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  1. #1
    Blademaster
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    Buying a new computer, need info on "Overclocking"

    Hello, thanks for any replies, I'm thinking of purchasing this PC
    Intel® Core™ i7 930 Quad Core Processor - LGA1336 - Overclocked to 3.6GHz
    Microsoft® Windows® 7 Home Premium pre-installed
    Thermaltake Element 'S' Gaming Chassis
    1050W Infinity Desktop Power Supply
    Performance Pack - Akasa Freedom Tower quiet Heat pipe quiet cooling, Performance updates, specialist cabling
    Asus P6X58D-E-USB3 - Intel Core™ i7 & i7 Extreme Edition - LGA1366 Socket(ATX)
    G.Skill 8GB DDR3 1600MHz Memory (4x 2GB KIt)
    1.5TB Serial ATA 2 Hard Drive with 32MB Buffer
    22x Dual Layer DVD Writer Super Format +R/-R/RW/RAM
    1GB ATI Radeon HD5870 Graphics Accelerator
    7.1 High Definition onboard sound card - for 8 Channel Cinema sound
    Free Microsoft® Office 2010 Starter Edition
    Free 3 Years Gold Warranty - inc 3 Months Free Collect & Return

    I'm just wondering, is there any things i should know about the overclocking of the i7 quad core processor? Any bad things about it or anything like that?

    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Well you're asking the thing to do more than it was intended to do so that right there tells you it will shorten the lifetime of the CPU. With that said, I don't think I've heard of anyone's chips dying if they're doing what is now considered "Normal" Overclocking.

    As long as you don't let the temperature go beyond the thresholds, I don't see why an overclocked CPU won't last as long as a non-overclocked CPU.

    Since you're buying this system from a manufacturer, you should ask them what their warranty is on overclocked rigs. If it covers it like a normal computer, then go with it.
    Last edited by op3l; 2010-07-05 at 04:54 AM.

  3. #3
    3.6ghz is a very conservative overclock for the i7 930. Most people clock them to 4.0-4.2ghz as "the norm". Above average OC's for that processor are in the high 4's.

    What I find weird about that rig is, it is using a dual channel memory configuration when it shold be using tri channel. (not in pairs, but in triplets.)
    2x Intel Xeon 5680 12 Cores (2x6 Cores)@ 5.0ghz.* EVGA Classified SR-2 Motherboard.*Kingston Hyper-X 48gb(12x4gb) DDR3 1600.* 3x OCZ Colossus SSD 1.5gb (3x500gb) Raid 0.* 2x Enermax 1250W PSU. 4x EVGA GTX 480 Quad-SLI.* Samsung F3 1TB Storage Drive.* Custom Watercooled (EK 2xCPU/4xGPU Blocks, 2xMCP655 Pumps, 3xXSPC Dual Bay Reservoirs, 3x480 GTX Radiators, 24x Scythe GentleTyphoon AP15 Fans in Push/Pull).* 3x Dell 3008wfp 30" IPS Monitors.* ASUS Xonar D2X 7.1 PCIe

  4. #4
    With the 930 you'll comfortably be able to push it to 4Ghz with that cooler. I expect the case will come set up for decent airflow, so you won't have to worry.

    Jiran - they probably do that to flog a bit of spare memory.

  5. #5
    Blademaster
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    Thanks a lot for all the answers, Understand more now ;p.

  6. #6
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    Overclocking improves the speed of which your processor runs at, however, overclocking DRAMATICALLY decreases your processers lifespan, so eg something that would last 10 years, will maybe last around 2 or 3 years after overclocking. If you plan on replacing your PC / processor every 2 years or so - go for it.

