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  1. #1

    Unhappy 1200+ Days Played. A Tale of a WoW Addict.

    Hi all, I started playing World of Warcraft Vanilla just the week it was out, almost 8 years ago. Since then, I have been playing the game almost 9 hours a day on average, and occasionally up to 12 hours a day when it came to farming. There is total of more than 1200 played days on all my characters combined.

    I was first led into WoW because I didn't had any friends, and my grades were failing in high school, and I had needed a place of solace to retreat to in order to hide myself from my life's failures. I received a very large inheritance from my grandparents who passed away, and I was thus able to live in seclusion for many years without having to worry about working or studying. In fact, I can still go on playing for another decade or so before I am finally forced to work.

    Since then, I have played every class in the game, and have 12 characters, of which 8 of them are level 85s clad in high-end epic gear.

    However, WoW has lost its charm ever since, and I no longer find myself capable of finding the game fulfilling. Back then I played it for the following reasons:

    1) There was an air of innocence when I played it, because the world was so large, and I felt humbled by the vastness of the world.
    2) Every experience was worth experiencing, and was centered at the present instead of the past or the future.
    3) There was no need to get epic gear, focus on DPS in raids, or find ways to defeat others in 1 v 1 or arena setting. It was just pure joy regardless of how bad I was.
    4) Every player was new, and there was this genuinely serene feel to everything around me. I was curious and excited to carry on adventures, so were everyone else.
    5) It was so realistic back then, that I literally found my life's purpose in whole. Everyday, I would get up just to play WoW.

    So for a year or so, I was entrenched in WoW, exploring every detail, and appreciating every moment. I found my self-esteem and sense of worth and awe based on WoW exploration. There was just so much beauty to explore.

    However, eventually, the original charm of WoW was lost, and with the exception of the starting phases of each expansion, I found myself doing the following:

    1) Focusing on farming
    2) DPSing
    3) Doing arenas
    4) Getting only good gear and items
    5) Dueling
    6) Showing off my characters

    The main reason why I could not quit, is simply because ... I have no other option. WoW has defined me. Everything in WoW has become a substitute for things in real life, and I cannot get out. In fact, I get the following from playing WoW:

    1) Social Status: being a guildmaster, and being exalted to many factions.
    2) Self-Esteem and Self-Worth: being knowledgeable about all classes and most dungeons and raids, and professions.
    3) Profession: literally, professions across all my characters.
    4) Friends: guild members and associated members
    5) Fashion: my gear and possessions
    6) Money: my possessions and gold
    7) Need for Novelty: exploring new things in WoW, especially during expansions
    8) Entertainment: PvP, BGs, Arena, raids, dungeons etc.

    I have been playing WoW for so long, that I simply do not have anything in real life that can substitute all these possessions.

    It eventually got to the point whereby I just lost interest in WoW. However, with MoP coming up, I might regain that interest after a while. I am not sure what will become of me in the future, but I will continue to WoW, and more so when MoP is released, and for future expansions. It's not that I like the game at this time, but rather because I simply have nothing more which I like more than WoW.

    So this is my story. I cannot reveal my account or identity though, but I am saying this because of my own acknowledgement of how extreme WoW addiction has been for me.

  2. #2
    Hey m8,

    Start maybe hitting the gym slowly to start building ur confidence up again, even start off with walks if you unfit and build your body up a bit.

    Wow has never been so easy to quit as it is now, putting time into a game that doesn't reward time and effort like it used to is even more of a waste now.

    You've seen the sub drops this last 1/4 and I am sure out of those 3 million that quit in cata a lot of people were in your shoes. I know you will feel that you have put so much time into the game that you can't let go, but I am sure it did provide you with good memories anyways.

    Also think about how many great moments you've had since TBC and ulduar and see if that number has decreased.

    This game isn't worth the time anymore even with MoP where they adding meaningless filler content to try keep people online. The challenge is gone and if you are this dedicated to something use that dedication to do something you enjoy in the real world.
    Last edited by Crazyjoe; 2012-08-08 at 08:54 AM.

  3. #3
    It's not that I like the game at this time, but rather because I simply have nothing more which I like more than WoW.
    This is because you haven't lived much of your own real life yet, to put it bluntly.

    Therapy is always a good option, it's helping me with similar problems, though not specific to WoW.

    Start maybe hitting the gym slowly to start building ur confidence up again, even start off with walks if you unfit and build your body up a bit.

