1. #1
    Mechagnome Tekloth's Avatar
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    Problems with a freshly built PC

    Long story short; I have a bad processor (my fps is HORRIBLE during raids, ranging from 2-10 in 10mans to 1-4 in 25mans in combat), so I bought a new one, the new one wouldn't get enough power from my PSU because my mobo only has a 20pin atx connector on it, so I bought a new motherboard aswell.

    CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 940 Black Edition
    RAM: 4GB of Kingston DDR2 667MHz RAM
    PSU: Corsair VX550W
    Motherboard: Asus M4A78
    Graphics Card: Sapphire HD4850 Toxic (Factory OC'd)
    OS: WinXP Home 32bit
    Resolution: 1680x1050

    I used CPU-Z to check the RAM, and it said 1 set of 2 had an ECC correction (correction: ECC) and 1 didn't have any correction at all (correction: none), don't know about that though..

    Now then, the problem I'm having:

    I've installed the new components (the motherboard and the processor) into the chassis, and I push the power button on the front: The pc starts, but there's no video feed coming from the card to the monitor, no POST beeps (chassis speaker is plugged in correctly) and the GFX card has both of it's 2 leds, which indicate a power failure (D1601 - Over temp protection enabled, D1602 - EXT 12V fault), blinking. All fans keep spinning as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened, and nothing is being read from the HDD.
    All of the above occurs only with the new mobo+processor, as the graphics card works fine with my current ALiveNF5-eSATA2+ mobo and AMD Athlon 64 x2 4400+ processor.


    Any ideas on what might be wrong?

  2. #2

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    I had a similar situation. I had a 550W PS and I upgraded my CPU, Mobo, and video card. Next thing I knew the screen wasn't turning on. I upgraded my PSU to a 750W and everything roared to life. Could be the fact that you're not pushing enough power to the monitor. Thats what my problem was.

    Side note. If you want to use all 4GB of your RAM, upgrade to 64 bit OS. =P

  3. #3
    Mechagnome Tekloth's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Infinity1337
    I had a similar situation. I had a 550W PS and I upgraded my CPU, Mobo, and video card. Next thing I knew the screen wasn't turning on. I upgraded my PSU to a 750W and everything roared to life. Could be the fact that you're not pushing enough power to the monitor. Thats what my problem was.

    Side note. If you want to use all 4GB of your RAM, upgrade to 64 bit OS. =P
    The funny thing is, I bought the PSU after checking from Corsair's own PSU finder that it should support that processor+gfx card
    Oh well... Anyone interested in buying a Corsair 400W and a Corsair VX550W PSU to fund my new PSU?

    Yeah I know about that, although I do have a 64bit XP installation disk lying around here somewhere, but I can't remember the code for it

  4. #4

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Did you connect the black and yellow 4 pin connector from your ps to the motherboard,right by the cpu is where it goes.

    Also,just a guess,but the 940 cpu that you bought...are you sure it is not 140 watt,as that motherboard only supports up to 125 watt

  5. #5

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    550W should be fine for your computer.

    Does your motherboard has onboard graphics? If you connect your monitor to the onboard graphics instead of the video card, does your monitor get input? If that's the case, try entering the bios and change the default video output to external video card.

  6. #6

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Are you 100% sure that the processor you have is compatible with the motherboard you purchased? If it isn't, that will usually stop the POST beep due to hardware failure and nothing will work until a compatible processor is installed.
    I don't fight because I think I can win....I fight because I have to win.

  7. #7

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    1. Did you carefully read the motherboard owners manual?


    2. Did you plug in the 4/8-pin CPU power connector, located near the CPU? If the motherboard has 8 pins and your PSU only has 4 pins, you can use the 4-pin connector. The 4-pin connector USUALLY goes on the 4 pins located closest to the CPU. If the motherboard has an 8-pin connector with a cover over 4 pins, you can remove the cover and use an 8-pin plug if your power supply has one. Check your motherboard owners manual for more information about the CPU power connector. This is easily the most common new-builder mistake.


    3. Did you install the standoffs under the motherboard? Did you place them so that they all align with the screw holes in the motherboard, with no extra standoffs touching the board in the wrong place?


    4. Did you verify that the video card is fully seated? (may require more force than a new builder expects.)


    5. Did you attach all the required power connectors to the video card? (some need two, some need none, many need one.)


    6. Have you tried booting with just one stick of RAM installed? (Try each stick of RAM individually in each RAM slot.) If you can get the system to boot with a single stick of RAM, you should manually set the RAM speed, timings, and voltage to the manufacturers specs in the BIOS before attempting to boot with all sticks of RAM installed.


    7. Did you verify that all memory modules are fully inserted? (may require more force than a new builder expects.) It's a good idea to install the RAM on the motherboard before it's in the case.


    8. Did you verify in the owners manual that you're using the correct RAM slots? Many i7 motherboards require RAM to be installed in the slots starting with the one further away from the CPU which is the opposite of many dual channel motherboards.