    Edit* I also forgot to mention Overclocking is fairly dangerous aswell, it makes your processor overheat alot, so good circulation with fans is needed. Also, overclocking will void your 3 year gold warranty, so if it breaks, you cant send it back.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    .
    Edit* I also forgot to mention Overclocking is fairly dangerous aswell, it makes your processor overheat alot, so good circulation with fans is needed. Also, overclocking will void your 3 year gold warranty, so if it breaks, you cant send it back.
    It comes overclocked, not doing it myself so its still covered by 3 year warranty so I'm fairly certain I'm going to purchase this pc, But thanks very much for the added information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iNarrux View Post
    It comes overclocked, not doing it myself so its still covered by 3 year warranty so I'm fairly certain I'm going to purchase this pc, But thanks very much for the added information.
    It comes overclocked =o? Im assuming your buying this from ebay or something, as far as im aware stores dont sell overclocked machines.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    Overclocking improves the speed of which your processor runs at, however, overclocking DRAMATICALLY decreases your processers lifespan, so eg something that would last 10 years, will maybe last around 2 or 3 years after overclocking. If you plan on replacing your PC / processor every 2 years or so - go for it.

    Edit* I also forgot to mention Overclocking is fairly dangerous aswell, it makes your processor overheat alot, so good circulation with fans is needed. Also, overclocking will void your 3 year gold warranty, so if it breaks, you cant send it back.
    I believe you're terribly misinformed about overclocking. Overclocking will not make your processor overheat unless you're overclocking on a terrible heatsink, in that situation you probably shouldn't have even begun to overclock (overheating can happen at stock if your BIOS automatically manages voltage). Overclocking will not void a warranty from either Intel or AMD, they'd never even know it was overclocked even if the silicon has melted; that doesn't mean go torch your CPU if you want a replacement since they probably won't replace or repair physical alterations. And finally lifespan: There's no way to estimate or place a number on the lifespan of any CPU, overclocking rarely reduces lifespan unless the CPU is already close to its breaking point, you just need to be safe and stay within the limits documented by the manufacturer.

    Long story short: Proper cooling goes a long way, as long as you're watching your temperatures and aren't overvolting past the documented max voltage you'll be 100% fine. Spreading misinformation is a really bad thing, even if you're trying to help someone. You really need to do a lot more research and discussions with people more knowledgeable, a lot of your posts in this forum are wrong.
    Errors using inadequate data are much less than those using no data at all. - Charles Babbage

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by None View Post
    I believe you're terribly misinformed about overclocking. Overclocking will not make your processor overheat unless you're overclocking on a terrible heatsink, in that situation you probably shouldn't have even begun to overclock (overheating can happen at stock if your BIOS automatically manages voltage). Overclocking will not void a warranty from either Intel or AMD, they'd never even know it was overclocked even if the silicon has melted; that doesn't mean go torch your CPU if you want a replacement since they probably won't replace or repair physical alterations. And finally lifespan: There's no way to estimate or place a number on the lifespan of any CPU, overclocking rarely reduces lifespan unless the CPU is already close to its breaking point, you just need to be safe and stay within the limits documented by the manufacturer.

    Long story short: Proper cooling goes a long way, as long as you're watching your temperatures and aren't overvolting past the documented max voltage you'll be 100% fine. Spreading misinformation is a really bad thing, even if you're trying to help someone. You really need to do a lot more research and discussions with people more knowledgeable, a lot of your posts in this forum are wrong.
    I didnt realise AMD or Intel had their own line of computers that you could purchase. If you EG buy your computer from Dell, or Ebuyer, or PCworld, or any store, by overclocking, you void the warranty, just like taking the side of the computer off, you void the warranty. Also, overclocking definately does reduce the lifespan of your processor, i dont want to argue about it, but it does :P

  11. #11
    I was talking about the manufacturer warranty, I probably should have read the bottom two lines of the computer description and could have assumed it was either customized or pre-built, even though my post did make it clear that I was speaking specifically about manufacturer warranties. Either way my post still stands, and I should also mention that on any other computer forum spreading misinformation is enough to warrant a warning or ban.
    Errors using inadequate data are much less than those using no data at all. - Charles Babbage

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    It comes overclocked =o? Im assuming your buying this from ebay or something, as far as im aware stores dont sell overclocked machines.
    http://www.meshcomputers.com/ Is where i bought it from, I Bought my old computer from here too.