    Wow has never been so easy to quit as it is now, putting time into a game that doesn't reward time and effort like it used to is even more of a waste now.
    Absolutely this. To avoid flaming I will quietly agree with the second line of this quote as well as the first.

    Getting out of your comfort zone is one of the hardest things in the world when you've basically never done it in the past 8 years or so, but as they say, the first step is always the hardest. You're not alone mate.
    Last edited by Zolascius; 2012-08-08 at 08:55 AM.

  4. #4
    In Japan this lifestyle is called hikikomori. There sure are people like this all over the world, but I think it has received the most attention over there, as it is being examined since the 1980s. They have an estimated two million and counting.
    So if you get over the first step, that is admitting you have a problem and want to do something about it, you should look up information related to this term.

  5. #5
    Moderator Shamanic's Avatar
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    I would not suggest you return to MoP. I love WoW and it's very rare that I would say this to someone, but from your post it seems as though WoW is very destructive to you because it is giving you a false sense of all the things you have listed as worth. These things are not real, they may make you feel good temporarily but there's a fine line between being an avid player and being an addict who falsely believes the game is what's best for them. Clearly you recognise you have a problem, I would also recommend therapy or counselling of some sort to try and help you build your confidence and find out why you don't feel you can achieve these things outside of WoW.


    1) Social Status - try and meet some people. Join a community class or hobby where you can meet like minded people. Even if it's just one night a week of doing something organised with other people. If you're athletic, this could be a sport, if not, then you could get a qualification or you could go to a book club or a pottery meeting or I don't know, your local college probably has a lot of part time courses for all ages.
    2) Self-Esteem and Self-Worth - You should not need a game to feel these things. As you work on everything else listed here you will get these things back but honestly it may help to talk to someone about why you don't feel you have worth outside a video game.
    3) Profession - do you have a job? If not, time to get one If you're not qualified, again, you can do part time or night classes and try and further yourself to help you find a career. A job will also help you meet social requirements since you'll meet new people. No matter what your age, you can always improve yourself, and again your local community college is likely to have a careers advisor if you do want to improve your education to improve your job prospects.
    4) Friends - this one sort of goes with number 1 so I've already said a bunch of stuff on that.
    5) Fashion - whilst materialism is not an amazing thing, everyone should be able to feel like they like their clothes, their style and their possessions without bowing to materialism completely. There are a lot of steps you can take to give you self confidence, from as little as seeing a hair stylist and getting a few new clothes. Possessions wise it doesn't take a lot of money to do some research on interior design and with a bit of thrify shopping you can be proud of your living space. Start in small steps. If you're not happy with your self image you 110% have the power to change it. If you're not happy with your body image then it can be as simple as buying a workout dvd and committing yourself to it, riding a bike around to get some exercise or signing up to a gym.
    6) Money - goes with a job really.
    7) Need for Novelty - you can find new things in real life too, go to a website about your city and just pick one random thing you've never done before, a museum or a park or a pub or nightclub or restaurant or mall or whatever.
    8) Entertainment - movies, books, other games, I don't know, but there are waaaay more options out there than playing wow for entertainment

    If you want to change your life you can. It's no good saying I only find these things in a game - because have you truly wanted to change and find them outside a game. Forging a life for yourself is hard work and it's always easier to just say well I find all these things in wow so I'll play that, but that is a false belief - wow will not be there forever and the rest of your life will (well, forever for you anyway) so you need to build on your life and THEN play games like wow as additional entertainment and fun.

    I did not mean to come off as a crazy self-help guru, sorry!

  6. #6
    Mechagnome Sareth's Avatar
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    I don't see what the big deal is. I don't go out regularly, but I'm not completely disconnected from the outside and yet I can tell you you're not missing much in real life. You can both play WoW and have your window open, thus you're seeing real life. Call me ignorant, but stopping playing WoW just to go and sit in your garden for 10 minutes? No thanks.
    Last edited by Sareth; 2012-08-08 at 09:11 AM.
    'Lord Sargeras, sweep your molten fist through this world, so that it may be reborn in flames and darkness!'
    'So the light's vaunted justice has finally arrived.'
    'Boldly said. But I remain...unconvinced.'

    My Warrior

  7. #7
    1200 days played....my gut O.o I know its out there...but seing it inn a thread. Feels better about my 350-400 days played yet again.

    Thats an amasing number. Anywho I went and googled hikikomori, and read abit. Seems more as a form of depression than being socialy akward or something.

