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  1. #81
    The Lightbringer Artorius's Avatar
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    If you want to argue about something as ridiculously pointless as this, at least use the numbers "10" and "6.4" as options. It's the 6.4 kernel, renamed as 10 and officially called 10 now. There isn't anything to argue here.

  2. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Artorius View Post
    If you want to argue about something as ridiculously pointless as this, at least use the numbers "10" and "6.4" as options. It's the 6.4 kernel, renamed as 10 and officially called 10 now. There isn't anything to argue here.
    Well, you could argue that Windows 10 is really Windows 8.2 which was supposed to be a free update for Windows 8.1 users.
    "Every country has the government it deserves."
    Joseph de Maistre (1753 – 1821)

  3. #83
    Legendary! Dukenukemx's Avatar
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    Someone the other day hacked Windows 7 and 8 to receive updates when using CPUs like RyZen or Kabylake.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/31912...7-updates.html

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas82 View Post
    It's just an arbitrary name though, it's not literally version 10 as it's version 7.
    Every name is arbitrary and version 1 wasn't literally version 1, there were versions before it. Version 1 was probably the one with this output "Hello world".
    All right, gentlemen, let's review. The year is 2017 - that's two-zero-one-seven, as in the 21st Century - and I am sorry to say the world has become a pussy-whipped, Brady Bunch version of itself, run by a bunch of robed sissies.

  5. #85
    All I remember about vista is when I got a new computer back then preloaded with vista I changed it to XP within a couple months.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by Elim Garak View Post
    Every name is arbitrary and version 1 wasn't literally version 1, there were versions before it. Version 1 was probably the one with this output "Hello world".
    Version 1 is the first commercial version of a kernel they released.
    If it seems like I am acting stupid, there's probably a good reason for that.

  7. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas82 View Post
    Version 1 is the first commercial version of a kernel they released.
    That's arbitrary af.
    All right, gentlemen, let's review. The year is 2017 - that's two-zero-one-seven, as in the 21st Century - and I am sorry to say the world has become a pussy-whipped, Brady Bunch version of itself, run by a bunch of robed sissies.

  8. #88
    Field Marshal ScorpioRGc1's Avatar
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    Biggest problem Vista had a launch was bad and buggy third-party drivers. The OS itself worked fairly well, and within a few months it was rock solid (again, largely because folks like Nvidia and ATI finally made proper, functional drivers). Folks seem to forget that XP was a broken mess until around Service Pack 2 (which was far larger in scope than SPs typically are), at which point it became a very, very good OS for its time. Having said that, a few weeks with Vista after the driver mess got sorted, I found it nigh impossible to go back to XP; Vista was just better in every way IMO. Same thing happened with Win7 (other than it had a far smoother launch); it was a great improvement over Vista.

    One problem Vista had that wasn't Vista's fault really was a lot of OEMs forced it onto hardware that wasn't really powerful enough to run it (admittedly, Vista had quite a bit higher minimum/recommended specs than XP); notably when it came to RAM. So a lot of folks had a bad experience when they shouldn't have because the likes of Dell or HP and whatnot didn't feel it prudent to put enough memory in their kits for the new software.

    Mind you, I suppose I embrace change a bit better than many seem to. I upgraded to Win8 when it came out despite mourning the loss of Aero Glass and having my doubts about the new Start Screen it introduced (ended up loving it...yes, on a desktop, no less!), immediately updated to 8.1 when it released, and again to Windows 10. After 8, I found it hard to go back to 7; too many things felt primitive or unintuitive; same as I felt trying XP after Vista, and currently feel that way about 7/8 after Windows 10.

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by Elim Garak View Post
    That's arbitrary af.
    Not really.... whatever makes you feel better though.
    If it seems like I am acting stupid, there's probably a good reason for that.

  10. #90
    Field Marshal ScorpioRGc1's Avatar
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    I didn't see the big discussion over kernel version numbers; I remember seeing a few years back Microsoft said they keep it at 6.x post Vista so as not to run into some of the compatibility problems that Vista saw from some older software (often shoddily written, I may add) that did OS version checking as a mechanic to dictate whether their program would even install or not. Again, folks blaming the OS for issues other software caused.

    There may be other reasons they did this too, I forget. These days Windows naming scheme has nothing to do with the kernel version, and I'm not sure how that became such a big discussion in this thread. I mean, they skipped 9 entirely because the post Win8.1 release felt "too big" to be called 9. lol

  11. #91
    Was buggy till you fixed it a bit then they patched it, was better than 8 though. (Everything was better than 8 haha)

  12. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by Amalaric View Post
    I just want to hear what people thinks.
    From a technical standpoint, it could've been much worse. Longhorn (Vista's beta name) had .NET in the NT kernel, which backfired, because .NET is real heavy. Think if the "Open File" dialog in Notepad took 50MB of RAM alone.
    They practically made Vista in the 3 years of development they had left mid-2004 to 2007, when the decision to scrap EVERYTHING up that point, including all Longhorn features (.NET in the kernel, WinFS and all UI/UX) was made.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qmyy-FJGmCc this video glosses over it
    For a total reset like that, I think it's alright, almost impressive. I don't dig the theme though, but I was always a bigger fan of the Windows Classic theme.
    From a sysadmin standpoint, it brought alot of nice features that I use today, like image-based deployment (.wim and sysprep) and Hyper-V.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Squishy Tia View Post
    IMO vista's real problems came in its nagging. I mean constant nagging. Granted UAC was in its infancy then, but come on, even XP at its worst didn't nag that much.
    That's just like, your opinion, man.
    But seriously, XP developers choked when porting or testing their software to Vista, as they had grown lazy when it comes to permissions. When the elevation token was introduced in Vista, aswell as the UAC prompt that would allow user-context applications to elevate, even basic third party applications didn't work without elevation because, as it turns out, developers are fucking stupid at developing secure and stable applications that didn't use potentially destructive APIs or messed with system files.

    Windows 7 didn't fix anything, it only made it worse. I actually hate Microsoft for lowering the default UAC level in Windows 7, because that second-highest level allows you to use UAC backdoors that Microsoft had to put there for those lazy third party devs.
    So, from a security standpoint, second-highest UAC is the same as the lowest UAC (none at all). Here's a collection of many well-known UAC bypasses put into one tool https://github.com/hfiref0x/UACME. None of these work at the highest UAC level.
    Last edited by Exileos; 2017-04-23 at 02:52 PM.

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