1. #881
    I just got Quiescent Runestone from my highmaul 655 loot box, pretty damn happy.

    Which one of my trinkets should i switch it out for? I got Crystalline Blood Drop and Crushto's Runic Alarm. Leaning heavily towards the latter but would like confirmation.
    Last edited by Vasciras; 2014-11-30 at 04:57 PM.

  2. #882
    Not specifically MW related, but keep in mind that Highmaul only has 7 bosses in general when you're looking to buy BoEs. Whether the loot is bad or not is one thing, but if there's like one potential piece you can use in a slot in the entire raid, you have to think about how many weeks it would take to get that exact slot from that exact boss for yourself. There are very few of the 665s that you'd replace within the first two weeks when gear matters the most unless you get incredibly lucky.

  3. #883
    Hello there so I had a few questions about healing as a MW in CM's.

    1) Do you run Chi Explosion or Pool of Mists?

    2) Do you try to coat the group with enveloping mists with the recent 50% buff?

    3) Do you ever uplift in CM's? or just go for an EM or Chi X? The healing from Uplift seems pretty minor

    4) Is Xuen healing good when only dpsing a single target?

    5) RJW or Xuen?

    Would really appreciate some input

  4. #884
    Mechagnome CloudedInSanity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuchikoo View Post
    Hello there so I had a few questions about healing as a MW in CM's.

    1) Do you run Chi Explosion or Pool of Mists?

    2) Do you try to coat the group with enveloping mists with the recent 50% buff?

    3) Do you ever uplift in CM's? or just go for an EM or Chi X? The healing from Uplift seems pretty minor

    4) Is Xuen healing good when only dpsing a single target?

    5) RJW or Xuen?

    Would really appreciate some input
    1. Pool of Mists. Chi Explosion @ 4 Chi heals for less then EM.

    2. Depends on the situation, but ATM EM > Uplift for throughput in 5 man groups. However there are times where your group is missing ~50k health, in this scenario EM is wasted because it will result in overhealing, thus it is best to use Uplift.

    3. See questions #1 and #2.

    4. Xuen is terrible atm.

    5. RJW.
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  5. #885
    Hey guys, can anyone help me with 2 questions regarding mistweavers?

    1. Runic Alarm or Blood Drop for trinket slot? Using DMF on the other. 1200 spirit with Blood Drop Equipped

    2. Which weapon enchant should I use, Shadowmoon or Frostwolf?

    Ty for your attention.

  6. #886
    Quote Originally Posted by meepwnzz View Post
    Hey guys, can anyone help me with 2 questions regarding mistweavers?

    1. Runic Alarm or Blood Drop for trinket slot? Using DMF on the other. 1200 spirit with Blood Drop Equipped

    2. Which weapon enchant should I use, Shadowmoon or Frostwolf?

    Ty for your attention.
    enchant is very up in the air atm.

    go with more MS though, can't go wrong with it

  7. #887
    Quote Originally Posted by CloudedInSanity View Post
    1. Pool of Mists. Chi Explosion @ 4 Chi heals for less then EM.

    2. Depends on the situation, but ATM EM > Uplift for throughput in 5 man groups. However there are times where your group is missing ~50k health, in this scenario EM is wasted because it will result in overhealing, thus it is best to use Uplift.

    3. See questions #1 and #2.

    4. Xuen is terrible atm.

    5. RJW.
    1. Correct, but 15% ReM is the real benefit from PoM in 5-mans, so take BotS if you can hit more than one or two people with it for a small cooldown.

    2. EM>Uplift for throughput for that one GCD, but not for Chi efficiency at all, so if you use EM, you have to spend more GCDs generating Chi, which is generally lower HPS than spending chi, so saying never to use Uplift is bad advice. It's still strong for AoE.

    3. Uplift isn't minor. It seems minor because it's an AoE spell in the new healing model where people have enormous max HP pools. It's still strong for AoE.

    4. Xuen isn't terrible; he got a decent buff during beta. He's now decent for single-target. I can notice a difference between when he's up and when he's not, even with one target.

    5. RJW if the fight/instance allows people to remain stacked, but Xuen if you need to be spread or if you OOM easily.
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  8. #888
    Epic! Volibear's Avatar
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    Off-topic, but I just took a look at the Highmaul loot table, and the itemisation on most pieces is horrid
    Quote Originally Posted by Jester Joe View Post
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  9. #889
    so, multistrike enchant or spirit enchant

    lets go nerds - discuss!
    Last edited by Floopa; 2014-12-01 at 01:02 AM.

  10. #890
    Quote Originally Posted by Floopa View Post
    so, multistrike enchant or spirit enchant

    lets go nerds - discuss!
    spirit to be safe, swap to ms if u feel good with mana ez

  11. #891
    Quote Originally Posted by Floopa View Post
    so, multistrike enchant or spirit enchant

    lets go nerds - discuss!
    I think spirit will be if you are going to rjw the shit out of the raid. Multistrike for all other uses.

    I'm still torn.

  12. #892
    i think i'll go with spirit cus it's cheaper and then change to MS if i feel fine with mana

    now... EQUIP THIS DAMN DMF TRINKET OR NOT ;_;

    such decisions

  13. #893
    Warchief Supliftz's Avatar
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    Spirit is safer. Switch to ms or crit with more gear/fights like brackenspore or tectus.

  14. #894
    Quote Originally Posted by Floopa View Post
    i think i'll go with spirit cus it's cheaper and then change to MS if i feel fine with mana

    now... EQUIP THIS DAMN DMF TRINKET OR NOT ;_;

    such decisions
    in 5 mans "le rofl"

    when both wep proc/dmf card proc I can be at like 60% mana and cruise up to 90% in a few seconds.

  15. #895
    Quote Originally Posted by Geodew View Post
    1. Correct, but 15% ReM is the real benefit from PoM in 5-mans, so take BotS if you can hit more than one or two people with it for a small cooldown.

    2. EM>Uplift for throughput for that one GCD, but not for Chi efficiency at all, so if you use EM, you have to spend more GCDs generating Chi, which is generally lower HPS than spending chi, so saying never to use Uplift is bad advice. It's still strong for AoE.

    3. Uplift isn't minor. It seems minor because it's an AoE spell in the new healing model where people have enormous max HP pools. It's still strong for AoE.

    4. Xuen isn't terrible; he got a decent buff during beta. He's now decent for single-target. I can notice a difference between when he's up and when he's not, even with one target.

    5. RJW if the fight/instance allows people to remain stacked, but Xuen if you need to be spread or if you OOM easily.
    Awesome tyvm for the info

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thank you very much for the info

  16. #896
    personally im not too fond of procs that give a chance for a small time.. sounds rng as shit if you ask me. spirit procs are reliable as theyll always give the same amount of mana.

  17. #897
    Quote Originally Posted by Entropy View Post
    in 5 mans "le rofl"

    when both wep proc/dmf card proc I can be at like 60% mana and cruise up to 90% in a few seconds.
    I found this to be very true in Grimrail CM today. Carried some low DPS through it and it wasn't a huge deal. Ended all fights at like 30-50% after drinking tea at the right moments except for the last fight because that one just took too much out of me, but even so, we made it through with 2 pretty low DPS.

  18. #898

    (More) Exact Stat Weights for MW

    - - - LAST UPDATED JUN/29/2015 - - -
    6.2 Estimated weights at BiS gear levels, with a few as-of-yet-unwritten corrections to the 6.1 weights, and accounting for increased demand for burst throughput in later raid instances (fine-tuned weights to come later)

    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 1.84
    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 1.75
    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.60
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.59
    Intellect: 1.57
    Spellpower: 1.43
    Multistrike (T18 HFC 4pc using PoM): 1.32
    Haste (beyond mana cap*): 1.20
    Multistrike (PoM): 1.10
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 1.06
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 1.01
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.99
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.98
    Versatility (5 healers): 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.90
    Leech: 0.87
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.86
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.86
    Avoidance (5 healers): 0.81
    Avoidance (4 healers): 0.65
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Haste (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.61
    Haste (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.60
    Mastery (100% pickup rate, T18 HFC 4pc using PoM): 0.45
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.37
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.35
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Mastery (typical pickup rate, T18 HFC 4pc using PoM): 0.25
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.21
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.20
    Speed: 0.04


    Old stat weights (Patch 6.1)
    Bottom line at the top:

    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 2.45
    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 2.33
    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 1.41
    Haste (beyond mana cap*): 1.37
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.98
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.97
    Versatility (5 healers): 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.90
    Leech: 0.87
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.85
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.85
    Avoidance (5 healers): 0.81
    Avoidance (4 healers): 0.65
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Haste (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.61
    Haste (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.60
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.49
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.47
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.28
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.27
    Speed: 0.04


    * Mana cap definition: In this context, being exactly at the mana cap implies that one could freely spam the most expensive, effective spells for the current given situation for the entire fight without ever running out of mana until the end of the fight (i.e. end the fight with about 0 mana left including 0 Mana Tea stacks).

    ** “RJW” means you’re using RJW as your T90 talent. “SCK” means you’re using Xuen or Chi Torpedo.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    SIMPLE VERSION for those less familiar with the spec and theorycraft:

    Static* Spirit (to mana cap breakpoint**): 2.45
    Intellect: 1.89
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit procs (to mana cap breakpoint**): 1.41
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap breakpoint**): 0.98
    Versatility: 0.92
    Leech: 0.87
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap breakpoint**): 0.85
    Avoidance (5 healers): 0.81
    Avoidance (4 healers): 0.65
    Haste: 0.61
    Static* Spirit (beyond breakpoint**): 0.48
    Mastery: 0.34
    Spirit procs (beyond breakpoint**): 0.28
    Speed: 0.04


    BRF 2pc/4pc at bottom of post

    *Static Spirit means Unbuffed Spirit: anything that’s not a proc or raw mana.
    ** Mana cap is around 1700 Spirit in BRF, but varies a lot by fight. e.g. very low for Flamebender (~1100 assuming Crane outside Firestorms & Wolves) but very high for Blast Furnace (~2000).

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Note/Disclaimer: As many of you will already know, healer simulations are usually way too low-fidelity to provide accurate stat weights. Thus, healers traditionally resort to methods like these to generate stat weights for BiS, reforging, gemming, etc. Like all healer stat weights, we will make some estimations based on informed opinion. This can’t really be helped. As a result, there can be a tiny bit of confirmation bias in the theory. However, that is not to say these stat weights are wrong or useless. It is my hope and belief that confirmation bias shouldn’t affect the result significantly.

    Crit
    I like to use Crit as a baseline because the math is very easy to do. 1% crit is 1% more healing, right?! Wrong. It’s still easy, though. Crit, like almost all stats, has a natural, implicit Diminishing Returns. Going from 50% crit to 100% crit is not a 50% healing increase because you were already doing +50% healing, and now you’re doing +100%. 2.0/1.5=1.33, not 1.5.

    Thus, we use a BiS list generated from the estimated weights to estimate our crit %. This is the first estimation we are making. Obviously, almost no one will actually be wearing the full BiS set. However, if you’re aiming for it, the distribution of secondary stats will be approximately close. You can always use the math here as a guide for generating the stat weights for your own character’s gear! This is nothing new to generating stat weights and happens for DPS specs, too. That’s why DPS theorycrafters will often recommend simming your character in SimulationCraft for DPS, especially if some stat weights are very close to each other. Unfortunately, we don’t have that luxury, so you’ll have to do it by hand, like I do here. If you’re up for the work, go for it!

    With my approximate weights from earlier put in, I’ve generated a BiS list from Ask Mr. Robot. Since it has 18.77% Crit, that will depreciate Crit’s value by approximately that percentage. We can use Calculus, specifically limits/derivatives, to find out by how much without needing to select a stat delta. However, that’s much more complicated than we actually need, and gives almost the same answer. A small delta will suffice instead. Roughly speaking, we approximate the actual model with linearity, and get that the value of crit is reduced to 1/1.1877 = 0.84196 times its original value.

    Since we’re using Crit as a baseline and stat weights are all just relative, let’s put Crit at a base of 1.00 points. Note that this stat weight is not a translation to HPS at all, nor is one necessary for our goals. If anything, it is approximately “110 points of Crit yields about +1% healing,” where 110 is Crit’s rating-to-percentage conversion rate: +110 Crit Rating = +1% Crit Chance. Note that this does not yet account for the Diminishing Returns, but I’m pointing out that a score of X means that 110 of that stat increases your healing by +X%.

    We don’t yet have a large amount of raid data, so unfortunately, it’s currently difficult to tell how much Crit’s Mana Tea bonus stacks help out on the HPS front because we don’t have a consistent idea of how many Mana Tea stacks people are generating per fight and how much mana that contributes compared to starting mana, base regen, and regen from Spirit. However, there is no denying that, even though drinking Tea requires additional GCDs, having the extra Mana Tea stacks is beneficial. In 5.4, Crit generated enough Mana Tea that it gained value equal to 1/5 of Spirit’s value. So, even if Spirit were even with Crit without taking into account Mana Tea, it would gain 0.2 points! However, since Spirit is now significantly more powerful compared to Mana Tea, as well as the fact that we generate much less Mana Tea due to several different changes (e.g. Chi Brew, longer GCD, less Chi generated per fight), we instead estimate this as a modest 0.05 points.

    (Edit: We now have a good idea of the amount of Mana Tea generation. See the section on crit added below. For now, we’ll include the +0.05 from the stricken-out section, and revisit the weight later.)

    Multiplying by our scalar from earlier, we get the stat weight for Crit to be 0.84196*(1+0.05) = 0.88.


    Intellect and Spellpower
    So hey, Blizzard made this one pretty easy too. Base healing has been removed from all spells, which means that now 1% more spellpower = 1% more healing. So simple! (By the way, 1 Intellect gives 1 Spellpower and nothing else. In MoP, it gave spell crit chance as well, but this has been removed in WoD to make balancing specs with different primary stats easier.)

    The BiS list has 7433 spellpower. Thus, 74.33 spellpower would provide 1% more healing. Contrasting to Crit, we get the stat weight pretty easily: 110/74.33 = 1.48. However, raid buffs for Stats and Spellpower affect this multiplicatively, as does Leather Armor Mastery (now found under the “Armor Skills” passive on the General tab in the spellbook). They also all affect each other multiplicatively. That’s a +21.275% bonus, for a stat weight of 1.79.

    Raw Spellpower, typically found only on weapons, is not affected by the 5% Stats buff or Leather Armor Mastery, since those affect only Intellect. Therefore, Spellpower has only a +10% bonus, for a stat weight of 1.63.

    Reliability is also quite important for healer stats. However, Mistweaver has a very large number of healing events per second in raids. In 5.2 and 5.4, it was typical to see up to 6 healing events per second due to ReM, TFT refreshing ReM, SCK/RJW, SooM, EM, and lots of Uplifts. I think this has almost surely gone down in WoD, but the fact remains that we have so many healing events that the RNG nature of Crit and Multistrike don’t really bother us, especially because the new healing model makes burst windows on the order of just a few seconds much, much less important. However, it is at least certain that a 15% healing gain is strictly better than an RNG healing gain that averages to 15%. Therefore, I suggest that we add at least +3% value to Intellect and Spellpower. We’ll choose +3% for now. I’m sure people can debate this in the following posts. That puts the stat weights at 1.85 and 1.68, instead.

    So far:

    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Crit: 0.88


    Legendary* Rings:
    * Okay, it’s actually Epic-quality, but you know what I mean.

    The Legendary ring proc is a percentage Intellect buff (the ilvl 690 version is +10% Int for 10 seconds with 0.92 RPPM). Since it’s a percentage, its gain is higher with more Intellect, so it increase Int’s stat weight. RPPM gives an actual amount of average procs per minute increased by Haste and Bad Luck Protection. Bad Luck Protection increases the average proc rate by 9%, and the BiS list has 8.14% Haste, so that’s 1.0844 PPM, for an average uptime of 18.07% and an average gain of +1.807% Int.

    Since this is a short-duration proc, that gives it MUCH more randomness than our baseline, which is the randomness of Crit. Blizzard actually decreases the itemization of on-use trinket effects compared to procs by 30% because on-use effects are so much stronger for basically all specs. For some reason, though, the procs are equivalent on average to raw stats on trinkets. Thus, if I had to say, we should give on-use effects 42.86% more value (to counter the -30%: 1.4286/0.7=1) because both static stats and on-use effects are useful to healers, and I’m not comfortable making a decision that one is better than the other, but also dock proc effects (which are much worse than static stats for healers) by 15-30%, depending on its uptime. Thus, using trinkets as a reference point, I recommend we dock the proc effect by 25%, since it’s basically as short as procs go, but has a decent proc rate for a decent uptime. Therefore, we pretend the +1.807% Int is actually +1.3553% Int. Note that this does not affect Spellpower gains, so the Spellpower weight remains the same.

    (1.013553)*(1.03)*(1.10*1.05*1.05)*(110/74.33) = 1.87
    Edit: 715 ring: (1.02)*(1.020333)*(1.10*1.05*1.05)*(110/74.33) = 1.89

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Crit: 0.88



    Multistrike
    Yeah, we’re doing all the easiest ones first, as you might be able to tell. So, here’s the thing: Multistrike is tuned such that it’s just as powerful as crit, assuming you have the same amount of both and no class-specific things affect that. You should immediately note that both of those assumptions are totally false for Mistweaver, as well as most other specs. However, that lets us use 110 Multistrike = +1% healing before DR and class abilities. This checks out: Multistrike is 66 rating per 1%, and gives two chances at doing 30% damage: (110/66 * (2*0.3)) = 1.00.

    MS has DR just like Crit. This time, we have 33.02% Multistrike, which gives 19.812% additional healing, so we need to scale it by 1.0/1.19812 = 0.83464.

    However, Jade Mist procs are ridiculously important for keeping the overhealing of Uplift down, which is a large part of our total and burst healing, and making us a more reliable AoE healer. Popular opinion (as in, completely uncontested so far) suggests that this is immensely more important than bonus mana from Crit’s Mana Tea. Thus, we estimate this as adding 15-30% to the value of Multistrike. At the risk of introducing confirmation bias, I honestly believe Jade Mist is very important for HPS and reliability, so let’s take +25% for now. Feel free to debate this in the thread responses.

    Let’s not also forget the 5% Multistrike affinity from Jade Mists.

    Thus, multistrike’s weight is 0.83464*1.05*(1+0.25) = 1.09.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.88



    Versatility
    Versatility has a conversion rate of 130 rating = +1% damage, +1% healing, and -0.5% damage taken. It is important to note that Eminence, as well as all other Damage->Healing or Healing->Damage mechanics, do NOT double-dip on Versatility, meaning that +130 Versatility will make Tiger Palm do 1% more damage which translates into 1% more healing, NOT 2% more healing.

    The damage/healing part is easy: Crit, Haste, and Multistrike all increase damage dealt directly, as well. However, the damage reduction can be a bit tricky. I have a decent estimation for its value, though. Imagine if the entire raid took 1% less damage. That’s roughly the equivalent of all healers doing about 1% more healing. However, it’s not direct: 50% less damage is like +100% healing, and taking 0% damage is like your healers doing infinite HPS. However, you are but one cog in an assumed 20-man raid. In addition to that, Tanks usually take significantly more damage than everyone else. If we assume both tanks take approximately twice as much damage as everyone else, then that’s like two extra people to heal. Yes, this is very rough, since you have to use single-target to heal them, not AoE, but it should be a plenty good enough estimation for our purposes. So anyway, reducing your damage taken by 0.5% is like reducing the entire raid’s damage taken by 0.5/22 = 0.022727%. That means it’s equivalent to everyone taking 99.977% of normal damage, which is equivalent to +0.022732% raid healing. Again, you’ll want to adjust this for different raid sizes if you’re being precise, but obviously I’m using the Mythic raid size as a baseline.

    However, since damage reduction affects all healers, that means that the value of the damage reduction depends on the number of healers. This makes sense because the number of healers used for an encounter depends on how much damage is going out. The more healers you have who are healing their tits off trying to keep you alive, the more “healing” your damage reduction is doing. This is similar to the effect of Power Word: Barrier or Devotion Aura being strong or weak depending on how much damage the raid takes during that time period. Anyway, since Versatility effectively boosts all healers, its value depends on how many healers there are. I’ll do the math for 3-6 healers.

    Equivalent to:
    3 Healers: +0.068197% healing done by the monk
    4 Healers: +0.090929% healing done by the monk
    5 Healers: +0.113662% healing done by the monk
    6 Healers: +0.136394% healing done by the monk

    This is pretty significant, considering that the +healing is +1.0% by itself, so the damage reduction can add over 10% to its value depending on healer count. The fact that we underestimated the value of this damage reduction until now (effectively calling it zero value) means that we’re about to see a much higher weight for Versatility than we first expected.

    As with Crit and Multistrike, though, Versatility has Diminishing Returns. The BiS list doesn’t have much Versatility, though; even with the 3% buff it’s only at 3.98% Versatility. That gives us a scalar of 0.96172. Combined with the above, since this is almost 1.0, this is going to increase Versatility’s weight by a significant amount relative to Crit, which we already have a lot of. Versatility also requires 130 rating for 1% instead of 110 rating like Crit. That applies another scalar of 110/130 = 0.84615. Multiplying the two scalars together gives 0.81376.

    We will again add +3% value to the +healing component of Versatility due to reliability, and apply a 15% unreliability penalty to the damage reduction part because raid mechanics target random players.

    Finally, the weights (20-Mythic):
    3 Healers: 0.81376*(1.03 + 0.85*0.068197) = 0.885
    4 Healers: 0.81376*(1.03 + 0.85*0.090929) = 0.901
    5 Healers: 0.81376*(1.03 + 0.85*0.113662) = 0.917
    6 Healers: 0.81376*(1.03 + 0.85*0.136394) = 0.933

    It may be alarming that Versatility has a higher weight than Crit, but actually, it’s because of the diminishing returns on Crit and the fact that we have so much more of it. For example, if we had as much Crit Rating as we had Versatility Rating, its value goes down by 8%, which puts the weight at 0.839 for 4 healers, which is lower than Crit. This indicates that we should try to balance Crit and Versatility, favoring slightly more Crit than Versatility. I will now adjust the stat weights to assume that’s the case. Note that to be ultimately precise, since the stat weights have changed drastically, I should find a new BiS list. However, since AMR doesn’t do dynamically changing stat weights, I couldn’t get it to change, even setting Versatility’s weight slightly above Crit’s. Instead, I have noted that the BiS list has about 1300 crit rating and 100 Versatility rating. I have recalculated both weights using 700 rating for each for purposes of their diminishing returns. This placed Crit above Versatility, as we originally expected. Therefore, we reach the conclusion that we’ll want to watch Crit and Vers and balance them, with Crit slightly above Versatility. In other words, you’ll want plenty of Crit, but Versatility is stronger if you have extremely little of it!

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87



    Mastery
    Ugh, Mastery. Uncontrolled and random. Think about this for a second: Would you rather have +10% healing from Crit, or +10% healing from Gift of the Serpent? Clearly, you choose the Crit because it’s less RNG and dependent on players picking them up and such, right? Well, I agree, but only to an extent; having the orbs lying around can technically help your raid get through a tight situation if they’re not too busy tunneling. You can take healing from the past and have it now instead, which helps with burst. Thus, I think GotS should receive a small penalty for uncontrollability, but perhaps no more than 5%. Let’s say 3%. Again, feel free to debate all such estimations in the thread.

    As for the scaling, every spec’s Mastery scales differently. Mistweaver’s has a base 10% (up from 8% in MoP) and is increased at a rate of 88 rating = 1% Mastery.

    I’ll now cite Total’s spreadsheet at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...0r8/edit#gid=0, which I have peer-reviewed and believe to be correct. From this, we see that 1% Mastery gives about 0.6% additional healing at 100% pickup rate (depending on healing composition), so that’s a base weight of 0.6. In SoO 6.0 pre-patch, we saw a pickup rate of about 55% for pretty much every fight, so we’ll use that as an average pickup rate for now until we have current-tier data.

    One could make an argument that we should subtract an arbitrary 5-10% from Mastery due to its extreme RNG and uncontrollability during burst. However, I counter that DPS/Tank raiders can actually use Mastery healing from back in the past to help the MW’s burst in the present, potentially helping even more than Crit could, so I think that cancels out the penalty.

    Mastery suffers heavily from diminishing returns. We have a full 10% base chance to start with, unlike the other stats, and the Mastery raid buff gives us another 550/88 = 6.25%. Despite it being our worst stat in the estimations, the BiS list has a sizable 19.73% Mastery. Thus, the DR scalar is 1/1.1973 = 0.83521.

    Therefore, Mastery’s weight is 0.83521*0.55*0.6*(110/88) = 0.34.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34


    More on Mastery:
    The developers seem to believe that our pickup rate is much more like 95%, according to my understanding of Celestalon’s blue post on the official forums (the one where he responded to my enormous list of MW’s problems during beta). Interestingly, even if we assume this is true, Mastery is still far away from our better stats like Crit or MS. Remove the 0.55 pickup rate multiplier from the stat weight calculation, and we get Mastery’s weight to be: 0.83521*0.6*(110/88) = 0.63. That’s only about 2/3 the value of Crit. That just goes to show just how undertuned Mastery is; it’s bad even with 100% pickup rate, which we’re not even getting close to in practical settings.

    As another side note, let us assume that the developers are using Detonate Chi every 10-15 seconds to reach these kinds of numbers with Mastery. If you’re using Detonate Chi every 15 seconds or so, since you’re spending GCDs and mana on something else every 10 GCDs, compared to not using it at all, that’s approximately a 10% HPS loss. Therefore, the healing from Detonate Chi would need to make up for that HPS loss to be worth casting. Since, at 100% pickup rate, our BiS list’s ~20% mastery only increases healing by about 0.6*20% = 12%, and supposing that using Detonate Chi increases your Mastery pickup rate from 55% to (being generous here to prove a point) 100%, using Detonate Chi will increase your healing by (1+0.12)/(1+0.55*0.12) = 5.07%, which is significantly less than the 10% HPS we lost from casting Detonate every 15 seconds. Therefore, we can probably safely say that using Detonate Chi regularly is very likely to result in a performance loss with Mastery’s current tuning.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34


    Spirit
    So far, I’ve been going in ascending order of difficulty to calculate, but we need to do Spirit before Haste.

    Spirit gives much more mana per point in Warlords relative to MoP numbers. We can find the numbers here, thanks to Hamlet from <Elitist Jerks>, who has been doing reliable theorycraft for all healers (especially Resto Druid) for quite a while: http://iam.yellingontheinternet.com/...nt-and-future/ - we get 2.061 mana per 5 seconds (mp5) per point of Spirit, with a base mp5 of 3200. Therefore, 110 Spirit increases your mp5 by 226.71.

    Let us assume, at first, that we have enough GCDs to make use of the additional mana. That is, we assume we are not yet at the soft mana cap. In this context, being exactly at the mana cap implies that one could freely spam the most expensive, effective spells for the current given situation for the entire fight without ever running out of mana until the end of the fight (i.e. end the fight with about 0 mana left including 0 Mana Tea stacks).

    Since one could heal a 5-man spamming lots of Surging Mists with very little Spirit and not OOM, let us approximate that we are using the mana to replace casts of Surging Mist with casts of Spinning Crane Kick or Rushing Jade Wind. (Edit: This seems to also hold true from extensive raid testing. It is nearly impossible to OOM without casting RJW/SCK.) This gets a bit complicated. We approximate that, in a raid setting, 80% of Surging Mist heals are part of a SooM->SM combo, and that the other 20% are part of a SooM->SM->SM combo. This approximation is based on my personal experiences from pre-patch 6.0 Siege of Orgrimmar. (Edit: Seems about right in Highmaul, maybe a higher amount of SooM->SM->SM if anything.) As usual, feel free to debate this approximation in the responses to this post.

    With Rushing Jade Wind
    With RJW, we substitute one GCD of Surging with one GCD of RJW. However, Surging is essentially always cast during SooM, which takes an additional 0.5 seconds to start (regardless of Haste). This 0.5 seconds is never spent if we don’t cast the Surging Mist, which is another part of what makes this a bit complicated.

    Bear with me for a few minutes, here; we have a lot of intermediate calculations to do. Soothing Mist heals for 918% of spellpower over its duration with the perk, but with the statue’s healing (which doesn’t receive the perk), it heals for 1683% of spellpower healing over its duration. Its duration is 8 seconds, affected by Haste, which is (1+Haste%)*210.375% spellpower per second. SooM’s mastery scalar is 0.67 with statue’s 0.33, for a total of 1.00. Since we’re taking averages, we can equate this to a single proc with scalar 1.0. Gift of the Serpent heals for 75% spellpower, and our Mastery in BiS is 19.73%, so that adds an average of (1+Haste%)*14.798% spellpower per second, for a total of (1+Haste%)*225.173% spellpower per second.

    Surging Mist’s tooltip on Wowhead is broken, but it heals for 302% of spellpower on live (without the SotWS buff). Its Mastery scalar is 1.0, so that again adds 14.798% spellpower, for a total of 316.798% spellpower.

    We can probably assume the MW stops channeling Soothing Mist after the GCD of Surging Mist ends, which means the SooM->SM combo has a duration of 0.5s + 1.5s, where the latter is affected by Haste, or 0.5s + 1.5s/(1+Haste%). From this, we calculate the HPS of the SooM->SM combo: (316.798 + (1+Haste%)*225.173*(0.5s + 1.5s/(1+Haste%))) / (0.5s + 1.5s/(1+Haste%)) percentage spellpower. Haste% does not cancel out of this formula, so we’ll plug in the Haste% of the BiS list, which is 8.14% raid buffed, to get 411.378% spellpower per second. With similar math, we get 437.015% per second for the SooM->SM->SM combo. This is where my combo predictions come in. Not that it matters much, since the numbers are so close, but with a weighted average, we approximate that “SM+SooM” heals for 416.505% spellpower per second. Normalizing this to the cast time replaced by RJW gives (multiplying by 1.5/(1+Haste%)) 577.730% spellpower.

    RJW heals for 39.5% spellpower per tick, ticks 9 times, heals six people, and has a 0.1 Mastery scalar. The raw healing done is 39.5*9*6 = 2133% spellpower. There are a total of 9*6 = 54 heals, each with a 0.1 Mastery scalar. Thus, the average GotS healing is an additional 79.906% spellpower, for a total of 2212.906% spellpower.

    The mana cost of SooM->SM or SooM->SM->SM depends on Haste. Soothing Mist ticks every 1/(1+Haste%) seconds, and we channel for 0.5 + 1.5/(1+Haste%) seconds for SooM->SM, for a total of (0.5 + 1.5/(1+Haste%)) / (1/(1+Haste%)) ticks = 0.5*(1+Haste%) + 1.5 ticks = 2.0407 ticks, and 3.5407 ticks for SooM->SM->SM. With a mana cost of 1120 per tick, and a SM mana cost of 7520, SooM->SM spends (2.0407*1120 + 7520) / (0.5 + 1.5/(1+Haste%)) = 5196 mana per second, and SooM->SM->SM spends (similar math) 5805 mana per second. This gives a weighted average of “SooM+SM” spending 5317 mana per second. Normalizing this to the cast time of RJW gives 7375 mana.

    Rushing Jade Wind costs 20,000 mana. The mana difference is 12,624 mana, which takes 110 Spirit 12624/(226.71/5) = 278.44 seconds to generate.

    The spellpower difference is 1635.176% spellpower every 278.44 seconds, or +5.873% spellpower per second. Using a variant of Total’s Gift of the Serpent spreadsheet, I estimate that we put out about 415.71% spellpower healing per second outside of Revivals (Note: It looks like RJW, Chi Burst, and Uplift inflate this quite a bit, especially RJW, but this is also per second, not per GCD. For reference, a 6-person Uplift is 990% spellpower in one GCD excluding Mastery.). Therefore, 110 Spirit yields about a 1.41% HPS gain, which puts its stat weight at 1.41.

    That was a lot of math, but I’ll assume this is correct for now, since it’s well within the ballpark of about 0.1 to 10.0 that I was expecting. Hopefully one or more of you could double-check me.

    Note that we can safely ignore the effects of Crit, MS, and Vers since we’re measuring relative power, and those three stats affect both SM and RJW equally. Note also that I didn’t account for Mastery pickup rate here, but there may be a variation between how many RJW orbs vs. SM orbs are picked up, anyway, and it barely nudges the spellpower values, as well.

    Finally, note that we used a fluid Haste model instead of trying to figure out exactly how many SooM ticks we were getting, whereas I’m pretty sure SooM does not actually have partial ticks (it would be nice if it did, since it already ticks so fast that there’s not really much tick-clipping gameplay. Alas…), but I think (hope) that should also be a minor effect since we included the fake partial ticks in both HPS and mana. It may be worth re-doing if that turns out to not be the case, but I’ve already been working on Spirit for quite a while and raids are coming out very soon.

    Edit: Note that this reflects Spirit weights for 6.0. The weights are adjusted for a change in 6.1 below in an update. This section was preserved to make the post as a whole more readable.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit (to mana cap, with RJW): 1.41
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34


    With Spinning Crane Kick
    Spinning Crane Kick costs 14,080 mana and heals 49.375% spellpower per tick. It ticks 4 times over 2.25 seconds (faster with Haste). That’s a total raw healing of 1185% spellpower. It has a 0.15 Mastery scalar and 6*4=24 total ticks, which makes its average Mastery healing in the BiS set 53.271% spellpower, for a total of 1238.271% spellpower.

    Normalizing “SooM+SM” mana cost to the cast time of SCK instead of RJW yields a mana cost of 11063. The mana difference is now only 14080 – 11063 = 3017. To step back for some intuition: this is significantly less than the RJW case because SCK both costs less mana than RJW and also eats more time (in which we would otherwise be spending more mana), so using more SCK casts is less taxing on mana than using more RJW casts. This is something we have always known since they created this iteration of RJW in Patch 5.4, and here it is represented in numbers.

    Normalizing “SooM+SM” spellpower healing to the cast time of SCK yields 866.595% spellpower.

    Therefore, SCK is a gain of 1238.271 – 866.595 = 371.676% spellpower every 3017/226.71*5 = 66.539 seconds. This is 5.586% spellpower per second, and using the same logic from RJW, equates to about 1.34% additional healing, which is a stat weight of 1.34.

    As expected, Spirit is more useful if you’re using RJW, since RJW is more costly and more mana efficient. However, it’s a bit less of a difference than I expected.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit (to mana cap, with RJW): 1.41
    Spirit (to mana cap, with SCK): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34


    Spirit beyond mana cap
    I’ve always believed that setting Spirit’s weight to 0 beyond the mana cap is unrealistic. There is always a chance that the raid will take slightly more or less damage than usual, which means the amount of Spirit you’ll need is fluid. It is not a sharp cut-off.

