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  1. #1

    Been Working Out and...

    I've stated this a few times on the forums about me going in the Airforce for Pararescue. Needless to say I've been working out and I've started gaining weight and here's the funny thing, I hear a lot of people saying, "oh you need to be on a strong consistent diet to gain weight". I've come to say that's mostly untrue, hard work is hard work and I'm a normal eater, I have cut soda's out (except one time on a special occasion) from my overall diet and I don't eat 3 regular meals consistently each day.

    I have a question, I've been feeling in better shape and gaining weight yet I'm not on an actual diet. Why do so many people actually recommend those things when you don't need them?
    The Runaway. I love my new nickname. Is there a picture of me? Does it look good?

  2. #2
    I am not at all familiar with weight-gain diets (i sorely need to lose weight), but i would assume it's for the same reason: every drastic change of body weight and body composition requires a rebalance of the nutrients so the change stays there. Think that so far you were eating what was enough to feed a non-muscled body. Now your food has to nurture a body that consumes a lot more energy and protein. Also, more volume implies a higher need for every other chemical constuent.

    Certainly people have been becoming muscled just by working out since forever, and nothing really bad happened (the real danger of becoming nutritionally unbalanced is in "miracle" weight-loss diets). But if a specialist can check on you, better. Specially as you say that you never ate your meals consistently.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    I've stated this a few times on the forums about me going in the Airforce for Pararescue. Needless to say I've been working out and I've started gaining weight and here's the funny thing, I hear a lot of people saying, "oh you need to be on a strong consistent diet to gain weight". I've come to say that's mostly untrue, hard work is hard work and I'm a normal eater, I have cut soda's out (except one time on a special occasion) from my overall diet and I don't eat 3 regular meals consistently each day.

    I have a question, I've been feeling in better shape and gaining weight yet I'm not on an actual diet. Why do so many people actually recommend those things when you don't need them?
    Well what's a "normal eater" ? are you eating the enough calories to be in a defect to lose weight ? or eating MORE then you did normally due to increased physical activity ? OR on the other hand IF you haven't worked this hard or consistent before you could be experiencing what is called "noob gains" which you gain muscle mass at an accelerated rate due to having never worked them and the body is adapting to the strenuous activities.

    The diet or eating at a caloric defect causes you to burn off fat as energy to lose "weight" but in the end you want to lose fat not weight, But that's just my advice and take on it.

  4. #4
    Field Marshal Wiizper's Avatar
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    Good that you're not on an "actual diet" because to gain muscle all you need is a calorie surplus, and high enough protein intake.
    Now as a beginner you can gain muscle without any of that, but as you progress you'll need it even more.
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  5. #5
    Herald of the Titans Yilar's Avatar
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    It's easy to gain weight, but hard to lose weight. If you get your system adjusted to eating regularly it will not be as big a pain dropping weight.

  6. #6
    A consistent diet keeps your metabolism slightly higher for whatever reason. Your leptin levels in your body get use to a particular diet and when you change it you become hungrier as a result. Hunger is a big reason people deviate from diets.

    Anyone who tells you weight loss is simple calories in vs calories out over simplifies things. Studies show that metabolism (or calories out) vary fairly significantly for a lot of different reasons. Some are behavioral (you feel more tired so you don't exercise as well), some can be chalked up to the thermogenic effect of food, some can be chalked up to loss of body mass as you lose weight, some of it can be chalked up to less fidgeting, some of it can be chalked up to a difference in temperature production called adaptive thermogenesis.

    When you lose or gain weight, your body fights that weight loss/weight gain. Numerous studies show that people tend to have a basal weight that is "natural" to them. Some people are naturally heavier and some people are naturally lighter. When naturally heavier people lose weight, their metabolism is lower than one would expect for their activity level and current weight and the opposite is true for people who gain weight. The body does adapt over time and reset the natural weight but that takes years. This is one of the big reason people on diets yoyo when they lose or gain massive amounts of weight very quickly. A consistent diet allows you to keep track of your caloric intake and change it without having to guess very much to find your new maintenance.

