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  1. #161
    My first reaction/answer to this was
    Because here in America we have a lot more in depth and highly, highly professional criminal investigators/forensics/lawyers/and the whole infrastructure that goes with locking people up.
    Not to say we just lock a lot of people up
    But to say that, we catch more of them than other countries do?

    Your country is not as terrible as you may think it is.

  2. #162
    Scarab Lord Sky High's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigzoman20 View Post
    Mind forking the costs of making prisons exclusively publicly funded?
    well when we didn't have MILLIONS of none-violent drug offenders/border hoppers locked up, the publicly funded prisons handled things well enough wouldn't you say?

  3. #163
    I am Murloc! THE Bigzoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rorillane View Post
    My first reaction/answer to this was
    Because here in America we have a lot more in depth and highly, highly professional criminal investigators/forensics/lawyers/and the whole infrastructure that goes with locking people up.
    Not to say we just lock a lot of people up
    But to say that, we catch more of them than other countries do?

    .
    we catch them for nonviolent BS more then ever.

    If more murderers/thieves were in prison from say the 1980s your statement would apply.

    Your country is not as terrible as you may think it is

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-25 at 07:43 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Sky High Shark View Post
    well when we didn't have MILLIONS of none-violent drug offenders/border hoppers locked up, the publicly funded prisons handled things well enough wouldn't you say?
    Fair enough.

  4. #164
    The Insane det's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigzoman20 View Post
    Mind forking the costs of making prisons exclusively publicly funded?
    If companies MAKE money out of running prisons, where does the money come from and why could a publicly funded system not make that money too? I somehow have a feeling those company make money from public funds / taxes in the end. How else?
    Originally Posted by Blizzard Entertainment
    One cause is a cognitive bias called projection bias. Essentially living inside your own head your entire life makes it exceedingly difficult to understand how others do not also live your same life, think your same thoughts, and hold your same beliefs. In many cases it's quite frustrating to try to empathize and understand why you yourself may not be the center of the universe, which generally results in one 'acting out' in various ways.
    So, in short: the internet.

  5. #165
    The Lightbringer breadisfunny's Avatar
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    dont those companies have the prisioners produce products or services that the prisioners provide that the companies then turn around and sells for massive profits? i think they get paid something like 35cents an hour?
    Last edited by breadisfunny; 2013-03-25 at 07:50 AM.

  6. #166
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigzoman20 View Post
    Mind forking the costs of making prisons exclusively publicly funded?
    In this particular case, no I wouldn't mind. There are a few aspects of society where the benefits of private business simply don't outweigh the potential for corruption. For-profit fire departments might indeed be more efficient and cheaper, but it's just begging to be taken advantage of.

  7. #167
    Saw this clip on youtube, it's a comedy show in the UK but sort-of different from your average comedy show as they actually share a lot of useful information (Facts and such that you might otherwise have not have known for example)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc1gF...eature=related

    In a way quite scary, and kinda sad too.

  8. #168
    Quote Originally Posted by breadisfunny View Post
    all the first world industrialized/developed countries that have the death penalty would like to say hi.
    United States and?...

    Japan? Not nearly in the same degree as the US, since only multiple murderers or serial rapists with end on murder are sentenced.
    South Korea? Virtually suspended.
    Brazil, Peru, Chile? Abolished except on wartime.

    Who is accompanying the US?
    Not even Russia (a country whose democracy is dubious) has it, officially.

  9. #169
    Slightly off-topic, but note that approximately zero HSBC executives received jail time for knowingly laundering ~$16 Billion for sanctioned states and entities. The fine that they were slapped with amounted to less than 40% of the profit the bank made from laundering said money.

  10. #170
    Quote Originally Posted by Valerean View Post
    Slightly off-topic, but note that approximately zero HSBC executives received jail time for knowingly laundering ~$16 Billion for sanctioned states and entities. The fine that they were slapped with amounted to less than 40% of the profit the bank made from laundering said money.
    Sadly that is how it is all over the western world. Finicial institutions are deemed so important that a bank is very rarely allowed to bankrupt, more likely to get bail outs and when shit do hit the fan cos of their own shortcommings they get a slap on the wrist.
    If it was black banker, he would probably be in prison..

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-25 at 01:51 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by breadisfunny View Post
    dont those companies have the prisioners produce products or services that the prisioners provide that the companies then turn around and sells for massive profits? i think they get paid something like 35cents an hour?
    Yea US use a form of reversed slavery yet till this day.

  11. #171
    Its Simple.

    In the US the focus is on punishment rather than rehabilitation.

    Result Obvious.

  12. #172
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragelicious View Post
    Its Simple.

    In the US the focus is on punishment rather than rehabilitation.

    Result Obvious.
    At first thought to some degree but it is really more about profiting business.
    Profiting business > Punishment > Rehabilitation


    It is simply economicly profitable (for a selected few) to throw more people in jail than any other country in history and force them to produce goods without pay.

  13. #173
    Land of the free : )

  14. #174
    Unfortunately, the reason is mostly demographics/culture of those demographics.