    Suppose that you’ve found a mana cap where you can keep healing to meet the raid’s needs, and that you’re at or just beyond that level of regen. There is a small chance on progression that your raid will take more damage than usual, but still not so much as to immediately wipe, which means your additional mana is helpful to maintain high throughput. We could estimate this chance at 20% to get Spirit weights for beyond the mana cap. That is, it has a 20% chance to be completely effective and an 80% chance to be worth nothing. This would give us weights of 0.28 for RJW and 0.27 for SCK. These are rough estimates because that 20% chance is a rough estimate. However, a rough estimate is really all we need for this to decide between two pieces of gear that are really close in value where one has Spirit and the other doesn’t and we have plenty of mana already. At that point, Spirit is essentially just a tie-breaker.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit (to mana cap, with RJW): 1.41
    Spirit (to mana cap, with SCK): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with RJW): 0.28
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with SCK): 0.27


    Haste
    Haste is interesting because its value depends entirely on whether or not we have the mana to back it up; you cast faster, which means you spend mana faster. I think I will just calculate two weights for the two situations: (a) MW cannot spend all of his/her mana, so Haste allows more GCDs filled with expensive spells, AKA “GCD limited,” and (b) MW can OOM easily if he/she uses expensive spells whenever it does more HPS, AKA “Mana limited.” Which case applies seemingly depends on how much mana regeneration you have and whether you take RJW, Xuen, or Chi Torpedo. These also correspond to being above the Spirit mana cap for (a) and below the Spirit mana cap for (b).

    Of interest to both cases is that Haste is 90 rating per 1%, compared to Crit’s 110. In previous expansions, the “cost” of Haste was much cheaper, so you could get much more of it for less rating. It was actually about 40% cheaper than Crit in MoP. As we will see, this, among other factors, will make Haste somewhat unattractive in case (a), and quite awful in case (b).

    Case (a):
    Although Haste increases how fast you cast spells, it does not decrease the length of spell cooldowns for Renewing Mist and Expel Harm. Luckily for me, Surging Mist and Renewing Mist have similar healing when you factor in ReM’s tendency to do about 30-50% overheal, so we’ll ignore Renewing Mist’s cooldown as a factor for now, since it also spends a similar amount of mana and generates 1 Chi. Also luckily for me, Expel Harm is a chi generation ability that we use because it’s cheap, not because it’s powerful. Since we’re just talking about HPS for right now, we can therefore ignore both of these factors and just approximate 1% more Haste = 1% more healing; you’re generating and spending Chi approximately 1% faster.

    Haste also grants some raw throughput. If 100% of our healing came from HoTs, we would get roughly double the benefit from Haste. For example, with 100% of healing from HoTs, +50% Haste would not only let you cast 50% more spells, but they would all be 50% stronger. This is because you get additional HoT ticks and partial ticks at no additional cost of mana or time. However, despite the tooltip, SooM’s mana cost is paid per tick, not per second, and the effect of Haste on it does not double-dip, so there is no free healing gain there. The only free healing gains are not to our channeled HoTs, but to our actual HoTs: Renewing Mist and Enveloping Mist. Together, these make up about 17.6% of all healing (about 3% from EM and 14.5% from ReM). This number was derived by averaging a couple parses across all fights, including but putting half-weight on fights that were gimmicky (such as Brackenspore requiring significantly more single-target healing than usual in raids, seeing over 20% EM healing for many parses as well as quite low ReM healing), and completely excluding fights that were being overhealed (as those tend to see an unusually low ReM composition). This means 1% Haste gives about +0.176% healing done from increasing healing of HoTs. This is in addition to the benefits above related to the additional GCDs.

    However, we haven’t taken into account Mana Tea. The channeling of Mana Tea is not sped up by Haste. Let us estimate how many Mana Tea stacks we will consume per minute in the coming tier. It looks to be about 5.8 stacks per minute in pre-patch SoO. At level 100, however, we have less Haste, less mana to back up that Haste, and less Crit, which by my estimations make it more like 5.8*(1/1.25)*(1.15/1.25) = 4.27 stacks per minute. However, I believe that many of my stacks were going unused because I had so much mana in the pre-patch, so we may want to use the number of stacks I *generated* instead, since it seems we will likely be using most of them. That bumps it up to 8.23 stacks per minute in the pre-patch, or approximately 6.06 stacks per minute at Level 100. (Edit: This is looking to match WoD data for an average; I’m seeing 5.5-6.5 stacks consumed per minute across various fights.) That’s 3.03 seconds of channeling per minute, which is about 5% of the total fight time. If we assume that about 50% of our channeling goes on when there is nothing to heal, and thus we lose no HPS from channeling Mana Tea, that means Haste is 2.52% less effective due to not affecting Mana Tea channel speed.

    Haste is also somewhat more consistent and predictable than an HPS gain from RNG stats like Crit and Multistrike. However, I’d argue that it’s less consistent than Int or Versatility. If you need to get a certain amount of healing to the raid or a particular target within a certain amount of time, Int and Vers will always increase that amount of healing. Crit, MS, and Mastery have a chance to increase that amount of healing. Haste either does or doesn’t at all depending on how large of a Haste difference there is and the time frame in question. For example, if you have 1.5 seconds to save a target from dying, you would need a certain amount of Haste in order to fit in a second SM in a SooM->SM->SM combo (specifically, 50% Haste). Any less than that amount of Haste does nothing. Any more than that amount of Haste also does nothing. It is for this reason that I dislike the argument that Haste is reliable because, in fact, it depends completely on the situation, which is effectively random itself. In other words, it is my belief that Haste is not inherently random, but is effectively random because it has a deterministic (i.e. non-random) benefit based on whatever (random) situation we’re in. We gave Versatility an arbitrary 3% bonus for reliability. I think Haste should get 1% at most, as it should be relatively much less, if we even give it a bonus at all.

    Haste may look fine so far, but it increases our mana consumption rate, which means we need more Spirit to maintain it. Even though we’re discussing case (a), it seems unfair to the other stats to not include this effect. After all, X% extra healing with increased mana consumption is strictly worse than simply X% extra healing.

    On that note, NOW the effects of Expel Harm saving mana comes in. EH has a cooldown of 15 seconds, but it is used about every 18-20 seconds by good players (because it is not highest in the priority list, nor is it used at full Chi, nor is it used if the player expects to reach full Chi before people need healing). Although I know the mana cost of EH (4800), I do not know our average mana consumption rate. I believe this could be calculated in a similar way to how I calculated our average HPS in terms of spellpower. However, frankly, if I do that, I probably won’t finish this before Highmaul comes out, like I promised. :P

    Therefore, we’ll do an estimation. With BiS Haste levels, we get about 43 GCDs per minute. Supposing that EH consumes about 3 of those, and noting that its mana cost is about 37% less than SM, we can roughly estimate that we spend mana equal to 42 GCDs per minute due to the mana we save from EH (3*0.37, very rough). Therefore, 1% Haste increases mana expenditure of something close to (43/42)*1% = 1.024% additional mana. This is such a small effect from EH that the estimation is probably completely acceptable.

    Using Hamlet’s blog page at http://iam.yellingontheinternet.com/...nt-and-future/ as a source again, it looks like we have maybe about 650k mana for a 6-minute fight in total. 650k mana is not very accurate for Mistweaver due to Mana Tea, but as we will see, this is such a small penalty to Haste that the rough estimation should suffice, and Mana Tea is actually a mana refund mechanic, not a mana regeneration mechanic, so I doubt it matters at all. Anyway, 1.024% of that is 6656 mana. However, this is case (a), so we do not actually spend all of our mana. Supposing you end the fight with about 5 Mana Tea stacks and 25% of your mana left (an estimate from my own personal experience, updated for WoD, feel free to debate, etc.), that’s about 11% of your total mana that you didn’t use, or 72k mana, so subtracting that from 650k yields 578k, and 1.024% of that is 5919 mana. Therefore, we spend roughly an additional 5919 mana from casting spells 1% faster over a 6-minute fight.

    Since this is case (a), we have plenty of Mana Tea to drink. Each stack of Mana Tea recovers 4% of our max mana, or 5160 mana in BRF BiS. Therefore, we lose 0.5*0.5*5919/5160 = 0.2868 seconds over the 6-minute fight to drinking more Mana Tea, taking into account the estimation that 50% of Mana Tea is consumed when the raid is topped off, which is only a 0.0797% throughput loss.

    We also note Haste’s DR: Again, we have 8.14% Haste, which gives us a DR coefficient of 0.92473.

    Finally, Haste’s value is increased by 5% because the raid buff stacks multiplicatively with your existing Haste.

