1. #1

    Windows 7 oem without the opk

    Hi, I'm looking to do my first completely new build here in about a week or two. I think I have everything figured out except for the os. I want to use a oem version of windows 7 (mainly for the price) but recently came across a post that said you must have access to the windows 7 opk before you can do a clean install with an oem disc. Is this true and if so what is the easiest (a.k.a cheapest) way to obtain the opk?

  2. #2
    The Lightbringer Djinni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, UK
    Posts
    3,767
    Firstly whats an opk?

    And no, you can clean install with an OEM disc... the disc itself is exactly the same as a retail disc.
    Even to the point where multiple "versions" of the OS are on the disc, the version installed was just determined by the CD-Key, (not sure if this is the case anymore but cirtainly was when I got my last 3 copies of Win7 OEM.
    Current Project :::: Virtual Private Server hosting and Modded Minecraft admin :::: http://www.refreshprojects.com/
    Fractal Design Define R4 || Intel i7 2600k @ 4.8GHz || Thermaltake Frio Pull/Push || 8GB G.Skill Ripjaws-X || ASUS P8Z68 V-PRO || MSI GTX 560Ti Twin Frozr II/OC || GTX 610 || Samsung 2233RZ || LG IPS236V-PN

  3. #3
    Bloodsail Admiral Wass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Back in Sweden
    Posts
    1,147
    Oem is indeed cheaper but there are a few things you should know before buying one, once installed on a system it's bound to that. You may re-install it on the same machine but you may not transfer it over to a new machine (motherboard). Also, oem versions are not granted free tech support from microsoft should it be needed. If you would ever need that you will have to call the company that you got the machine from. I know, I've worked at the microsoft support.

    This maybe wasn't exactly the info you were looking for but I thought I might give you some input.
    My SC2 stream, bitchz, love goes to Elyaan the Weird and Fantastical Unicorn.
    All I would ever want and need is a hug.

  4. #4
    I am Murloc! M0cha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    5,124
    Quote Originally Posted by Wasselina View Post
    Oem is indeed cheaper but there are a few things you should know before buying one, once installed on a system it's bound to that. You may re-install it on the same machine but you may not transfer it over to a new machine (motherboard). Also, oem versions are not granted free tech support from microsoft should it be needed. If you would ever need that you will have to call the company that you got the machine from. I know, I've worked at the microsoft support.

    This maybe wasn't exactly the info you were looking for but I thought I might give you some input.
    You can call and have it transferred, AFAIK.

  5. #5
    Firstly whats an opk?
    from what i understand its a set of tools (sysprep, DISM, etc.) that are used by pc builders to deploy a oem image to new builds in mass numbers but you have to be a Microsoft partner to have the ability to download and from what i've read on the oem package using it is part of an agreement you enter by breaking the seal.


    I know, I've worked at the microsoft support.
    Great. I was aware of the restrictions and am okay with most but i'm still unsure if i must use the opk do you happen to know?

    Thanks to both of you btw

  6. #6
    Stood in the Fire Plasmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    482
    After a successful assembly of all the components, you just start up the system and (if you want) set the boot order in the BIOS to boot from your optical drive. Then put the DVD in the drive and restart and it will begin the Windows 7 installation. Just ignore whatever you've heard about this OPK business, the OEM version installs just fine.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzykins View Post
    You can call and have it transferred, AFAIK.
    They are under no obligation to do so and can deny it at any time since it actually says you can't in the EULA.

  8. #8
    I haven't ever used Windows 7 OEM so maybe it works differently...but the fun part about XP OEM was that you could install it on any machine you wanted and it would still friggen activate. Maybe Windows 7 is a bit pickier...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Zyzzyx View Post
    I haven't ever used Windows 7 OEM so maybe it works differently...but the fun part about XP OEM was that you could install it on any machine you wanted and it would still friggen activate. Maybe Windows 7 is a bit pickier...
    Yes, you could do so with XP. They changed it for Win7.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Cows For Life View Post
    They are under no obligation to do so and can deny it at any time since it actually says you can't in the EULA.
    It actually does not mention that restriction in the EULA, it's hidden in a FAQ of sorts on Microsoft website.

    You can use the normal automatic reactivation process on OEM version just as well as full retail version at least five times even if you change motherboards or transfer it from one computer to another even if MS says no because it's exactly same software with exactly same restrictions internally. And Microsoft will never pester you with it either as long as you're a paying customer and not a stinking pirate, they aren't complete fools.
    Never going to log into this garbage forum again as long as calling obvious troll obvious troll is the easiest way to get banned.
    Trolling should be.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by vesseblah View Post
    It actually does not mention that restriction in the EULA, it's hidden in a FAQ of sorts on Microsoft website.

    You can use the normal automatic reactivation process on OEM version just as well as full retail version at least five times even if you change motherboards or transfer it from one computer to another even if MS says no because it's exactly same software with exactly same restrictions internally. And Microsoft will never pester you with it either as long as you're a paying customer and not a stinking pirate, they aren't complete fools.
    It's true, obviously MS isn't going to do anything at all if you use OEM incorrectly.

    That being said, as I've said before on OEM postings, it isn't at all difficult, grey, or otherwise confusing what the OEM is for.

    http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/index.aspx

    T
    he entire page is devoted to the info. It is incredibly clear that OEM software is NOT 'authorized' for just anyone to use. It is ONLY for computers sold to customers. The motherboard during installation is the 'tied' board.

    Again, they won't do anything, but it isn't hidden, obscure, or difficult to find.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by vesseblah View Post
    It actually does not mention that restriction in the EULA, it's hidden in a FAQ of sorts on Microsoft website.

    You can use the normal automatic reactivation process on OEM version just as well as full retail version at least five times even if you change motherboards or transfer it from one computer to another even if MS says no because it's exactly same software with exactly same restrictions internally. And Microsoft will never pester you with it either as long as you're a paying customer and not a stinking pirate, they aren't complete fools.
    It does mention it. Example from the license terms of Home Premium:

    OEM:
    2.a. The software license is permanently assigned to the computer with which the software is distributed. That computer is the “licensed computer.”

    Retail:
    2.a. You may install one copy of the software on one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”
    17.a. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer for your use. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Cows For Life View Post
    It does mention it. Example from the license terms of Home Premium:
    It does not mention what parts you are allowed to change and what not in the OEM EULA nor in the package, therefore the motherboard restriction mentioned elsewhere than on the package/store means it's not legally binding in any civilized country.

    It's very questionable if any software EULA is legally binding in the first place since the license terms are not visible anywhere before making purchase, but that's whole other topic.
    Never going to log into this garbage forum again as long as calling obvious troll obvious troll is the easiest way to get banned.
    Trolling should be.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •