View Poll Results: Is it ok to stay "disrespected"?

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  • No, and you're damn fool if you do

    5 23.81%
  • Yes, it's a fine fine word

    16 76.19%
  1. #1

    "Disrespected" Nails on a chalkboard or perfectly cromulet word?

    My vote? That is not a word. No one should use it. People who say it should go the special hell with child molesters and people who talk at the theater. (RIP Shepherd Book)

  2. #2
    it's in the dictionary, it's a word. there is no debate, there is no conversation, there is your answer.
    end of thread.
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  3. #3
    The Lightbringer Calzaeth's Avatar
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    http://english.oxforddictionaries.co..._gb0232390.002

    Any other words you'd like to check? =D
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  4. #4
    The Patient Vekrah's Avatar
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    First of all, it's cromulent. Classic SAT stuff.

    Second, what is this I don't even...

    Rathalir Emberlight of the Crystal Desert realm

  5. #5
    Herald of the Titans -Ethos-'s Avatar
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    Disrespected doesnt sound right to the ear at all.

  6. #6
    Field Marshal TheScorched's Avatar
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    Disrespect (verb): to regard or treat with contempt.
    -ed: suffix forming the past tense of most English verbs.

    What exactly is your problem with it?

    P.S. I think you meant "cromulent" in your title, not cromulet

  7. #7
    I guess it is a word "technically", but people that say "You disrespected me.", should say "you have shown me disrespect." I think it is one of those words that over time has been changed, so people can be lazier with the English Language.

    Though each unto their own.

  8. #8
    The Patient Vekrah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DariusMDeV View Post
    My vote? That is not a word. No one should use it. People who say it should go the special hell with child molesters and people who talk at the theater. (RIP Shepherd Book)
    Soooo...I'm watching Firefly as I'm reading this. Never seen it before. Shepherd literally just said that as I was reading it, haha. +1 to you, sir, for spying on me.

    Rathalir Emberlight of the Crystal Desert realm

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by krethos View Post
    I guess it is a word "technically", but people that say "You disrespected me.", should say "you have shown me disrespect." I think it is one of those words that over time has been changed, so people can be lazier with the English Language.

    Though each unto their own.
    Is there some reason why the latter is better than the former or did a past tense verb beat up your dad or what
    twenty-four hour skeleton power

  10. #10
    lols, I'm English and hear this used all the time,... whats the big deal? o.O Yes it's a word, yes its commonly used here.

    Personally "quitted" seems more retarded,.. yes its a word, but i have NEVER heard an English person use it,... and have only read it in really old novels.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by helicoptermadeofdraculas View Post
    Is there some reason why the latter is better than the former or did a past tense verb beat up your dad or what
    As i said, it is the "correct" way to use it, though through laziness "disrespected" has become much more widely used, and now features in Oxford Dictionary.

    The latter is just the original and correct way to put across that someone had shown you disrespect.

    Go back a few centuries or go into a really high caliber English Literature forum, and saying "disrepected" would probably have the leaders of such times/places raise an eyebrow at the un-educated English.

    Hell, even I have said disrespected at times, but it just doesn't sound right coming out of my mouth, so I generally re-structure what i have just said the other way around.

    Neither is "better" these days, but if you are going for completely correct English, it would be the latter.

  12. #12
    If it's not a proper word, what word would you suggest to replace it?

    At least it's not as bad as irregardless...

  13. #13
    I love your quote <3 Firefly all the day!

    On topic : If its in the dictionary it is a word, the problem is that people use it wrong.

    A few gold tips and guides I made ^^

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  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by krethos View Post
    The latter is just the original and correct way to put across that someone had shown you disrespect.

    Go back a few centuries or go into a really high caliber English Literature forum, and saying "disrepected" would probably have the leaders of such times/places raise an eyebrow at the un-educated English.

    Hell, even I have said disrespected at times, but it just doesn't sound right coming out of my mouth, so I generally re-structure what i have just said the other way around.

    Neither is "better" these days, but if you are going for completely correct English, it would be the latter.
    According to the OED, it goes back to the 1600s. Those lazy jerks.

    But even so, the idea that there was some point of time when Correct English was definitively established and nobody was allowed to append prefixes or suffixes to words from that point on, no matter how logical they may be*, is weird, to say the least. It's not like there's l'académie d'anglais to rule on these matters.

    * -- This is why "irregardless" bothers me, and why you wouldn't see me defending it--there's no reason for that prefix to be there.
    twenty-four hour skeleton power

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