  8. #8
    Like someone said, it's easier now than ever to quit wow. Time to explore what life itself has to offer. Perhaps going to school or get a job isnt such a bad idea? A chance to get out of the house, meet none-gamer people and just get your mind on something else. Even though you aren't forced to since you got money to survive, it's for your own good. If you can't find the strenght then therapy might be a helpful choice. I guess being inside for 8years hit your real life social skills quite hard and the world outside might seem scary. If you don't feel certain about getting a full time job, or go to school therapy might help you with babystepping into being able to spend more time outside the home. Or perhaps study part-time or take a part-time job?
    Having a job or school is better for people than they might think, not just in terms of income and potential increased future income, but also that you are getting outside, socialize and do something with yourself.
    You hoped it was over but Murky is back
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Sareth View Post
    I don't see what the big deal is. I don't go out regularly, but I'm not completely disconnected from the outside and yet I can tell you you're not missing much in real life. You can both play WoW and have your window open, thus you're seeing real life. Call me ignorant, but stopping playing WoW just to go and sit in your garden for 10 minutes? No thanks.
    Judging by the way you conducted your post it seems you're also in a similar situation as the OP, just not far enough down the line to realise.

    Either that or you're disregarding life in it's entirety.

    I guess being inside for 8years hit your real life social skills quite hard and the world outside might seem scary.
    This hit me after about 2 and a half years of WoW, so yeah. The OP most likely has a much more cloudy view of things.
    Last edited by Zolascius; 2012-08-08 at 09:18 AM.

  10. #10
    Mechagnome Sareth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zolascius View Post
    Judging by the way you conducted your post it seems you're also in a similar situation as the OP, just not far enough down the line to realise.

    Either that or you're disregarding life in it's entirety.



    This hit me after about 2 and a half years of WoW, so yeah. The OP most likely has a much more cloudy view of things.
    No, not really. I have a normal life, in some terms. I'm looking for a job, I go out when I need to. Sorry, but there is nothing dark and sinister going on there. I don't go out unless I need to, because I don't see the need in pretending I like people. I don't want to be a dick-head prick and go out clubbing, I don't want to meet new vien and shallow people. I have maybe 300 days played. I'm not addicted to WoW, I'm not addicted to anything. I do however spend the majority of life on my computer because going out is pointless. If you could persuade me into going out without using the word money or sex, then I'd love to hear some reasons why I should.
    Last edited by Sareth; 2012-08-08 at 09:31 AM.
    'Lord Sargeras, sweep your molten fist through this world, so that it may be reborn in flames and darkness!'
    'So the light's vaunted justice has finally arrived.'
    'Boldly said. But I remain...unconvinced.'

    My Warrior

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sareth View Post
    No, not really. I have a normal life, in some terms. I'm looking for a job, I go out when I need to. Sorry, but there is nothing dark and sinister going on there. I don't go out unless I need to, because I don't see the need in pretending I like people. I don't want to be a dick-head prick and go out clubbing, I don't want to meet new vien and shallow people. I have maybe 200 days played. I'm not addicted to WoW, I'm not addicted to anything. I do however spend the majority of life on my computer because going out is pointless. If you could persuade me into going out without using the word money or sex, then I'd love to hear some reasons why I should.
    Fair enough. I was bluffing that time.

    For some people though it's simply just to avoid getting depressed etc, mental health issues and the like.. definitely not discounting social anxiety which is prob. one of the more commonly associated ones.

  12. #12
    High Overlord
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    I don't think you should completely quit something you have put so much time and money on. Just play less. I have kind of similar situation, the only difference is that I only play an average of 2 hours a day at the moment (more when MoP comes out). I think you should start with reading good books. It may sound boring at first but when you get into it, it is very exciting.

  13. #13
    Mechagnome Sareth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zolascius View Post
    Fair enough. I was bluffing that time.

    For some people though it's simply just to avoid getting depressed etc, mental health issues and the like.. definitely not discounting social anxiety which is prob. one of the more commonly associated ones.
    You could say I have some mental health issues in that I hate most people, but that has nothing to do with not going out. I'd probably be worse in that department if I did go out and see how fucked up everyone is on a more regular basis.
    'Lord Sargeras, sweep your molten fist through this world, so that it may be reborn in flames and darkness!'
    'So the light's vaunted justice has finally arrived.'
    'Boldly said. But I remain...unconvinced.'

    My Warrior

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by tomislav View Post
    WoW has defined me. Everything in WoW has become a substitute for things in real life, and I cannot get out.
    Games are games. They are meant to be fun.

