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  1. #1

    What internet speed do i need to live stream on twitch?

    Hello,

    Im planning to start streaming twitch and wonder how fast the internet speed have to be to stream thru twitch for example at 720p or 1080p?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    It depends on a lot of settings, along with what game it is, but you really don't need much. I've heard of people streaming with a 3.5 MB up speed, which I'd imagine is pretty standard in most parts? I honestly don't know what the average is, but I'd say if you have a 3MB+ upload you should be okay to stream with it.

  3. #3
    Your upload speed needs to be fairly high, especially to stream in 1080. 10/10 will probably work for 720, but you'd need something like Verizon FIOS or similar speed to stream in 1080. Also, your hardware needs to be fairly strong to stream at that quality.

  4. #4
    3 Mb/s - 4.5 Mbs for HD — High definition 720p resolution video

    5 Mb/s - 9 Mb/s for HDX — Full high definition 1080p resolution video and high definition audio

    Would honestly aim a bit higher than that, if you don't want it to slow your internet down from doing other things at the same time.
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  5. #5
    Pandaren Monk solvexx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherb View Post
    Your upload speed needs to be fairly high, especially to stream in 1080. 10/10 will probably work for 720, but you'd need something like Verizon FIOS or similar speed to stream in 1080. Also, your hardware needs to be fairly strong to stream at that quality.
    Not so much on the computer side.
    You'll get 1080p from 10 up.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherb View Post
    Your upload speed needs to be fairly high, especially to stream in 1080. 10/10 will probably work for 720, but you'd need something like Verizon FIOS or similar speed to stream in 1080. Also, your hardware needs to be fairly strong to stream at that quality.
    Indeed. I tried to stream on Twitch with 2Mb/s upload, and not only was the quality poor, but it was stuttering like crazy - and this was with a tweaked xsplit profile. I'd aim for 10Mb/s upload minimum.

    Also, you're gonna want to look at having a hyperthreaded CPU. I can speak from experience that if you want to stream at even 720p 30fps with decent quality, you need to have a beefy CPU, and having 4 cores alone just isn't enough (I tried my 2600K at 4.4Ghz with and without hyperthreading, and the difference is startling). It's not all about your upload speeds, but about your hardware too.
    [...]

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Synthaxx View Post
    Indeed. I tried to stream on Twitch with 2Mb/s upload, and not only was the quality poor, but it was stuttering like crazy - and this was with a tweaked xsplit profile. I'd aim for 10Mb/s upload minimum.

    Also, you're gonna want to look at having a hyperthreaded CPU. I can speak from experience that if you want to stream at even 720p 30fps with decent quality, you need to have a beefy CPU, and having 4 cores alone just isn't enough (I tried my 2600K at 4.4Ghz with and without hyperthreading, and the difference is startling). It's not all about your upload speeds, but about your hardware too.
    Ill get a 50 Mbps down and 10 up can that run 1080p well?

  8. #8
    should be able to run 1080p, but as he mentioned you need some decent hardware to run it too
    Might also want to check if your internetspeed actually is 10. Most providers don't get nowhere near the speed, since it's a "max"

    http://www.speedtest.net/ if you want to have a look at it
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Terridon View Post
    should be able to run 1080p, but as he mentioned you need some decent hardware to run it too
    Might also want to check if your internetspeed actually is 10. Most providers don't get nowhere near the speed, since it's a "max"

    http://www.speedtest.net/ if you want to have a look at it
    I do get it on wifi and it will go up when i wire it. My hardware is good i thing a i7 4770k and a gtx 780 SC can handle it. A minimum of 720p i should be able to get.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Synthaxx View Post
    Indeed. I tried to stream on Twitch with 2Mb/s upload, and not only was the quality poor, but it was stuttering like crazy - and this was with a tweaked xsplit profile. I'd aim for 10Mb/s upload minimum.
    I think that it also depends on your ISP / Server as well; I have 120/12 and setting it up to 5Mb can make the stream stutter at times, when it clearly shouldn't.



    Ideally 1080p should be run at 6-8Mbps but you can do lower and it'll still be "decent" quality.

    This is running 3500kbps / 4200kbps buffer, Quality balance: 8 , Faster CPU Processing on OBS. It's okay quality, not ideal but not a huge fuzzy mess either: http://www.twitch.tv/darkwolfdude/c/2450327

    I could go through some other settings but it's like 4am atm so when I got some time after some sleep.

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  11. #11
    Scarab Lord Belize's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rucati View Post
    It depends on a lot of settings, along with what game it is, but you really don't need much. I've heard of people streaming with a 3.5 MB up speed, which I'd imagine is pretty standard in most parts? I honestly don't know what the average is, but I'd say if you have a 3MB+ upload you should be okay to stream with it.
    3MB+ is not standard by any means. I've recently upgrade my internet service and I'm getting 2 MB tops. With is fine for streaming at around 720p. Probably not full 1080 though.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yohassakura View Post
    I think that it also depends on your ISP / Server as well; I have 120/12 and setting it up to 5Mb can make the stream stutter at times, when it clearly shouldn't.