    Therefore, in case (a), the stat weight is: 1.05*0.92473*1.01*(110/90)*(1.0+0.176)/(1.0252*1.000797) = 1.37! If this is higher than you expected compared to Crit, note that the Diminishing Returns on it is low compared to Crit because the BiS list is focusing Crit (we expect case (b) in raids, so case (b) was used in the stat weight estimations used to generate the BiS list, not case (a)). Be careful about stacking Haste instead if you find yourself GCD limited. Instead, you will need to recalculate the stat weights once you have more Haste and less Crit. Although Haste should remain well ahead, the weights would change drastically. With this revelation implicit, we’ll list the stat weight as what we calculated for now.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit (to mana cap, with RJW): 1.41
    Haste (beyond mana cap): 1.37
    Spirit (to mana cap, with SCK): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with RJW): 0.28
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with SCK): 0.27


    Case (b):
    1% Haste does NOT give 1% more healing in case (b). Since we’re limited by mana, we have no extra mana to spend with our additional GCDs. However, our GCDs do something, at least: We can use a higher quantity of cheaper spells instead of a lower quantity of expensive spells. For every 1% Haste we increase by (ignoring DR, which we will factor in later), we gain one GCD for every 90 rating. The best way to make use of these extra GCDs would be to use SooM where before you needed to use SooM+SM.

    Surging heals for 302% of spellpower, or 316.798% with Mastery, but also generates one Chi. Assuming (reasonably, IMHO) that this Chi is spent on Uplift, supposing an average of 5 targets and taking Mastery into account, that’s another 427.298% spellpower lost. That’s 744.096% spellpower we need to make up with SooM. However, we gain another half-GCD that we don’t have to spend on casting Uplift, as well, plus 0.5*0.5/4 = 0.0625 seconds from spending less time consuming Mana Tea (including the estimate that 50% of Mana Tea is consumed when the raid is topped off). Earlier, we calculated that SooM heals for (1+Haste%)*225.173% spellpower per second, including Mastery. One GCD is 1.5/(1+Haste%) seconds, so SooM heals for 1.5*225.173% = 337.760% spellpower per GCD.

    Therefore, we need (744.096/337.760) = 2.203 GCDs of SooM to make up the healing. Subtract the half-GCD, since we’re no longer spending it on casting Uplift, and the 0.0625 seconds that we’re no longer spending on channeling Mana Tea, so we only need 1.658 GCDs from Haste itself to make up the healing, which means we need 1.658% Haste to gain this benefit once every 100 GCDs.

    However, what’s the mana difference? 2.203 GCDs of SooM is (2.203*1.5) = 3.3045 ticks of SooM, which costs (3.3045*1120) = 3701 mana. One Surging costs 7520 mana, with an effective cost of 6230 mana due to Mana Tea. (We didn’t need this fact for Spirit weights since SM, SCK, and RJW all generate Chi, and x-y = (x-a)-(y-a).) The half-Uplift obviously costs no actual mana, so that’s a mana difference of 2529. This mana is effectively gained every 100 GCDs given the +1.658% Haste. With the BiS list Haste of 8.14%, 100 GCDs is 138.7 seconds, which is a gain of 91.17 mp5, equivalent to 44.23 Spirit.

    Note that we didn’t actually gain any raw HPS from this, but used the additional time to spend less mana, which we have equated with an amount of Spirit, which increases throughput indirectly. 1.658% Haste requires 149.2 Haste Rating, which yields the equivalent mana of 44.23 Spirit, which has a weight of 1.41 (RJW) or 1.34 (SCK).

    Recall from case (a) that 1% Haste gives about +0.176% healing done from increasing healing of HoTs. This is in addition to the benefits above related to the additional GCDs, which is relatively small in case (b), so it has a much larger effect in case (b)!

    Let us not also forget the +5% value from the raid buff, +1% value from consistency, -8.14% value from DR, and finally, -2.52% value from Haste not affecting Mana Tea channel speed (which does not affect the bonus to HoTs, only additional GCDs gained).

    Then Haste’s stat weight is: 1.05*0.92473*1.01*[((44.23*X)/149.2)/1.0252 + (110/90)*(0.176)] where X is 1.41 for RJW or 1.34 for SCK. This yields 0.61 for RJW and 0.60 for SCK.

    So far:

    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit (to mana cap, with RJW): 1.41
    Haste (beyond mana cap): 1.37
    Spirit (to mana cap, with SCK): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit: 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.87
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Haste (to mana cap, with RJW): 0.61
    Haste (to mana cap, with SCK): 0.60
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with RJW): 0.28
    Spirit (beyond mana cap, with SCK): 0.27


    A more accurate Crit weight (Added Dec 28 2014)
    We now have the data on Mana Tea and the value of GCDs (from calculating Haste), which we lose from channeling additional Mana Tea, and the value of additional mana (from calculating Spirit). With these, we can calculate a more accurate crit weight from the fact that it causes additional Mana Tea generation.

    In the section for crit, we estimated that the mana gain added 5% value to crit, which put its stat weight at 0.84196*(1+0.05) = 0.88. With only 700 crit rating, as we elaborated on in the Versatility section, the DR coefficient becomes 0.87442, yielding 0.92.

    We estimated, seemingly correctly, that we generate 6.06 stacks of Mana Tea per minute in Level 100 WoD raids. Note that this estimate included an estimate of current crit chance levels, so we’ll need to take that out: 6.06/1.15 = 5.27 Mana Tea per minute at 0% crit, which now makes it affected by Diminishing Returns. +1% stacks (from 110 crit rating) is +0.0527 Mana Tea stacks per minute, which is 0.0527*5160 = 271.932 mana per minute, which is 22.661 mp5, which is equivalent to 10.995 Spirit (excluding Spirit’s benefits for Mana Tea). Note that this is true no matter what your crit chance is: The percentage gain of Mana Tea stacks has diminishing returns with Crit Chance, but that’s irrelevant; the mana gain (and thus equivalent Spirit) remains the same at all crit levels. Since the value of Crit now depends on the value of Spirit, we’ll have four crit weights for above/below mana cap and talented RJW/SCK.

    However, this mana gain comes with a penalty that we need to spend an additional 0.5s channeling the additional Mana Tea stack, about 50% of which is channeled when the raid is topped off, so effectively 0.25 seconds. This is (1+Haste%)*0.25/1.5 GCDs per Mana Tea stack, which is (1+Haste%)*(0.25/1.5)*0.0527 GCDs per minute. Each minute contains (1+Haste%)*60/1.5 GCDs, so that’s an additional 100*[((0.25/1.5)*0.0527)/40]% = 0.022% GCDs. This is equivalent to losing 0.022 GCDs out of every 100, or (sort of) a loss of 0.022% Haste (except the bonus to HoT healing), which is equivalent to 2.2 Haste Rating. However, since this is a GCD loss, and not an actual Haste loss, we need to calculate the value of a GCD, not the value of Haste. We can do this by recalculating the value of “Haste” as if it (1) didn’t provide a bonus to HoTs, (2) had no Diminishing Returns (since this is a percentage GCD loss independent of current Haste levels), and (3) was not increased by the 5% Haste raid buff. For the GCD limited case (case a), we argued that number (1) was irrelevant, but we will remove it from the mana limited case (case b), at least.

    Previously (Real Haste):
    Case (a): 1.05*0.92473*1.01*(110/100)/(1.0252*1.000642) = 1.05
    Case (b): 1.05*0.92473*1.01*[((38.81*X)/165.8)/1.0252 + (110/100)*(0.176)] where X is 1.41 for RJW or 1.34 for SCK (= 0.51 RJW, 0.49 SCK)

    Becomes (GCD only, no DR):
    Case (a): 1.01*(110/100)/(1.0252*1.000642) = 1.08
    Case (b): 1.01*[((38.81*X)/165.8)/1.0252] where X is 1.41 for RJW or 1.34 for SCK (= 0.33 RJW, 0.31 SCK)

    Thus, we then subtract the value of 2.2 “Haste” Rating using the new “GCD” weights from the value of the original 110 crit. Altogether, this yields the following:

    Base weight (has DR): 1.0
    Bonus from mana (no DR): Equivalent to +10.995 Spirit per 110 Crit, using Spirit proc stat weights (no Mana Tea effect)
    Penalty from GCDs channeling Mana Tea (no DR): Equivalent to -2.2 Haste per 110 Crit, using “GCD” stat weights

    Breaking that down further (using BiS crit level, putting base stat weights in brackets for readability):
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap, with RJW): 0.84196*[1.00] + (13.64*[1.41]/110) - (2.2*[0.33]/110) = 1.01
    Crit (to Spirit cap, with SCK): 0.84196*[1.00] + (13.64*[1.34]/110) - (2.2*[0.31]/110) = 1.00
    Crit (beyond Spirit cap, with RJW): 0.84196*[1.00] + (13.64*[0.28]/110) - (2.2*[1.08]/110) = 0.86
    Crit (beyond Spirit cap, with SCK): 0.84196*[1.00] + (13.64*[0.27]/110) - (2.2*[1.08]/110) = 0.85

    This actually indicates that Crit is slightly better than we thought because the mana gain is a bit more in quantity and value than we expected previously. This moves Crit above Versatility, even with low quantities of Versatility, indicating that we can drop the “about 700 rating” balancing shenanigans and go back to Versatility’s true weight in the BiS, which had only 128 Versatility rating. If you recall, Versatility’s calculated weight with its original DR was (4 healers) 0.81376*(1.03 + 0.090929) = 0.912.

