Thread: IQ tests

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  1. #21
    In simplest form, IQ is supposed to be indicative of how well you learn and use information. Having a higher than average IQ just means you will likely learn faster than other. This dosn't necessarily make you smarter than somebody with a lower IQ, as actual knowledge you have (not the pace of which you can aquire it) determines that. I will agree that IQ tests do little to show for creativity. The test makers probably don't care enough about possible art/music majors to add in questions, and the art/music majors probably aren't that interested in their IQ anyways.

  2. #22
    Fluffy Kitten Badpaladin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delilith View Post
    The way my country is set up prevents me from taking harder classes, we have 3 basic levels of education (VMBO-HAVO-VWO) with VWO being the precursor to university, but apart from getting into VWO there is no harder or easier, which is one of the things I dislike about my country, I do extracurriculars but I still feel like the school should be more challenging.
    Is there some kind of community college or university with an open university program that you could convince your parents to let you take classes in? I don't know how it works where you are, but in the states you can take courses as an "enrichment program" at a college or university, just so long as you meet the regular requirements of pre-college material(ie...you take your biology, chemistry, history, math up to algebra II, etc). If not, then I'd recommend going out for a sport if you're not already. They're at least time consuming, so you'd have something else to do.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badpaladin View Post
    Is there some kind of community college or university with an open university program that you could convince your parents to let you take classes in? I don't know how it works where you are, but in the states you can take courses as an "enrichment program" at a college or university, just so long as you meet the regular requirements of pre-college material(ie...you take your biology, chemistry, history, math up to algebra II, etc). If not, then I'd recommend going out for a sport if you're not already. They're at least time consuming, so you'd have something else to do.
    Unfortunately the universities that do these enrichment programs are all at least 150 kilometers away (which is quite a way to go, something like 85 miles I believe).
    Taking up a sport sounds like a good idea, I should lose some of my excess weight anyway.

  4. #24
    Fluffy Kitten Badpaladin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delilith View Post
    Unfortunately the universities that do these enrichment programs are all at least 150 kilometers away (which is quite a way to go, something like 85 miles I believe).
    Taking up a sport sounds like a good idea, I should lose some of my excess weight anyway.
    Yyyyooouccch 150 KM? That sucks. But yeah, a sports are just great all around. Even just considering time spent, because you'll have X amount of hours devoted to whatever sport you go out for, you'll have that much less time to be bored with easy school work.
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  5. #25
    Take an IQ test from a foreign country, then you will see how utterly useless they are.

    It is not a broad test of knowledge, it's like putting someone on a chinese version of Jeopardy and laughing at them when they don't know who the three kingdoms in Romance of the Three Kingdoms were.

    Some things are just not culturally relevant and most things are not relevant to the pigeon hole nature of most career paths.

  6. #26

    IQ tests are fun

    Given that this is my field of practice (BA in Psych, Masters in Counseling) I'll put in what I've gathered from my experiences.

    The definition of intelligence is something that has been worked on for hundreds of years and is still being worked on to this very day. Recent theories take into account the prospect of a person having multiple intelligences because most of us have strengths and weaknesses. Current theory basically is going along the lines that intelligence is a composite of several functions. A combination of abilities required for survival and advancement within your particular culture.

    As far as testing goes, the common punch line "IQ tests only measure how well you do on IQ tests" is a show of ignorance more than anything else. They do measure important qualities of intelligence, while we will never grasp them all; you'd be surprised just how much is currently taken account for in the two most common IQ tests administered.

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale measures 4 domains with many tests in each:

    Verbal Comprehension Index via:
    Testing vocabulary: Word knowledge.
    Identifying similarities: Identifying similarities between two dissimilar words and describing how they are similar.
    Information processing: Ability to acquire, retain, and retrieve general knowledge.
    There is also an optional test for verbal reasoning: Identifying the common concept being described in a series of clues.

    Perceptual Reasoning Index via:
    Block design: Measures the ability to analyze and synthesize abstract visual stimuli. Viewing and recreating what the design with specially colored blocks.
    Matrix Reasoning: Examining a matrix that is missing something, you then select the missing portion from a group of options. Measures fluid intelligence, concentration, attention to detail, general nonverbal intelligence.
    Visual Puzzles: Measure your visual-motor skills.

    Working Memory Index via:
    Arithmetic: Math. Measures mental manipulation, short and long term memory. Problems are presented orally and there is a time limit.
    Digit Span: You must repeat numbers in the same order as read to you. Also the second portion requires you repeat them backward. Measures short term memory, concentration, and sequencing ability.
    Optionally a letter-number sequencing test: Measuring processing speed and numerical ability. You must read a sequence of numbers and letters and recall the numbers in ascending order; the letters in alphabetical order.

    Processing Speed Index via:
    Coding: Copying symbols paired with simple shapes or numbers. Measures short term memory, learning ability, visual perception, visual scanning, visual-motor coordination, cognitive flexibility and even motivation.
    Optionally a test for symbol searching: A very odd twist on a game you may have played as a child called "memory". Measures much of what coding does as well as visual discrimination and processing speed. (many tests have a timer)
    Optionally as well a test on cancellation: Scanning a random and a structured arrangement of pictures and making the 'target' pictures within a time limit. Processing speed, visual selective attention, visual neglect, and vigilance.

    And of course after it's all said and done you have a General Ability Index: A statistically generated score based on the results of all previous tests. This score has a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15. It's commonly called an IQ.

    The other big test is the Stanford-Binet. I'm rather tired as it's nearing two in the morning so I'll cut to the chase with this one.

    The SB is broken into two domains Non-verbal Intelligence and Verbal Intelligence. Both VI and NVI are each measured by the same five subdomains:

    Fluid Reasoning: Ability to solve novel problems
    General Knowledge: Accumulated knowledge you've gained in your life.
    Quantitative reasoning: Solving problems with numbers or numerical concepts.
    Visual-Spatial Processing: The ability to see patterns and manipulate visual images, 3D objects, or geographic shapes.
    and Working Memory: Ability to store information in the short term and sort or transform that information.

    If you've bothered to read all that, I'm sure you understand there's quite a bit being measured. These tests are rather general though. There are specialized intelligence tests which take into account or focus on things such as musical ability, coordination, dexterity, and all sorts of interesting things. Creating a single test to grasp everything is impossible. Partly because it would take ages to finish it (either creating or taking) and secondly because I don't think we'll ever have a 'full' account of what is included in intelligence. Though I believe we have a respectable grasp on it now as compared to a hundred years ago.

  7. #27
    Dreadlord Lollis's Avatar
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    Unless the test is done multiple times over different days (with different questions obviously) the IQ of a person cannot be taken seriously as a baseline for someone's intelligence. The fact is that all people perform differently on tests for many reasons other than actual intelligence. Fatigue, illness, dehydration, happiness, etc. all play a role.

    If such a criteria is met where everyone is in absolute peak condition, even then the tests should be re-sat a few times simply due to luck - many people guess answers.

  8. #28
    Genius requires no brilliance. You need only the plodding perseverance of duration.

  9. #29
    I'd read what Frrazalie typed: that's basically how IQ tests work these days.

  10. #30
    I am Murloc! Tiili's Avatar
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    Doesn't really mean that much to me. I've done a IQ test in real-life, ended up at 104 which would probably be average. Doing IQ tests on the internet though.. that's pretty useless, I can easily score up towards 120-130 on internet tests..

  11. #31
    I would also go along with frrAzalie, as he explained pretty much everything you have to know about IQ tests. However IQ tests and their results are not set in stone and one might reach 100 on his first try, but accomplish far above that his second or third try. This is because we can adapt to problems that are presented to us and can solve them a lot faster as we continue to practice. This is also the reason why an academically accomplished person will usually score higher on those test than an average construction worker for example, because he is just more practiced in those given problems. The construction worker though may still be smarter and more 'intelligent' (of course this is not always the case but it is a possibility)

    Our measured intelligence simply changes due to different problems that are being presented to us on a daily base over years. Once you graduate school you might be above average, but if you stop practicing those specific problems that are taken as indicators in those test your results will steadily decline.

  12. #32
    IQ tests mean nothing to me. I can take tests really well... ooh... I don't really believe that I have an IQ of 167... but it's documented as such, so I'll take it.

    I'm quite stupid, but I am exceptional at logical thinking, pattern recognition and have very convoluted reasoning skills... you give me a test on any subject I have a basic understanding of, and I will ace it, you ask me to explain something that I have a basic understanding of... ha. HA. You're funny.

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by ChaosEater View Post
    In simplest form, IQ is supposed to be indicative of how well you learn and use information. Having a higher than average IQ just means you will likely learn faster than other. This dosn't necessarily make you smarter than somebody with a lower IQ, as actual knowledge you have (not the pace of which you can aquire it) determines that. I will agree that IQ tests do little to show for creativity. The test makers probably don't care enough about possible art/music majors to add in questions, and the art/music majors probably aren't that interested in their IQ anyways.
    i agree. brother and me did the Mensa IQ testing, he is younger then me 7 yrs. My score was 120 IQ, his was 175 IQ. And diff between us is that i was studying in high school a lot for good grades, he bearly touched the books during his high school and did about good as me. To learn words from some new song i need to listen the song a dozen time, he learns the words in 2-3 listening. He makes Rubic Cube in 2 mins, i can bearly do it under 5 mins. So hes mind works much faster then my, but my knowladge is like 2-3times bigger then his.

    He doesnt read books or articles on various subject, watch documentaries, etc. he only plays video games and kinda lacks ambitions to use that high IQ in something. So high IQ doesnt guarentee a lot in your life if you doesnt put it in use

  14. #34
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    My IQ varies sooo much depending on the test given. I mean, it is generally considered that I am intelligent, but I have horrible problems visualising things, to the point where I do not see symetry in maths. So, on numbers, I do well. On spotting patterns, I do well. But then they come out with stuff about shapes and I dont see it. This is why I place little value on IQ because different people are good at different things.

    Incidentally tho, I would much much much rather some program like that. In Britian everything is mixed ability, at least in my school. It means the smart kids get bored and stop showing up to lessons, and the less smart kids get confused. Its useful to no one.

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