    ---------- Post added 2013-05-02 at 10:35 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Yilar View Post
    It's easy to gain weight, but hard to lose weight. If you get your system adjusted to eating regularly it will not be as big a pain dropping weight.
    This is just not true. Some people have a lot of trouble gaining weight.
    Last edited by jbhasban; 2013-05-02 at 10:37 AM.

  7. #7
    Herald of the Titans Yilar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhasban View Post
    This is just not true. Some people have a lot of trouble gaining weight.
    That's probably because they try to eat healty aswell, which can make it hard. If you just stuff yourself with sugary items all day you'll gain weight pretty much regardless of who you are.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Yilar View Post
    That's probably because they try to eat healty aswell, which can make it hard. If you just stuff yourself with sugary items all day you'll gain weight pretty much regardless of who you are.
    Well people don't want to get fat... people who want to gain weight want to gain muscle mass. You are right that if you eat nothing but cheese and sugar all day and sit on your ass pretty much everyone can get fat. But if you exercise and try and eat a balanced diet, some people have genetics that prevent them from gaining weight. Their metabolism just increases. Their body becomes hotter. They exercise harder. They move more throughout the day.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Souichirou View Post
    Well what's a "normal eater" ? are you eating the enough calories to be in a defect to lose weight ? or eating MORE then you did normally due to increased physical activity ? OR on the other hand IF you haven't worked this hard or consistent before you could be experiencing what is called "noob gains" which you gain muscle mass at an accelerated rate due to having never worked them and the body is adapting to the strenuous activities.

    The diet or eating at a caloric defect causes you to burn off fat as energy to lose "weight" but in the end you want to lose fat not weight, But that's just my advice and take on it.
    "Noob gains" is not a muscle mass increases...it's your brain learning to utilize what it has.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    I've stated this a few times on the forums about me going in the Airforce for Pararescue. Needless to say I've been working out and I've started gaining weight and here's the funny thing, I hear a lot of people saying, "oh you need to be on a strong consistent diet to gain weight". I've come to say that's mostly untrue, hard work is hard work and I'm a normal eater, I have cut soda's out (except one time on a special occasion) from my overall diet and I don't eat 3 regular meals consistently each day.

    I have a question, I've been feeling in better shape and gaining weight yet I'm not on an actual diet. Why do so many people actually recommend those things when you don't need them?

    If you are gaining weight, you are not eating normal =P
    Last edited by gamingmuscle; 2013-05-02 at 02:47 PM.
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  10. #10
    By gaining weight I was referring to muscle mass, my body has started too look much more defined. I eat a consistent amount a day but it's not necessarily only decent food. A lot of it is school lunches (Meh), I do have pretty consistent peanut butter thing going.
    The Runaway. I love my new nickname. Is there a picture of me? Does it look good?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    By gaining weight I was referring to muscle mass, my body has started too look much more defined. I eat a consistent amount a day but it's not necessarily only decent food. A lot of it is school lunches (Meh), I do have pretty consistent peanut butter thing going.
    "Defined" != gaining muscle mass.

  12. #12
    Banned Zildjian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    I've stated this a few times on the forums about me going in the Airforce for Pararescue. Needless to say I've been working out and I've started gaining weight and here's the funny thing, I hear a lot of people saying, "oh you need to be on a strong consistent diet to gain weight". I've come to say that's mostly untrue, hard work is hard work and I'm a normal eater, I have cut soda's out (except one time on a special occasion) from my overall diet and I don't eat 3 regular meals consistently each day.

    I have a question, I've been feeling in better shape and gaining weight yet I'm not on an actual diet. Why do so many people actually recommend those things when you don't need them?
    You don't need to be on a diet.

    You just need to eat smart. The main reason is that trans fats prohibit muscle growth. If you're a newcomer to muscle gain, you're going to put it on quickly. The more muscle you have, the harder it is to put it on and the better you have to eat. Like weight loss in the sense that you lose weight fast at first, but to lose more, you need to cut more out or exercise more. Peanut butter is extremely low on the GI (glycemic index) and is a good source of protein so it's definitely not the worst food to eat.

  13. #13
    Peanut butter is a good source of protein? lol. No, it definitely is not. It's a great source for healthy fats though. Sorry for picking you out. I read this thread and it's full of some insanely retarded broshitscience. But pretty much every fitness related thread in this forum has a bunch of insane ignorant crap in it.