    African Americans, and to a lesser extent Hispanics commit "blue collar" crimes (mostly to each other) at a much higher per capita rate than do whites and asians (who commit white collar crime at higher per capita rates, for obvious reasons). To counter the objection that its because of racist judges/police, it is not, as the racial breakdown in arrests/convictions is in line with what you would expect given the responses recorded for crime victimisation surveys.

    Whatever the reason for the disparity in crime rates between races is, there is no reason to expect that it would somehow be different in Europe if Europe was 11% former slave and 15% poor, recent immigrant. Since the crime rate and incarceration rates in states that are almost entirely white (Maine is 98% white, I think, though, not being american, I get confused about which state is which) and most European countries (which are mostly >99% white) are similar, we must conclude that the primary reason why Europe has a much lower crime rate/incarceration rate than America is the lack of troubled minorities. After all, despite the hysteria from some quarters over Muslim immigrants, they are what, half a percent of Europe's population?

    In addition, long jail sentences amplifies this: given that recidivism for most offences is high (ranging from basically ~0% for some crimes, to ~40% for assault/burglary to ~80% for most sexual offences), throwing people into prison for long periods will bring down crime rates by keeping potential criminals out of the general population. Even non-violent drug offences have this effect, although in an unjust manner: police effectively have the ability to send someone they suspect, but cannot convict of property/personal crime to prison without needing a conviction for those crimes, they can simply send them to prison for drugs possession. The net effect is that moderate difference in baseline crime rates results in a large disparity in incarceration rates.

  15. #175
    Poor = crime.. And guess what the US system does? it makes the majority poor.

  16. #176
    Scarab Lord Roose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by endersblade View Post
    You can cry and scream all that snotty bullshit about what's wrong and what's right, but it doesn't matter in these cases. These people made a conscious choice to become a monster. We are talking about people who go against all the rules of society; these people cannot be helped, nor does anyone but silly bleeding hearts really think they can. These are people who commit atrocities to others for the simplest, inane reasons, who see nothing wrong with it. Why keep them in prison? Why make them spend the rest of their life there, living on taxpayer dollars? I for one do NOT like the thought of supporting murders, rapists and the like. Do you?

    You stop being a human at that point, and just become a monster. You aren't worth saving for any reason. We have more than enough people to contend with as it is, why the hell should we bother supporting those of us who don't wish to fit into society?
    Holy shit. The monster is you. It takes a whole lot to offend me. Congratulations.

    You seem to think that the only people in prison are murderers and rapists. How incredibly naive. Tons of people in there for harming nobody else. Yet they are monsters....

    ---------- Post added 2013-03-25 at 09:47 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Valerean View Post
    Slightly off-topic, but note that approximately zero HSBC executives received jail time for knowingly laundering ~$16 Billion for sanctioned states and entities. The fine that they were slapped with amounted to less than 40% of the profit the bank made from laundering said money.
    That really is part of the motivation for this thread. Why are we putting so many in prison for petty crimes, yet letting the big fish off the hooks.

  17. #177
    The Lightbringer breadisfunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jotabe View Post
    United States and?...

    Japan? Not nearly in the same degree as the US, since only multiple murderers or serial rapists with end on murder are sentenced.
    South Korea? Virtually suspended.
    Brazil, Peru, Chile? Abolished except on wartime.

    Who is accompanying the US?
    Not even Russia (a country whose democracy is dubious) has it, officially.
    your forgetting china. i do agree that medicinal use for marijauna should be legalized at the federal level. not just state.
    Last edited by breadisfunny; 2013-03-25 at 05:48 PM.

  18. #178
    Quote Originally Posted by Masark View Post
    Yet the state with the highest rate of executions is still way up there for incarceration rate.
    Was also about to say a few Asian nations still execute for carrying of marijuana, yet funnnily enough people still go over there and smoke it. Deterrent? Bulls**t.

  19. #179
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigzoman20 View Post
    Area determines the effectiveness of judges?
    it can greatly affect it.

    1: area provides the pools from which judges are chosen

    2: in many areas judges are elected

    both of these things can contribute to judicial bias. a judge born and raised and elected in rural alabama is most likely going to decide similar cases differently than a judge raised and elected in washington state
    Quote Originally Posted by TradewindNQ View Post
    The fucking Derpship has crashed on Herp Island...
    Quote Originally Posted by Wells View Post
    Meet the new derp.

    Same as the old derp.

  20. #180
    Quote Originally Posted by breadisfunny View Post
    your forgetting china. i do agree that medicinal use for marijauna should be legalized at the federal level. not just state.
    China is... well... you know what it is. I'm writing from China right now, and the fact that i don't feel confident to say what i'm thinking should tell you how it measures on the "civilization" scale.

    Among the civilized countries, the US is alone in its use of the death penalty, only with Japan in second place, but with a much tamer use (compare, if you want, the death sentences per capita carried out in the last 10 years).

    Don't fool yourself. No other democratic country does it like this.
    Last edited by jotabe; 2013-03-25 at 06:37 PM.

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