    - - - Updated - - -

    6.1 Update (Mana Tea change) (Added Feb 21 2015)

    Mana Tea has been changed to yield 300% of unbuffed Spirit instead of 4% of maximum mana, which lowers our mana cap but increases the stat weight of static (that is, non-proc) Spirit. The stat weight of Spirit procs (Shadowmoon weapon enchant, some trinkets) remains unchanged. Also changing are weights that depended on Mana Tea’s value, like Crit.

    Static Spirit
    We’ll start with Spirit. We can continue to use our estimate of 6.06 Mana Tea stacks per minute, though further testing has shown that this can go up to an average of about 9 stacks per minute with heavy Crane Stance usage. We’ll use 6.06 primarily since heavy Crane usage usually means you’re hitting mana cap and would want to drop Spirit to that level anyway, but we may as well do the math with both.

    A Spirit gain of 110 would increase Mana Tea mana gained by 330. Multiply by the number of stacks per minute to yield mana per minute. Multiply by 5/60 to get mp5 per point of Spirit: 0.25*X where X is the number of stacks per minute. There are a few correct ways to proceed from here, but we’ll do this: convert the mp5 back into a raw Spirit equivalent, then add that to the original value of 110 Spirit.

    That works out to:
    (RJW): 1.41*(1 + 0.121300 * X)
    (SCK): 1.34*(1 + 0.121300 * X)
    where X is the number of stacks gained per minute.

    Again, we’ll use 6.06 for the stat weight list, but here’s 9.00 if you want the math. I won’t list it on the weights list because it’s already getting pretty long, I don’t think it will be useful to know often, and I haven’t done it for any other stats that depend on Mana Tea generation per minute.

    (6.06 spm with RJW): 2.45
    (6.06 spm with SCK): 2.33
    (9.00 spm with RJW): 2.95
    (9.00 spm with SCK): 2.80

    Haste (above mana cap)
    Recall that the additional throughput from Haste above mana cap still means we need to spend more time drinking tea, even though it’s slight. Let’s see if it changes the weight significantly. We’ll use the BiS unbuffed Spirit of 1720, which means Mana Tea decreases from 6400 mana to 5160. This changes the throughput loss from 0.0642% to 0.0797%.

    Thus the equation
    1.05*0.92473*1.01*(110/90)*(1.0+0.176)/(1.0252*1.000642) = 1.37
    changes to
    1.05*0.92473*1.01*(110/90)*(1.0+0.176)/(1.0252*1.000797) = 1.37
    ...hopefully to no one’s surprise, because that change is miniscule. In other words, the change is so small that when you only do the math out to two decimal places, they’re equal.

    Haste (below mana cap)
    The effective mana cost of chi generators has increased due to less Mana Tea return, which increases Haste’s value below the mana cap because Haste forces more of our throughput from more-expensive chi generators into Soothing Mist, which is still just as cheap as before. Doing the math with the new mana values (edited above if you want in-detail) works out to 110 Haste being equivalent to 44.23 Spirit (looking at just pure regen, not mana tea), which puts its weights at 0.61/0.60 for RJW/SCK.

    Crit (especially below mana cap)
    Again using 5160 mana from Mana Tea, the +0.0527 Mana Tea stacks per minute per 110 crit rating becomes 0.0527*5160 = 271.932 mana per minute = 22.661 mp5 = 10.995 Spirit, ignoring its new contribution to Mana Tea. Breaking it down by case again, we now have instead:
    Breaking that down further (using BiS crit level, putting base stat weights in brackets for readability):
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap, with RJW): 0.84196*[1.00] + (10.995*[1.41]/110) - (2.2*[0.33]/110) = 0.98
    Crit (to Spirit cap, with SCK): 0.84196*[1.00] + (10.995*[1.34]/110) - (2.2*[0.31]/110) = 0.97
    Crit (beyond Spirit cap, with RJW): 0.84196*[1.00] + (10.995*[0.28]/110) - (2.2*[1.08]/110) = 0.85
    Crit (beyond Spirit cap, with SCK): 0.84196*[1.00] + (10.995*[0.27]/110) - (2.2*[1.08]/110) = 0.85

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I can do a more accurate MS weight when I get some time (by estimating the healing percentage gain from reduced overhealing with Uplift). Also want to do Tertiary stat weights.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Value of BRF 2pc
    The 2pc is hard to quantify since it only applies to healing during SooM. But here’s my current best shot.

    Just a rough estimate:
    When used for chi generation for aoe on a "typical" fight...
    80% of SooM+SM is SooM->SM, 20% is SooM->SM->SM

    SooM->SM
    average +2.5% MS for 2 seconds

    SooM->SM->SM
    average +6.43% MS for 3.5 seconds

    Total average +3.70% MS during SooM, which is +2.22% healing during SooM.

    Of course, even if we know our SooM uptime, we can't convert that into regular Multistrike, because it affects neither ReM casts (unless you SooM into ReM, so we would need an estimate of the percentage of ReMs that are cast from SooM) nor, in particular, Uplifts, since they have a cast time, for sure.

    However, SooM uptime is far from 100%, so we can probably file this under a minor benefit; at 10% uptime it would be less than +0.222% healing, but plus the benefit from extra ReM casts (really only relevant for PoM). We could maybe estimate that, since healing events during SooM does not include Uplift, but may include RJW and ReM, that we could discount this value by 25% as an estimate for PoM, and maybe 15% for CE (only the initial heal of CE benefits from the additional multistrike, which is only about one-third of its total healing; however, CE permits longer SooM casts).

    However, an estimate for the number of ReMs cast from SooM (after adjusting rotation to suit the 2pc when possible) is difficult. We could make a wild guess at 25% of casts. Why I think it’s low: Remember that many ReMs are cast while moving, and one cannot necessarily afford to put off casting it for long to ensure good raid coverage. In addition, we cannot wait to channel SooM+SM before ReM every time, as we would cap ReM charges/cooldowns, especially because ReM is often used as a pre-hot and chi generator during damage lulls.

    So, let’s suppose 25% of ReM casts benefit from the +11% average multistrike (since we only care about the multistrike at the end of the channel). 1% multistrike costs 66 rating, so this is equivalent to 726 multistrike rating. Since we estimated Jade Mist procs as adding +25% value to multistrike, the amount of multistrike’s stat weight that comes from this effect is 0.25/1.25, and its stat weight is 1.09. This adds a value of 1.09*(0.25/1.25)*726*0.25 stat points = 39.57 stat points. Adding this with the raw healing gained, we get…

    (PoM) 0.222*110*0.75 + 1.09*(0.25/1.25)*726*0.25 = 18.32 + 39.57 = 57.89 “stat points”
    (ChiEx) 0.222*110*0.85 = 20.76 “stat points”

    As usual, feel free to debate my estimates in the main thread and I’ll adjust this OP.

    Important note: 2pc is still heavily recommended for its strong benefits in Crane Stance alone.

    Value of BRF 4pc
    The math for 4pc is pretty easy since I already have the worth of 1 Chi on my PS/CB spreadsheet: At full value of 2 chi every 45 seconds, that's about +5.44% total healing. Pretty strong.

    5.44% total healing is worth 5.44*110 = 598.4 "stat points", and if you're using the crit weight of 0.98 for below mana cap RJW, equivalent to 0.98*598.4 = 586.4 crit. This math is for maximum value, so for example, if you're not using enough surging and only get 50% of the max value, then you multiply all these numbers by 0.50 (50%), which is still enough stats to potentially make up for dropping one item by 15 ilvls.

    For example, if dropping from your heroic pants to normal tier pants costs you 100 “stat points” using the above stat weights, but it gets you your final tier piece for the 4pc, then you’d want to do that for almost every boss, because that’s an upgrade even if you only get a little bit of use out of the 4pc (>= 100/598.4 as a fraction of the 4pc usage would be an upgrade).

    4pc is recommended because (a) it has decent Crane Stance benefits, like the 2pc, (b) tier itemization is decent so you don’t lose important stats going for it, and (c) it’s pretty decent in Serpent Stance. Though there’s some debate about (c), the math above is pretty clear that the 4pc has high potential. I think those who undervalue 4pc don’t consider that the 4pc is free chi off the GCD, which is high in value, not to mention bursty, the latter of which was not included in its mathematical worth above. It’s only really devalued by its low usage percentage (frequently well below 100%), but as I detailed, that doesn’t really make it weak enough to ignore, IMHO.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Tertiary Stat weights

    The value of a socket or a warforged item has always been clear, but what about choosing between an item with a tertiary stat and a similar item without? How good are these tertiary stats? Should you really drop throughput for move speed? Let’s try to answer these questions.