    9. Did you remove the plastic guard over the CPU socket? (this actually comes up occasionally.)


    10. Did you install the CPU correctly? There will be an arrow on the CPU that needs to line up with an arrow on the motherboard CPU socket. Be sure to pay special attention to that part of the manual!


    11. If using an after market CPU cooler, did you get any thermal paste on the motherboard, CPU socket, or CPU pins? Did you use the smallest amount you could? Here's a couple links that may help:


    Benchmark Reviews


    Arctic Sliver


    12. Is the CPU fan plugged in?


    13. If using a stock cooler, was the thermal material on the base of the cooler free of foreign material, and did you remove any protective covering? If the stock cooler has push-pins, did you ensure that all four pins snapped securely into place? (The easiest way to install the push-pins is outside the case sitting on a non-conductive surface like the motherboard box. Read the instructions! The push-pins should be turned the OPPOSITE direction as the arrows.)


    14. Are any loose screws laying on the motherboard, or jammed against it? Are there any wires run directly under the motherboard? You should not run wires under the motherboard since the soldered wires on the underside of the motherboard can cut into the insulation on the wires and cause a short. Some cases have space to run wires on the back side of the motherboard tray.


    15. Did you ensure you discharged all static electricity before touching any of your components?


    16. Did you install the system speaker (if provided) so you can check beep-codes in the manual? A system speaker is NOT the same as normal speakers that plug into the back of the motherboard. A system speaker plugs into a header on the motherboard that's usually located near the front panel connectors. If you case or motherboard didn't come with a system speaker you can buy one here: http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html


    17. Did you read the instructions in the manual on how to properly connect the front panel plugs? (Power switch, power led, reset switch, HD activity led) Polarity does not matter with the power and reset switches. If power or drive activity LED's do not come on, reverse the connections. For troubleshooting purposes, disconnect the reset switch. If it is shorted, the machine either will not POST at all, or it will endlessly reboot.


    18. Did you turn on the power supply switch located on the back of the PSU? Is the power plug on a switch? If it is, is the switch turned on? Is there a GFI circuit on the plug-in? If there is, make sure it isn't tripped.


    19. Is your CPU supported by the BIOS revision installed on your motherboard? Most motherboards will post a CPU compatibility list on their website.


    20. Have you tried resetting the CMOS? The motherboard manual will have instructions for your particular board.


    21. If you have integrated video and a video card, try the integrated video port. Resetting the bios, can make it default back to the onboard video.
    But your eyes are drawn of charcoal they're black they're so cold they're so imperfect because they see a sleeping world where waking isn't worth it

  8. #8

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    your psu is more then enough for that system......... i would say that the system you have there uses about 400w

    i think you have a cpu or memory problem

    try and take one memory modul out and see if that helps
    Intel i5 2500K: Asus Masimux IV Extreme: Palit GTX 680 Jetstream: Chieftec Nitro Series 1200W:Corsair H-100 Hydro:
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  9. #9
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Bojangles
    2. Did you plug in the 4/8-pin CPU power connector, located near the CPU? If the motherboard has 8 pins and your PSU only has 4 pins, you can use the 4-pin connector. The 4-pin connector USUALLY goes on the 4 pins located closest to the CPU. If the motherboard has an 8-pin connector with a cover over 4 pins, you can remove the cover and use an 8-pin plug if your power supply has one. Check your motherboard owners manual for more information about the CPU power connector. This is easily the most common new-builder mistake.

    4. Did you verify that the video card is fully seated? (may require more force than a new builder expects.)


    5. Did you attach all the required power connectors to the video card? (some need two, some need none, many need one.)
    One of these would be my guess. Also, yes his motherboard supports his cpu. And that power supply should be enough. I'd personally prefer something a bit more, but I think it'd work.

    Also try swapping memory or using only 1 stick, and try using your mobo graphics to see if its a video card problem.

  10. #10
    Mechagnome Tekloth's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    To Mr_Bojangles:

    1, I always read the manuals before installing the components.

    2, The mobo has a 4-pin and the PSU has a 8-pin (2x4pin which can be split) so yes.

    3, I think that there might have been 1 standoff left over which I didn't bother trying to remove since I didn't have any plyers around to unscrew it.

    4, Yup.

    5, Yeah, mine required 1x6pin.

    6, I've only tried with the pairs so far.

    7, Yeah, all of them were fully seated, and I always put the RAM in before fitting the mobo to the case, the cords are a nightmare to work with not to mention what it would be to try to install 4 sticks of RAM.

    8, Yes I have.

    9, Hmm... What exactly do you mean by this?

    10, CPU's on correctly.

    11, I went with the paste that was already on the CPU cooler.

    12, Yes.

    13, Stock cooler meaning for the CPU? Yeah it was and there was a plastic shield to protect the paste that was already on the cooler.

    14, No.

    15, Yes, but then again I might have missed something.

    16, Yes, read the part on the manual twice to ensure that it was properly attatched

    17, Yes. Although the power led connector (3pin) has the wires connected to 1 and 3, and the new mobo requires them to be either in 1 and 2 or 2 and 3.

    18, Yes I did, yes it is on a switch, which is on ONLY after the new parts are fully installed and I don't think there is a GFI circuit.

