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  1. #201
    The Insane Bakis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg View Post
    Multiple nations acting under one military doesn't seem like a good idea. I mean, the UN is a coalition force and they can barely operate in my opinion.
    Depends, EU would be countries with alot in common.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ulmita View Post
    Did you read how US is trying to destabilize pacific (china-jap) area too? They are sending warships down there. We might be seeing a new military force being created out of those two nations that will counter NATO (with EASE)

  2. #202
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancing Minstrel View Post
    The EU isn't exactly united, especially when Turkey joins in. Cyprus having a joint military with a country currently occupying a large chunk of their island? Laughable.
    As if Turkey is ever joining? It won't happen.

  3. #203
    Pandaren Monk Ealyssa's Avatar
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    As a swiss I am against the UE (Switzerland isn't member of UE, for americans who don't know my country).

    But I would see an UE army as a good thing, at would mean that the UE finaly broke as it is today and became a federal country.
    Europe is actually a monstrous burocratic thingy. But iif they one day manage to have only one army, that day UE may finally work (it will obviously happen one day, I just hope to see it myself)

  4. #204
    Quote Originally Posted by Ealyssa View Post
    But I would see an UE army as a good thing, at would mean that the UE finaly broke as it is today and became a federal country.
    Europe is actually a monstrous burocratic thingy. But iif they one day manage to have only one army, that day UE may finally work (it will obviously happen one day, I just hope to see it myself)
    It will never happen. The EU will disintegrate in a few years.

  5. #205
    Pandaren Monk Ealyssa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cybran View Post
    It will never happen. The EU will disintegrate in a few years.
    Doesn't matter, really. Europe will at one point be a unique country. The only question is when.

  6. #206
    Fluffy Kitten Wikiy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cybran View Post
    It will never happen. The EU will disintegrate in a few years.
    Cybran, why do you always do this without giving arguments? I mean, I know the arguments and you certainly don't have to repeat them to me here, but it's simply silly. Someone makes a statement that something will happen and you quite often reply with "it wont". That's not very constructive.

  7. #207
    As a french citzen I'd love to see it. I'd like to see more integration.

  8. #208
    Quote Originally Posted by Wikiy View Post
    Cybran, why do you always do this without giving arguments? I mean, I know the arguments and you certainly don't have to repeat them to me here, but it's simply silly. Someone makes a statement that something will happen and you quite often reply with "it wont". That's not very constructive.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...9620AL20130703

    Coming soon after the near-collapse of the Greek government, which has been given until Monday to show it can meet the demands of its own EU-IMF bailout, the euro zone may be on the brink of falling back into full-on crisis.

    EU officials have been at pains to talk down any unrest, buoyed by the tranquility in financial markets since European Central Bank President Mario Draghi made good on his pledge last summer to do whatever it takes to protect the euro via a bond-buying program.

    European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso has spoken of the worst of the crisis being over, and the economic affairs commissioner, Olli Rehn, has often dismissed "doomsayers" who once predicted the euro would collapse.

    But despite the desire to project calm, EU officials quietly acknowledge that all is not well and that any number of problems could throw the region back into turmoil.

    "There are always issues simmering under the surface," said an EU diplomat who has been dealing first hand with the crisis since it erupted in Greece in early 2010.

    "It's far from over. The immediacy may have ebbed away, but I think we're all aware that under the surface, there's still a lot of stuff than can come back to bite us."

    During a meeting of finance officials from the 17 euro countries on Tuesday, there was agreement that the "optimism in the euro zone is not justified, that we are in worse shape than it seems," according to one source at the meeting.

    The situation in Portugal was a particular concern, said JP Morgan economist Alex White.

    "The announcement this afternoon that Paulo Portas, the foreign minister, has resigned significantly escalates our near-term concerns," he said in a note to clients. "At the moment risks appear elevated."

    All that is coming against a backdrop of rising euro zone borrowing costs once again after the U.S. Federal Reserve's announcement of an exit strategy from its money-printing program put world markets back into a spin.

    Portuguese 10-year bond yields spiked up to eight percent on Wednesday with reports of further ministerial resignations throwing the coalition government's future into peril.

    Portas has to decide whether to stay in his post or pull his rightist CDS-PP party out of the coalition, robbing the government of its majority.

    Greece, which has resumed talks with its EU and IMF lenders, is every bit as alarming.

    A privatization process, which was supposed to help cut into Greece's debt mountain down, has stalled and progress on public sector reform is faltering.

    Prime Minister Antonis Samaras has ruled out a fresh round of cuts, his government is seeking to lower its privatization revenue target after failing to sell its natural gas operation and there is a 1 billion euros black hole in the state-run health insurer, so its lenders may demand measures to fill that.

    There are some suggestions that the EU and IMF may refuse to pay at least some of the 8.1 billion euros bailout tranche on offer and dribble it out instead in order to focus minds in Athens. Anything more dramatic would be risky since Greece faces big bond redemptions next month and nobody wants a default.

    With German elections looming in September, Angela Merkel's government is determined not to rock the boat beforehand.

    CRISIS AWAKENS FROM SLUMBER

    Spain and Italy, two far larger economies, also major risks, as do banking sector problems in Slovenia, slow reforms in Cyprus and a scandal in Ireland that has shaken confidence.

    In a note to clients late last month, Italy's Mediobanca warned that the country would "inevitably end up in an EU bailout request" in the next six months unless borrowing costs could be kept low and the economy found some traction.

    Prime Minister Enrico Letta, in office only since April, faces instability in his coalition, with former prime minister Mario Monti threatening to withdraw support because of the slow pace of desperately needed economic reforms.

    While Spain may have avoided a full bailout so far, its banks - which received 40 billion euros from the euro zone rescue fund in 2012 - face a long road to rehabilitation, as do those in Ireland. The IMF praised both countries for their efforts last month, but also warned of risks ahead.

    "There are so many negatives outside of Greece as well. On the rest of them, we just want them postponed until after the summer," said one senior euro zone source.

    In Ireland, which has performed best of the rescued countries and is expected to emerge from its assistance program later this year, the problems are more of reputation than implementation.

    Transcripts of telephone conversations from 2008 have revealed how bankers at Anglo Irish Bank made light of the Irish government's decision to guarantee their liabilities, a move that ultimately saddled the nation with vast debts.

    The bankers also ridiculed Germany - the chief underwriter of all the rescue loans in Europe - singing "Deutschland ueber alles" on the tapes, which has infuriated German officials, the very people the Irish government needs to keep happy.

    German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble described the bankers as contemptuous.

    While Ireland's problems are likely to blow over, those in Portugal, Greece and Cyprus, which also has tough bailout conditions to meet, are clear and present, and those in Italy and Spain show few signs of disappearing.

    EU institutions effectively shut down in August. but that might not prevent a restless summer as the slumbering crisis reawakens agitated.
    The crisis will reignite very soon. Once Chinese banks start failing because of lack of liquidity and the US is unable to print it's way out of the new global recession. The Euro and eventually the EU will dissolve.

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