    The moment you'll realize that Wow did nothing good for you (in the long run) is totally worth the efforts it requires you to stop playing. It's totally okay to be dedicated to a game that you love if that helps you. And that was the deal when you started this game. Great. But now it feels like it doesn't anymore.
    Don't kill all those wonderful memories you must have had with Wow by forcing yourself playing something that doesn't bring joy anymore.

    You think now that Wow has defined you, but it didn't (at least in a good way). Just the fact that you posted this means you are realizing this.
    You are so much more than you give yourself credit for.

    Give yourself a chance : stop dreaming your life and start living your dream mate.

  15. #15
    Try to pick up a new game to take your mind completely of WoW, and try to gradually decrease the amount of hours you play a day. Like people before me said, hitting the gym is good and will help you establish new routines.

  16. #16
    Field Marshal Meryk's Avatar
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    Tomislav, I agree with the other guys on exercising. Maybe create a Fitocracy account? It'll give you game-like goals to achieve with real life benefits. I was addicted to WoW for a few years from when it was released, I found my confidence drop and when I'd go outside I really didn't want to be there. Interacting with people was difficult and I felt like I was missing out on opportunities in-game, when really it was the other way around.

    Sareth, it sounds like you're pretty content in how you're living life which is good. Maybe you've just been really unlucky with the people you've met, have you tried going to group events related to things you're interested in?

  17. #17
    Well then you need to find a new challenge in your life!

    Easiest: pick up an old t shirt, a pair of shorts some old shoes, a towel and a copy of Mark Rippetoes Starting Strength, head to the nearby gym and get working. You will get hooked before you know it!

    Other ideas:
    -if you have enough money start traveling! Join a cruise, then some safari, or some expedition in Tibet, you will meet TONS of new and interesting people and have ALOT of fun.
    -do some studies, something chalenging and profitable like Law or Buisness management
    -learn some skills, like painting or dancing or whatever, you will definately meet alot of people and have many chalenges
    -etc etc, you get the point

    What you shouldnt do is waste money with "friends" and girls in clubs and whatnot, might be fun for a while but you will feel sorry afterwards. Or drugs, dont do that !

    My story is similar with yours, i have maby 600 days played around chars, and just like you sometimes i would wake up just to play wow. Lukily for me i had my parents and friends to show me other ways i can get the sense of acomplishment so i changed my life around somewhat, i finished college, got a job, joined a gym, i go out atleast once a week with friends, and so on.
    I havent played the game in a while and there are moments when i feel like going to the store and buy a prepaid card and pull a 48 hr marathon.... then i remember how booring the game become and it all passes )

  18. #18
    The Lightbringer Seriss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sareth View Post
    No, not really. I have a normal life, in some terms. I'm looking for a job, I go out when I need to. Sorry, but there is nothing dark and sinister going on there. I don't go out unless I need to, because I don't see the need in pretending I like people. I don't want to be a dick-head prick and go out clubbing, I don't want to meet new vien and shallow people. I have maybe 300 days played. I'm not addicted to WoW, I'm not addicted to anything. I do however spend the majority of life on my computer because going out is pointless. If you could persuade me into going out without using the word money or sex, then I'd love to hear some reasons why I should.
    I understand you so well. I do have a job, a normal job. I work on a computer, administrating and maintaining an online shop system and whatever else needs attention as the company is very small. I work around 9 hours a day, 5 days a week. When I get home, there's nothing that I'd rather do than sit at my computer, have the TV running in the background, hop on TS and play WoW.

    I used to go out... I tried. Really, I did. I hated every moment of it, so much that my best friend just gave up trying to convince me to accompany her again. I blame it on the fact that I don't drink nor smoke. I guess I could have stomached all those annoying people if I had been just as drunk as they and if I had had a desire to start that social smoking thing that seems to be going on with some people... As it was, I just found people horrendously boring and felt my braincells committing harakiri when having to indulge in a conversation >_<

    I just don't like going out. I have enough people around me when I'm at work. I'm happy if I don't have to see anybody anymore when I get home. People on TS don't bother me. If I need a break from them, I can just afk and nobody will feel offended.

    And playing WoW is still better than slumping down on the couch and brainlessly watch TV. Most often, I only put on the TV for some background noise.

  19. #19
    I think a lot of the loneliness that comes without a real life purpose is constructed by a society with instantaneous opportunities and participation in events that are open to anyone and require no real dedication to join. It is shallow, hollow and cheapens the community.