    OP is 18 years old, working out for the first time in his life, feels great. Shrugs it off as no big deal, questions why diet and exercise are hard or needed for 99% of the people out there.

  14. #14
    It's the newbie gains.

    Your body adapts to a point, but past that you need the nutrition to back up the lifting which is protein, carbs and a calorie surplus.

    Bulkers often recommend peanut butter because it has a good protein content with a ton of fat in it which racks up the calories and thus makes it "easier" to hit your calorie targets. Fat is your friend when you're bulking, eating "clean" (low fat) whilst bulking requires you to eat an absolute truck load of food.

  15. #15
    @OP: I can tell you a lot about lean gains, diets like intermittent fasting, bulking and cutting. Yet I'm fairly certain you have absolutely zero clue what you are talking about and you want to "brag" about your minor success.

    Keep in mind that gaining weight is different for people. After the summer during my bulking time (GOD I LOVE IT) I'm going from ~85kg to about 100kg without much of an effort. There's also one thing you need to remember. Working out without a proper diet (doesn't matter which one) is the same as plowing a field without seeding it afterwards.

  16. #16
    Banned Zildjian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravock View Post
    Peanut butter is a good source of protein? lol. No, it definitely is not. It's a great source for healthy fats though. Sorry for picking you out. I read this thread and it's full of some insanely retarded broshitscience. But pretty much every fitness related thread in this forum has a bunch of insane ignorant crap in it.

    OP is 18 years old, working out for the first time in his life, feels great. Shrugs it off as no big deal, questions why diet and exercise are hard or needed for 99% of the people out there.
    Natural peanut butter is a good source of protein. It's not up for debate. It's a fact.

    Of course it doesn't have as much as red meat, fish etc but for a few dollops on your wholemeal toast, it's decent. Nothing to do with bro science.

  17. #17
    Bloodsail Admiral Twoddle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhasban View Post
    You are right that if you eat nothing but cheese and sugar all day and sit on your ass pretty much everyone can get fat.
    That makes me ill before I have a chance to get fat.

  18. #18
    I've started pull ups... Apparently my arms don't carry.

    I max out at 8 as of today but I need to max out at 20 if not 25 eventually. Strength has always been a weakness for me whereas running always came natural I guess due to hereditary stuff and my weight.
    The Runaway. I love my new nickname. Is there a picture of me? Does it look good?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    I've stated this a few times on the forums about me going in the Airforce for Pararescue. Needless to say I've been working out and I've started gaining weight and here's the funny thing, I hear a lot of people saying, "oh you need to be on a strong consistent diet to gain weight". I've come to say that's mostly untrue, hard work is hard work and I'm a normal eater, I have cut soda's out (except one time on a special occasion) from my overall diet and I don't eat 3 regular meals consistently each day.

    I have a question, I've been feeling in better shape and gaining weight yet I'm not on an actual diet. Why do so many people actually recommend those things when you don't need them?
    Normally when you begin working out you gain muscle weight. The more muscle you have the more calories you burn daily. That's one of the reasons that discourage people from working out as you initially gain weight. That and results usually take some time to occur. While a "healthy" diet can help a little it's better to focus on working out, gaining muscle and doing cardio that way you can burn more calories.

    I really want to eat healthy, and I try to stay away from anything that has been cooked. Raw veggies, nuts, etc. But it's hard man =/

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Aang View Post
    I've started pull ups... Apparently my arms don't carry.

    I max out at 8 as of today but I need to max out at 20 if not 25 eventually. Strength has always been a weakness for me whereas running always came natural I guess due to hereditary stuff and my weight.
    Couple things that might help you get your reps up.

    1. Accumulate volume: While you are working out and do your pull ups and then you notice that you don't have the strength to do more you can do couple negatives or helped pull ups more. Also if you have anywhere near something that you can use to make pull ups even during the day when you are not working out you should do them. Overall doing even couple reps here and there during the day will help you progress.

    2. Mix it up: While I would recommend keeping the first set at the grip you are going to use in the test(to see the progress in it) after that you could mix your grips up a little during the training period. You could try close grips or wide chin ups or anything you can figure out. Now I don't mean you have to do every set with different grip but you should mix it up in every couple weeks or so, it will help.

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