    Ideally 1080p should be run at 6-8Mbps but you can do lower and it'll still be "decent" quality.

    This is running 3500kbps / 4200kbps buffer, Quality balance: 8 , Faster CPU Processing on OBS. It's okay quality, not ideal but not a huge fuzzy mess either: http://www.twitch.tv/darkwolfdude/c/2450327

    I could go through some other settings but it's like 4am atm so when I got some time after some sleep.

    P.S. I'm running 3770k @ 4.5 GHz & AMD 7970 GHz @ 1200 / 1600 , 16GB RAM.
    I'd actually consider that fantastic quality, not just compared to the majority of videos I see, but in general as well. There's a little bit of compression artifacts around text and such, but not to the point of being more than 10 shades out on each colour (255 total shades per colour) and perfectly readable.

    I could have clarified that server choice is also very important, and that latency is a major factor, but I figured I'd expand to include client-side things that we've got at least some control over (even if you can change server choice, it's not something you can physically upgrade if there's issues -- you can switch to another server, but I figure we're going into another area).

    Faster CPU processing certainly does make a major difference as well. I remember trying to stream BF3. The difference between the default setting and 'ultra fast' (or something along those lines) was the difference between 20 FPS and an unplayable game, and 55 FPS and thus losing less than 10% of my non-streaming FPS (this is at 1440p, so at the 1080p most people play at, the drop would be even less and FPS would be higher overall). Of course my crappy 2Mb/s upload stopped me from carrying on streaming
    [...]

  13. #13
    Immortal Notarget's Avatar
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    This spreadsheet might be helpful to you:

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...TT240NWc#gid=0
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  14. #14
    As someone's asked for it; my settings in OBS:

    http://i.imgur.com/0VPGhcU.png

    The URL in the picture is the same as I linked above, and again: http://www.twitch.tv/darkwolfdude/c/2450327

    I think that it might be slightly better quality post-processing, I can't be entirely sure as I don't exactly pay enough attention to the stream while actively doing something (like raiding) which would cause the most stress on the stream.

    There's a small app to check which server will be best for you for both Twitch and JustinTV streams;

    http://www.teamliquid.net/forum/view...opic_id=326034

    JTVPing will ping all the available Twitch TV ingest servers and show you the average ping and jitter. Generally you will find that streaming to the server with the lowest ping will give you the best results (higher bandwidth and more stable stream).

    This updated version will fetch the same ingest server list that is available in XSplit, so future additions or removals of servers won't require modifications of the program.

    Download (requires .NET 3.5)
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  15. #15
    Does this effect you playing the game ? like would it lag the game while you are streaming?

  16. #16
    Just tested my net, 11.57 up, 61mb down, 9ms... I have a 3770k and a 780ti, what is obs and how do i download it? I may give streaming a try

  17. #17
    Immortal Notarget's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bull View Post
    Just tested my net, 11.57 up, 61mb down, 9ms... I have a 3770k and a 780ti, what is obs and how do i download it? I may give streaming a try
    Google my friend

    http://obsproject.com/
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  18. #18
    Is 10mb enough for multiplayer and streaming in 720p

  19. #19
    I realize that this is a necro by a 1-post wonder, but since we're here: can somebody please justify the claims that you'd need 10mb/s+ to stream video given:

    • While Youtube isn't going to win any quality awards, it certainly looks better than twitch at 1080p they're shipping out 4.5mb/s
    • While OBS isn't going to win any quality awards, capture to disk at ~3.5mb/s looks "passably okay, i guess" - and it certainly isn't going to be dropping frames or stuttering unless your computer was around during the Bush administration.
    • Twitch Staff say they don't support people doing more than 3.5mb/s for video (source)
    • Twitch partner 1080p streams are 1.5mb/s after transcoding source
    While increase bitrate before transcoding can allow sharper images, less blurring, and reduced artifacting, that's not going to solve the major problems: dropped frames, stuttering, stalling and falling out-of-sync.

    While it's possible you tried streaming at <bitrate x> and it looked like trash, that doesn't tell you that the cause was on your end. It could be your viewers unable to process video at whatever nitrate you were streaming at, that twitch's servers were bogged down, or that links between twitch and your viewers weren't performing well.

    If your broadcasting software isn't detecting dropped frames it's not your computer, and if you're not having throughput problems detected at your end then it's probably not your upstream bandwidth. If you can have twitch capture your stream and then send it to youtube and it looks fine (that is: not skipping/dropping frames) then it's certainly not a problem fixed by higher upstream bandwidth.

    While I could be missing something, I'd like to see some justification for the claims that 10mb/s+ is needed for 1080p streaming in light of what appears to be good evidence that even 4mb/s isn't supported by the most popular streaming service around and yet there are plenty of high-quality 1080p streams on that service.
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  20. #20
    Immortal Notarget's Avatar
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    I was under the impression ~5mb/s was the sweet spot which seem to match the caps by streaming services.
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