    Also thanks again to everyone who replied.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    I didnt realise AMD or Intel had their own line of computers that you could purchase. If you EG buy your computer from Dell, or Ebuyer, or PCworld, or any store, by overclocking, you void the warranty, just like taking the side of the computer off, you void the warranty. Also, overclocking definately does reduce the lifespan of your processor, i dont want to argue about it, but it does :P
    Given the ease of overclocking with newer boards and processors, many companies have taken to selling - and offering warranties/guaranties on - overclocked systems/bundles. I myself bought an i7 920 clocked at 4Ghz, board, memory and HSF.

    Also, not sure if it applies in the US, but UK law covering electronics classes computers as user maintainable items, and thus the warranty cannot be voided if you disassemble it. If they (the OEM/store) can prove your interference caused the damage (beyond reasonable doubt) thats another matter.

  14. #14
    Warchief Dethh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    I didnt realise AMD or Intel had their own line of computers that you could purchase. If you EG buy your computer from Dell, or Ebuyer, or PCworld, or any store, by overclocking, you void the warranty, just like taking the side of the computer off, you void the warranty. Also, overclocking definately does reduce the lifespan of your processor, i dont want to argue about it, but it does :P
    Few things:
    OEM brands like Dell,Compaq,Gateway etc lock their processors so you cant overclock them so no need to worry about voiding any warranties.
    Secondly taking the side of your computer does not void any brands warranty that I have ever seen.
    No, overclocking will not in anyway reduce the lifespan of you processor excessive heat will which can be a by-product of BAD overclocking.

    I once linked a guide to OC'ing the I series but the moderator here bashed it not knowing what he was talking about. Not realizing they changed the voltages of his own chip that hes running.

  15. #15
    Moderator Cilraaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dethh View Post
    Secondly taking the side of your computer does not void any brands warranty that I have ever seen.
    Very, very old OEM warranties would be voided by taking the case side off (like mid-90's). That hasn't happened in a long time, though.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cilraaz View Post
    Very, very old OEM warranties would be voided by taking the case side off (like mid-90's). That hasn't happened in a long time, though.
    My old computer, that i bought in 2006 from PCworld had a warranty sticker on the side, and by removing the side panel, it broke the sticker - same with the computer before that, in 2002, I do live in the UK though, so things may be different.

    edit* Also cilraaz, can you clarify as to wrether or not Overclocking decreases the lifespan of your processor? Its been a while since i learnt about overclocking, so my memory is a little fuzzy.
    Last edited by Warchief94; 2010-07-06 at 12:25 PM.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Warchief94 View Post
    edit* Also cilraaz, can you clarify as to wrether or not Overclocking decreases the lifespan of your processor? Its been a while since i learnt about overclocking, so my memory is a little fuzzy.
    disclaimer: the following is oversimplified and may be slightly inaccurate but illustrates the principle

    It depends mostly on how hot the hardware runs. Let's assume for example CPU is rated to run at 50C under normal circumstances and stock cooler, and will melt at 100C. If you stick watercooler into it that reduces the temp to 30C and then crank up speed to double and temp's back to 50C it shouldn't have any effect whatsoever to the life expectancy of the CPU. But... If you use cheaper air cooler and crank the speed up so far that the CPU runs at 70C for example, that will reduce the lifetime of the components. How significantly is really hard to say.

    The bigger risk in overclocking and hardware lifetime comes from the little fact that most overclocking guides start with "turn off this and that security feature". When those security systems are disabled, small problems like CPU fan suddenly breaking would in normal case just turn off the computer and refuse to start before the fan is fixed, but when the safety's off, the computer wont shut down before the CPU melts unless you realize in 5-10 seconds that the fan broke and you pull the plug yourself.
    Never going to log into this garbage forum again as long as calling obvious troll obvious troll is the easiest way to get banned.
    Trolling should be.