    The harder you work at something, the more valuable it is, even if it's asinine like building a self-model statue out of lego, or you decided to paint your entire house with the smallest paint brush around, because every stroke counts. (bow chika wow wow)

    But in the end, humans are happier being worked, just like dogs, they need a purpose. The more time you have to sit around thinking about how awful things are, the more your brain can rationalize things as being awful. People require constant satiation from being alone and they will do anything to convince their brain that they are being satiated. Via television, internet, whatever.

    That being said if I was sitting on a large fortune, I think WoW would be a very good way to preserve that fortune as it's very time consuming and cheap. But you should moderate your behavior more if you are unhappy. You sound like you are at least 20-25 years old, so it is probably time you pulled yourself up by your boot straps.

  20. #20
    Suppose I can relate to you somewhat OP.
    Have something like 500days myself since the game came out (nowhere near you I realise, but still quite a bit).
    I too as some others here have simply come to prefer the hobbies found on my computer, rather than the various drudgeries of "real life", as some would call it.

    Oh I have tried several different things suggested here as well.

    Like "go hit the gym" for example, that became akin to a gospel with the amount of times I would hear it from family and friends.
    So I tried that, several different ones over a time period.
    Came with lots of bother, such as buying new indoor shoes (yes they were very strict with that for some reason, and I had no old ones lying around, when would I have bought that?), and paying a monthly fee upwards of 30-40 euro per month to be allowed in (I kid you not).
    This is of course in Denmark, where everything is super expensive.
    In gyms I would largely (generalising here) see two types of people.
    Those who were already fit, mostly with friends, and those who were trying to get fit, often very quiet and seemingly somewhat embarassed to be seen there.
    I can reveal not much socialising took place, in fact people stuck very much to the group of friends they came with, or just with themselves, some even averting their eyes or seeking the emptier areas of the gym (or just plain leaving) if the place got too populated.
    This is of course anecdotal, just my own experience.
    After 3 different gyms I gave up on it. It was too expensive, it was too inconveniant to get there, and it was quite frankly depressing and made me feel even more alone and an outsider than I already did. To be quite frank it was also boring as hell, just staring at white walls and metallics while working out.

    The other side of it, to go out with friends and hit the local pub/night club or whatever, it seems that people who enjoy such things cannot fathom how there might be those that simply do not.
    I am not referring to anyone in this thread, simply to my own friends and family and such.
    My older brother would for years drag me into town to get drunk and dance etc.
    And so I'd go with him, to not let him down, and also to try and figure out where all the fun in it was. Surely when so many people enjoy it every single weekend, if not more often, there has to be something to it right?
    Now several years later I've just given up on it.
    Big crowds, loud music, the stench of beer, suffocating heat, etc. Not for me.
    The pub environment of sitting quietly with some friends and get a drink, maybe play a board game, fine, I can enjoy that with the right people.
    But that really doesn't seem very common in the mentality of this country. It is all about getting as drunk as possible as fast as possible, for as long as possible, doing as stupid things possible. I cannot relate to this kind of mentality, especially since I simply do not enjoy the taste of alchohol and thus cannot find any reason to drink it.
    And outside of the actual performance, it seems all people can talk about. "Yeah damn it'll be nice this weekend, we're gonna get so drunk!"
    Aye awesome, not only were the last 10 weekends spent like that, the 5 other days of the week are spent just looking forward to it, surviving the daily life.

    Now, I live with my girlfriend atm for 3 years or so, met in wow and clicked well immediately, moved in with each other after 2 years of occasional visits.
    My girlfriend before that, randomly met at a train station.
    Girlfriend before that, met in the local chess club (what are the odds?..)
    My friends are people who relate to my interests and hobbies.
    So people who play the same types of games, or who read the same types of manga or novels, or watches the same kind of anime and movies, or godforbid are interested in learning/studying the same things as me, or do the same kind of work as me.
    Nothing special or strange about that, my friend are found in common interests.
    They are found where I can be myself.

    So here's the deal OP.
    I cannot claim to play WoW as an addiction, because quite frankly I put it up and down all the time whenever something else interests me more or less.
    I suppose you could say I'm addicted to using a computer if anything. Basic point is I'm not you, so I cannot tell you what to do.
    However.
    You play wow, I suppose, because there is some amount of enjoyment in it.
    Any kind of enjoyment is fine, even if its because it makes you feel good about yourself and more confident etc.
    It is no more fake and virtual than people sitting on dating websites, people blogging, people sending each other letters, people spending 2 hours every day on facebook.
    If you want to keep playing, you should keep playing, there is nothing inherintly bad about playing a video game a lot.
    Of course, it has possible negative consequenses. Gaining weight, feeling lonely, losing touch with the world around you.
    And yes, these are things that have to be dealt with outside the game.