    19, I'm not sure about that actually, I was told by a friend that I could just throw the new motherboard in and install the BIOS from the CD that came with it AFTER booting the PC with the new mobo.

    20, No.

    21, This mobo shouldn't have an integrated one.



    I've also tried with my older EN8600GTS, but I get the same results with that one.

  11. #11

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Right so I've had a similar problem here, and my problem was that the CPU I used wasn't supported by default; I had to flash my motherboard first with a new BIOS using an older CPU. Perhaps you can try this?

    Good luck,

    Kami - Guild Wars 2 Elementalist - Desolation EU
    <Obey Gaming> - https://obeygaming.com/

  12. #12

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Tekloth
    Long story short; I have a bad processor (my fps is HORRIBLE during raids, ranging from 2-10 in 10mans to 1-4 in 25mans in combat), so I bought a new one, the new one wouldn't get enough power from my PSU because my mobo only has a 20pin atx connector on it, so I bought a new motherboard aswell.

    CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 940 Black Edition
    RAM: 4GB of Kingston DDR2 667MHz RAM
    PSU: Corsair VX550W
    Motherboard: Asus M4A78
    Graphics Card: Sapphire HD4850 Toxic (Factory OC'd)
    OS: WinXP Home 32bit
    Resolution: 1680x1050

    I used CPU-Z to check the RAM, and it said 1 set of 2 had an ECC correction (correction: ECC) and 1 didn't have any correction at all (correction: none), don't know about that though..

    Now then, the problem I'm having:

    I've installed the new components (the motherboard and the processor) into the chassis, and I push the power button on the front: The pc starts, but there's no video feed coming from the card to the monitor, no POST beeps (chassis speaker is plugged in correctly) and the GFX card has both of it's 2 leds, which indicate a power failure (D1601 - Over temp protection enabled, D1602 - EXT 12V fault), blinking. All fans keep spinning as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened, and nothing is being read from the HDD.
    All of the above occurs only with the new mobo+processor, as the graphics card works fine with my current ALiveNF5-eSATA2+ mobo and AMD Athlon 64 x2 4400+ processor.


    Any ideas on what might be wrong?
    Just looking over your specs (didnt read entire thread), you need new Memory.

    Sure, you have 4GB of it... but what use is that when it runs at 667Mhz?

    Memory Breakdown for Gaming:

    Fast & Large Memory = Great
    Fast & Small Memory = OK
    Slow & Large Memory = Bad
    Slow & Small Memory = Awful

    Your memory is in the "Bad" category.

    I'll read through the rest of the thread to help you on your actual problem soon

  13. #13
    Mechagnome Tekloth's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Yeah I should get faster memory, but the only problem right now is my financial status, having soon spent around 450e on the mobo, processor and 2 PSUs.
    I'm just a poor student without a regular job

  14. #14

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Tekloth
    To Mr_Bojangles:


    3, I think that there might have been 1 standoff left over which I didn't bother trying to remove since I didn't have any plyers around to unscrew it.
    * If you have a stand-off below your main board which doesn't line up with a screw hole on your main board you can short circuit your main board, which could be a cause for the main board not powering up without beeps or anything.
    I'd suggest making sure your main board doesn't touch your case or any stand-off screws.

    * Also as was suggested before, try booting with 1 stick of ram and see if you get any further then.

    Corsair VX550W is a quality PSU and should provide plenty of power for your system. I've got a Cooler Master 550W with a better graphics card and also using a quad core cpu that just runs fine. You could connect your new PSU to your old system to test if there's an issue with your PSU too. If it won't boot either then, you just got a faulty PSu and will have to return it.

  15. #15

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    I used to have a similar problem as you're describing. No POST and nothing.
    After weeks of error seach and in depth research, I found out that my memory module slots were not fully functioning with a specific voltage/hz when I had 3 or more DIMMs plugged in.
    Mobo flaw, sadly. Even though they were supposed to work without a problem. Very uncommon.

  16. #16

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by azuraji
    My new memory is 2000 MHz Corsair Dominator 2x3GB (6GB Kit), do you think it's overkill? I somehow couldn't settle for 1800MHz =))
    I'm sure you can answer your own question Big time overkill ;D
    Kami - Guild Wars 2 Elementalist - Desolation EU
    <Obey Gaming> - https://obeygaming.com/

  17. #17
    not good with computers
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Especially considering there is a 99% chance it is running at much slower speeds unless you went and manually set them.

  18. #18
    Mechagnome Tekloth's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Bumping 'dis up incase someone would come up with more answers.

  19. #19

    Re: Problems with a freshly built PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Tekloth
    Bumping 'dis up incase someone would come up with more answers.
    What suggestions have you tried so far? Are you 100% sure everything is connected properly? Maybe you can take some photos and upload them, so we know what it looks like in your system. Have you tried with minimal hardware? (PSU/mobo/fans/RAM (just one!)?
    Kami - Guild Wars 2 Elementalist - Desolation EU
    <Obey Gaming> - https://obeygaming.com/

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