  18. #18
    Moderator Cilraaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vesseblah View Post
    disclaimer: the following is oversimplified and may be slightly inaccurate but illustrates the principle

    It depends mostly on how hot the hardware runs. Let's assume for example CPU is rated to run at 50C under normal circumstances and stock cooler, and will melt at 100C. If you stick watercooler into it that reduces the temp to 30C and then crank up speed to double and temp's back to 50C it shouldn't have any effect whatsoever to the life expectancy of the CPU. But... If you use cheaper air cooler and crank the speed up so far that the CPU runs at 70C for example, that will reduce the lifetime of the components. How significantly is really hard to say.
    This is pretty much accurate. However, you also have to consider that anything over a minor (ie, not really worth it) overclock will likely require a voltage adjustment. Bumping voltages to higher ranges adds extra wear to the CPU, lowering its lifespan shortly. CPUs are made to run for a very long time. I just replaced my webserver's 1.1GHz AMD Thunderbird, produced in mid-2000, and that was only to upgrade it. It probably has years left in it. Even a large overclock is assumed to cut a CPU's lifespan in half under proper cooling and without exceeding safe voltages. At that point, you have a chip capable of running for 15 years that is now viable for 7 or 8. The vast majority of people doing an overclock will replace that CPU inside 7 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by vesseblah View Post
    The bigger risk in overclocking and hardware lifetime comes from the little fact that most overclocking guides start with "turn off this and that security feature". When those security systems are disabled, small problems like CPU fan suddenly breaking would in normal case just turn off the computer and refuse to start before the fan is fixed, but when the safety's off, the computer wont shut down before the CPU melts unless you realize in 5-10 seconds that the fan broke and you pull the plug yourself.
    Any guide that tells you to disable safety features isn't worth following. Disable CPU stepping and power saving features, sure... but never the failsafes.

    Probably the biggest risks of overclocking are heat and voltage. A proper cooler can solve the first. Voltage, however, requires the person doing the overclock to learn the specifications of the chip they're overclocking and not exceed a safe voltage. Going above spec on any voltage can fry your chip/board instantly, within a week, within a month...

    Oh, and dear lord, for anyone thinking of overclocking: always do your voltages manually! Letting your motherboard assign voltages on its own is a good way to produce unnecessary heat, limit your overclock (based on running out of heat/voltage head room), or kill your chip.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by FlawlessSoul View Post
    With the 930 you'll comfortably be able to push it to 4Ghz with that cooler. I expect the case will come set up for decent airflow, so you won't have to worry.

    Jiran - they probably do that to flog a bit of spare memory.
    at the expense of system performance. 6gigs DDR3 in tri channel is faster than 8 gigs in dual channel.
    2x Intel Xeon 5680 12 Cores (2x6 Cores)@ 5.0ghz.* EVGA Classified SR-2 Motherboard.*Kingston Hyper-X 48gb(12x4gb) DDR3 1600.* 3x OCZ Colossus SSD 1.5gb (3x500gb) Raid 0.* 2x Enermax 1250W PSU. 4x EVGA GTX 480 Quad-SLI.* Samsung F3 1TB Storage Drive.* Custom Watercooled (EK 2xCPU/4xGPU Blocks, 2xMCP655 Pumps, 3xXSPC Dual Bay Reservoirs, 3x480 GTX Radiators, 24x Scythe GentleTyphoon AP15 Fans in Push/Pull).* 3x Dell 3008wfp 30" IPS Monitors.* ASUS Xonar D2X 7.1 PCIe

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiran View Post
    at the expense of system performance. 6gigs DDR3 in tri channel is faster than 8 gigs in dual channel.
    Obviously, but what does the seller care? They flog a couple of dual-channel pairs instead of a single triple channel kit. They don't promise a certain level of performance.

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