    If you just quit wow and go hit some pseudo-replacements that are supposedly going to fix all your problems (such as "hitting the gym" or "going out to meet people") then you will likely just burn your fingers and figure "okay I gave it a try but I want to go back".
    You seem to play wow a lot however, so there is room to cut down on playtime a little bit.
    Basically, you should start small.

    Meeting friends/girls etc, that happens everywhere, EVERYWHERE! There is no such thing as "this is the place to socialise".
    That can be done absolutely anywhere. Even while playing wow. Friends you meet through wow are still friends, the people you like and who like you in wow are still real people. They might be pretending left and right and actually be totally different, but the "real world" is completely the same in that regard.
    Facial mimic is just easier to see there, but people gesture so much in the virtual worlds these days that it hardly makes a big difference.
    This coming from someone who uses very expressive body language generally, I'm not someone who barely ever batters an eyelash and then figures "there's no difference from this and typing lol".

    Prestige is always artificial, it is always in the eyes of the beholder and the beheld. Take olympic athlets as an example.
    They win some pieces of precious metal for performing various feats in various types of sports.
    From where does their prestige come? From the people who look up to them, and the feeling that then creates in them.
    Noone can tell you that is more prestigious than you managing to level from 1-85 in WoW (even though just about everyone, probably even myself included, will do that!)
    Because quite frankly, if we all collectively decided tomorrow that there's nothing cool about winning the olympics anymore, but people who can kill rogues 1v1 in pvp are freaking gods, then gone is all prestige about getting those medals. It is completely artificial and subjective.
    So, if you get your good feeling and prestige, confidence, etc from playing wow, then don't you let anyone tell you it is fake and that you should "go out" and get some "real stuff" going on.

    Now, you express desire that you feel you play too much, you want to play less, maybe make some friends you can meet in person a bit more often, feel better about yourself outside wow and stuff. That is fine, we can work with that.
    What I personally did, was find a somewhat secluded natural area not so far from where I live, and a time where it would indeed be secluded, and then take a walk every day. It might seem like no big deal, but just getting outside in a manner that you feel safe with is a good start.
    I walked around an artificial lake, took about 1½-2 hours every day.
    That would be my exercise, and fresh air, break for my eyes after staring at a computer screen all day etc.
    Any type of physical shape can handle a walk, you just set a pace you can handle, and increase it when you feel you're ready for it.
    There might be people telling you "it will have no effect", but I can at least personally testify to having lost over 10 kilos ONLY doing that.
    It is not the means to an end, but it is a good first step.
    I'd do it after dinner, generally just before, or just after dark, and put on some music I liked, (or not, depending on how I felt that day).
    This will eventually bring about what others have mentioned, a routine outside of playing wow.
    Eventually you can monitor it slightly. For example, you can walk during the day where you might meet people.
    In such peaceful surroundings (say, a park if you have one) people generally recuperate and relax after a day's stress.
    It is a good opportunity to smile kindly at strangers walking by.
    Maybe others will exercise there regulardly, eventually one day you might stop and chat briefly with someone about "what a nice place this is for walking" or other such little things.
    I could go on for another 50 paragraphs about this, but this message is already super long and I'm sure you get the idea.
    Start small, with something you are comfortable with, under circumstances where you are comfortable. Don't let anyone else tell you some kind of minimum requirements you have to live up to, the most important thing is you build some kind of routine with something that does not include WoW.
    That way you will have an actual reason to do something else, even if that reason is just to fullfill the daily routine.
    And that is a start. You can work with that, and see where it takes you.
    It has taken me down to 100 kilos so far, into finding out I actually really enjoy stuff like hiking.
    It has also improved my relationship with my younger brother a lot, as I would eventually simply bring him for these walks, and we would chat and joke as we never had before.
    My family would praise me for my efforts (and the obvious visual results), I would have more confidence dealing with random people at my university, leading to even more things, etc. Hell, I even enjoy playing WoW more, because I do not feel guilt or "addiction" about it anymore, knowing how I do it because I want to, not because I have to.
    Good things can come from it mate. But you really do not need to make WoW the villain of your problems to improve your life.
    Everyone have something they indulge themselves in and enjoy a bit too much for their own good.

    That said, I'm very sorry this became such a long post. I guess noone will actually read the whole thing..
    Best of luck OP!

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