    First, I had to track down the newer ratings per % for Speed, Leech, and Avoidance. (For those who were not aware, they were buffed by 4 times at some point, patch 6.1 I think.)

    (Contrast to 110.0 Crit Rating per 1% Crit, so these are much cheaper to get 1% now.)
    Speed: 28.5 rating per 1%
    Leech: 70.0 rating per 1%
    Avoidance: 25.0 rating per 1%

    Examples I had on-hand for reference (the rating your item gets depends on slot and ilvl):
    ilvl 700 bracers with 103 Speed Rating = +3.61% Move Speed
    ilvl 685 helm with 159 Leech Rating = +2.27% Leech
    ilvl 700 staff with 183 Avoidance Rating = +7.32% Avoidance

    That’s a fair bit of % just from one item. Note also that Tertiary Stats do not have diminishing returns, since one typically has none or almost none of each stat. This assists greatly in their worth.

    Avoidance

    Considering nearly all damage a healer takes is from AoE, we can probably estimate AoE damage reduction as worth 95% of complete damage reduction. Following that, we have the worth of damage reduction from our Versatility calculations. Recall that we divided the damage reduction by 22 and then took the inverse to approximate healing gain per healer. We had the following for 0.5% damage reduction:

    3 Healers: +0.068197% healing done by the monk
    4 Healers: +0.090929% healing done by the monk
    5 Healers: +0.113662% healing done by the monk
    6 Healers: +0.136394% healing done by the monk
    We also gave the damage reduction from Versatility a 15% unreliability penalty, since raid mechanics target random people, so you can’t necessarily count on the damage reduction helping you out in a pinch.

    0.5% damage reduction costs only 12.5 Avoidance rating (before the 5% penalty from being AoE-only). Thus, the weights:

    3 Healers: 0.068197*(110/12.5)*0.95*0.85 = 0.48
    4 Healers: 0.090929*(110/12.5)*0.95*0.85 = 0.65
    5 Healers: 0.113662*(110/12.5)*0.95*0.85 = 0.81
    6 Healers: 0.136394*(110/12.5)*0.95*0.85 = 0.97

    The stat weights vary by healer count much more than Versatility, so it’s dangerous to estimate it using 4 healers. One should take into account whatever current content uses most often, e.g. 5 healers for BRF, or 4 or 5 healers for Highmaul (could estimate as 4.5 healers and take the mean of the two).

    Leech

    Leech is a lot of raw healing on yourself, but it tends to have significantly more overhealing than other spells, seeing even up to 70% overhealing on fights with 50% overall overhealing (a 20/50=40% value loss). This seems to be pretty consistently the case throughout BRF, excepting a few bosses with near constant damage, so let’s penalize Leech by 35% for additional overhealing.

    Note that the total overhealing of Leech just determines for its average healing. The unreliability of Leech is not included in its average healing, so we’ll only penalize it an additional 15% for unreliability, as we did for the damage reduction component of Versatility and Avoidance, since it only heals the Monk.

    Then the weight is as follows:
    1.0*(110/70)*0.65*0.85 = 0.87.

    Speed

    Speed is tough to say because it doesn’t add any significant throughput gain. Even on the most movement-intensive Mythic fight, Operator Thogar, the top Mistweaver log right now has 99.90% active time (i.e. used 99.90% of his GCDs). 10th place? 99.99%. 20th place? 99.69%. There’s not really much room there to gain HPS by spending less time moving, at least for Mistweaver in particular! Perhaps at most 0.5% healing by getting to your destinations instantly. So that’s, what, +0.5% healing per +300% move speed? That’s insanely low value when you put it that way. You could say getting to your destination twice as fast would reduce your downtime in half, but that’s still only +0.25% healing per +110% move speed. That would be a stat weight of 0.25*(110/28.5)/110 = 0.00877, less than even 0.01.

    Having said that, it’s true that the move speed may be nice for ensuring you get out of fire in time, and it’s true that a piece with Speed is better than one without. It does make a small difference. So how can we quantify that difference?

    Let’s suppose that two typical-slot items (say, Gloves) are about 5 “stat points” apart, but the worse one of the two has Speed. This being only a 5/110=0.045% performance gain, we may decide to use the Speed item. If the average slot has about 135 Speed Rating, then we could equate the 135 Speed with +0.045% healing, or +5 “stat points,” which would yield a stat weight of 5/135 = 0.037.

    If you would trade 10 stat points for an item with Speed, that’s 10/135 = 0.074.

    To put it another way that’s more intuitive, for Speed to have a powerful rating like 0.80, +10.00% move speed would be to be as strong as +2.59% Crit, which is significant amount of HPS (about 2.16% healing). I don’t see that happening, in particular because Blizzard will never design a mechanic that needs more than 110% move speed (which you get from your cloak enchant) unless it’s infrequent enough that you could use something like Stampeding Roar for it, in which case your Speed rating won’t matter much either.

    The moral of the story is that I don’t think Speed is very useful to Mistweavers at all, but you could put its weight anywhere from 0.01 to 0.07. Personally, I’ll probably use 0.04, so I’ll put that in the stat table.

    Finally:

    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 2.45
    Static Spirit (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 2.33
    Intellect (715 legendary): 1.89
    Intellect (690 legendary): 1.87
    Intellect: 1.85
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 1.41
    Haste (beyond mana cap*): 1.37
    Spirit procs (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 1.34
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.98
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.97
    Versatility (5 healers): 0.92
    Versatility (4 healers): 0.90
    Leech: 0.87
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.85
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.85
    Avoidance (5 healers): 0.81
    Avoidance (4 healers): 0.65
    Mastery (100% pickup rate): 0.63
    Haste (to mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.61
    Haste (to mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.60
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.49
    Static Spirit (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.47
    Mastery (typical pickup rate): 0.34
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with RJW**): 0.28
    Spirit procs (beyond mana cap*, with SCK**): 0.27
    Speed: 0.04


    * Mana cap definition: In this context, being exactly at the mana cap implies that one could freely spam the most expensive, effective spells for the current given situation for the entire fight without ever running out of mana until the end of the fight (i.e. end the fight with about 0 mana left including 0 Mana Tea stacks).

    ** “RJW” means you’re using RJW as your T90 talent. “SCK” means you’re using Xuen or Chi Torpedo.

    Conclusion: Everything is mostly as expected.

    Versatility is slightly higher than we thought it would be in previous discussion because of low Diminishing Returns compared to ms/crit as well as the nontrivial amount of value gained from the damage reduction. It’s high enough that it becomes more throughput that Crit in the event that you don’t need the mana from Crit’s bonus Mana Tea stacks.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    SIMPLE VERSION for those less familiar with the spec and theorycraft:

    Static* Spirit (to mana cap breakpoint**): 2.45
    Intellect: 1.89
    Spellpower: 1.68
    Spirit procs (to mana cap breakpoint**): 1.41
    Multistrike: 1.09
    Crit (to Spirit mana cap breakpoint**): 0.98
    Versatility: 0.92
    Leech: 0.87
    Crit (beyond Spirit mana cap breakpoint**): 0.85
    Avoidance (5 healers): 0.81
    Avoidance (4 healers): 0.65
    Haste: 0.61
    Static* Spirit (beyond breakpoint**): 0.48
    Mastery: 0.34
    Spirit procs (beyond breakpoint**): 0.28
    Speed: 0.04


    BRF 2pc/4pc at bottom of post

    *Static Spirit means Unbuffed Spirit: anything that’s not a proc or raw mana.
    ** Mana cap is around 1700 Spirit in BRF, but varies a lot by fight. e.g. very low for Flamebender (~1100 assuming Crane outside Firestorms & Wolves) but very high for Blast Furnace (~2000).
    Last edited by Geodew; 2015-08-06 at 02:31 AM. Reason: Keeping this post updated whenever I get the time!
    Legion Mistweaver Stat Weights SPREADSHEET --- Stat weights DISCUSSION THREAD
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  19. #899
    Scroll up to the top of that post. See the little "#899" to the right of the title bar of it? Click that (or just click here), and then bookmark the redirected link to that specific post.

    There it is, the single most comprehensive Mistweaver theorycrafting post of all time.

    Solid estimations
    Solid math
    Sound logic

    If you skipped past that for a TL;DR, stop, go back, bookmark the post and read the entire thing. It doesn't have to be all at once, but if you ever wanted to know what makes MW stats tick, this is it. I won't say it's perfect, after all a sizable chunk is estimations, but it's about as close as you can get without challenging some of the specific estimations or assumptions made which I'm sure Geodew would adjust accordingly if there was a fault.

    I'll be in my bunk dreaming about that post.

  20. #900
    Posts like that make me realize I will never be able to get the most out of my character.

    I wish I could check and confirm it but I just don't understand it.

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