times per second) is also causing spikes. Power cycling does not cause destructive arcs and spikes. It may cause other anomalies including noise. Those anomalies are irrelevant here and do not damage electronics.

    Electricity does not know nor care where a switch opened. Circuit from a transformer to modem can open anywhere. Makes no different to the appliance. Power is on or power is off. Any resulting spike is so tiny as to be called noise.

    Stray car hitting a pole creates completely different anomalies including a short from primary (2000+ volts) to the secondary (120 volts). Power loss does not cause damage. That 2000 or 13,000 volt short created by the stray car causes damage. Voltage spike even might be created by an broken neutral. In each case, that anomoly is followed by utility breakers opening. Then many, using observation, blame damage on circuit breakers and the resulting blackout. Many, using observation, ignore a thousands volt spike that preceded and caused breakers to trip.

    Breakers do not catch and do not protect from brownouts or fast power cycles. What do dimmer switches do? Create fast power cycles - shorter spikes. So a dimmer switch causes destructive spikes? Of course not. Sometimes spikes from a dimmer dimmer switch can be heard on a radio. Those sharp spikes are called noise; irrelevant to this discussion.

    Now, if power loss damaged a modem, then something else was defective BEFORE power was lost. Find and fix that defect.

    Iamanerd - nobody said anything about devices being grounded. Please do not deny what was not stated and is irrelevant. Safety (equipment) ground is irrelevant to this discussion and completely irrelevant to the OP's modem damage.

    If power loss cause damage, then a defect existed before that blackout. Two choices. OP can shotgun. Or the OP can provide some basic facts to first locate and then solve a reason for his intermittents. And to avert future failures.
    Standard North American electricity is 60 cycles per second aka 60Hz. Also the OP only stated the power went out when it could have been a brown out or just that an accident involving the lines nearby his house. Yes I know the power from the lines goes through a Step-down Transformer to step the voltage down but if an arc occurs it can bypass that and still hit a persons main panel and can still hits connected devices in the house. Also dimmer switches are designed with to chop the cycles up so it doubles to 120 Hz (sorry if that's what you mean't with your first line) to allow for dimming. Other devices are not always designed for that to occur. Also the a switch/breaker etc. could have a faulty or stuck open contact and could allow for a small spike to pass through and hit a device with a voltage higher then it's rated for. Honestly we can sit here and debate but until we get better details from the OP or someone can troubleshoot it themselves we can only guess.

    The OP's best bet is to get a new modem.
    Intel I5-2500k @4.8Ghz| Noctua NH-U9B | Asus P67 Deluxe | 16GB G.SKILL Ares 2133Mhz
    Samsung 840 EVO 500GB/1TB | 512GB MX100 | 1TB WD Black x2 | 2TB WD Black |3TB WD Green NAS x2
    Sapphire R9-290x | SeasonicX 650 | NXZT H440 | Asus PB278Q | Razor Naga Molten Edition | CM Quick Fire Rapid TK
    Asus Xonar Essense STX | Presonus E5 x2 | Takstar HiFi 2050's

  18. #18
    I am Murloc! Cyanotical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Aurora, Co
    Posts
    5,132
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    ...etc...
    okay, i will say this as bluntly as i can, dismissing information because it is not mentioned it wrong, completely wrong

    you are trying to argue that a lack of information means it's not relevant, which aside from just being wrong and very inaccurate, means that you are searching for a point of contention

    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Now, if power loss damaged a modem, then something else was defective BEFORE power was lost. Find and fix that defect.
    lets look at this statement, the first part:
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Now, if power loss damaged a modem,
    implies that the power outage did damage the modem, while the second part:
    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    then something else was defective BEFORE power was lost. Find and fix that defect.
    implies that it was broken before hand, which aside from countering the first part of your statement, does not go along with what the OP stated

    the problem is that with the small amount of information given we can safely make an educated guess, and your position that there is not enough information is incorrect, if you feel that any one of the other possibilities is more correct, post some reasoning why, not just some incorrect information about electrical systems

    i7-4790K | Z97 Class. | 8GB DDR3-2133 | GTX-690 Quad SLI | RAIDR | 512GB Samsung 830 | AX1200 | FT02
    Dell U2711 | Ducky Shine3 YoS | Steelseries Sensei Wireless | Xonar Essence One | KRK RP8G2s

  19. #19
    Old God apepi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Mostly harmless
    Posts
    10,412
    Quote Originally Posted by Gouca View Post
    Reset the modem to factory settings, download & apply the newest firmware and try again.
    I do not suggest to reset it to factory settings, some of the settings may be set by your isp and not by the modem maker and can delete some of those settings in process.
    Time...line? Time isn't made out of lines. It is made out of circles. That is why clocks are round. ~ Caboose

  20. #20
    Pit Lord Azerox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    2,438
    Call your ISP?

    I mean it can be that you have a connection to your modem, but not to the internet.

    Have a red cross in your right down corner (bad sign/broken no cable etc etc), have a orange exclamation mark? (read below).

    Newest modems can automaticly loging to the network, but not all > maybe you have to manualy setup your modem again.

    Some people also dont 'save' the settings, so when power goes down the settings are gone.
    Playing MMO's since 1997 ®
    Ultima Online > Everquest > Dark Age of Camelot > Lineage 2 > World of Warcraft.
    In between ofcourse all the other MMOs u can name. Those above spend atleast 1 year.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •