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  1. #21
    The only reason why the book is considered a classic is because of it's title. Because of the metaphorical meaning it holds.
    Everything else is terrible.

  2. #22
    It wasn't mandatory here in Portugal, don't think it ever was, but I still read it. I'm big a fan of books as it gets and I did think it was interesting to a certain extent but it's clearly not something I'd see as applicable as far as teenage education nowadays goes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drekmen View Post
    I also don't find anything funny or "cool" when the author writes a book in derp teen language.
    This annoyed me. Very, very much.
    Last edited by Obelodalix; 2011-09-03 at 03:56 PM.

  3. #23
    They should take Catcher in the Rye, throw it into a shredder and read the Iliad instead.



    I really related to EVERY character in that book.
    And it teaches you several good life lessons.

  4. #24
    I had to read it sophomore year and didn't really enjoy the book much but mostly because it was right after reading The Great Gatsby(which is probably my favorite book of all time).
    Last edited by Acquilae; 2011-09-03 at 08:24 PM.
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  5. #25
    My friend and I both had to read this book in 10th grade years ago and we both loved it. I didn't relate to the main character at all, but I was interested the whole time.

  6. #26
    This book should definitely not be replaced. I think it's still relatable to a teenager even in times like these. It just depends on the teenager. Holden was a flawed person and was very unsure about alot of things which made him accessible to me anyways. Even though it was written many years ago I still read it and can relate to it as if I were 16 and reading it again for the first time. I'm only 24 too.
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  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Lansworthy View Post
    I don't find any book really applicable in my life; but I agree, today's generation don't care for books such as this.

    I blame Harry Potter and Twilight.
    If "Catcher in the Rye" is your standard of a quality book you're just as bad.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Powderburn View Post
    Just because the book isn't as applicable to young people today does not mean it lacks literary value. It is a significant part of literary history because of how well it captures the experience of baby boomers. I didn't particularly enjoy the book either, but a knowledge of Catcher in the Rye and its themes does add something to ones understanding of American literature. I fail to see why it isn't an appropriate book for a literature class.

    Most "classical" education isn't about things that are directly applicable to the students everyday lives. It is about building a knowledge base for the student which they can draw, reflect, and converse upon/about as they age. It seems as though Catcher in the Rye served that purpose even for the OP.
    I think being a book that the entire class hates is not a positive. Whether or not it's directly applicable, it should be relatable. To me, for a book to be a 'classic' in needs to have some sort of redeeming aspect that makes it appeal to generation after generation. Catcher lacks this. After much argument, my teacher even conceded to the fact that she will have entire years of classes go by without anyone liking it or feeling a connection to Holden.

  9. #29
    The Patient galimim's Avatar
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    It dated badly. Had to read it 2 years ago and I found it yawningly boring. I can see why it was revolutionary at the time, but social standards have changed so much that the book is just not relevant any more.
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  10. #30

    Catcher in the Rye

    People don’t really like to relate and identify with a book character in the same way as they used to. Today they like to externally relate and then maybe they will relate internally. It has to start with a school setting—the lunch room drama, classes, relationships, etc. and then once they form a bond with a character, they find it easier to relate on a deeper level. The Catcher in the Rye requires deeper thinking and a desire to relate with Holden before you actually do relate. I don’t think teenagers today are inclined to that.

  11. #31
    lol, I feel like I'm reading a South Park episode

  12. #32
    I am so glad I'm not the only one who thinks this book is boring as shit. Don't get me wrong; I love reading books, but I don't find this book enjoyable at all. I hate the main character (didn't even remember his name until you guys mentioned it).

    ---------- Post added 2011-10-25 at 02:49 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by DylanLawrence View Post
    People don’t really like to relate and identify with a book character in the same way as they used to. Today they like to externally relate and then maybe they will relate internally. It has to start with a school setting—the lunch room drama, classes, relationships, etc. and then once they form a bond with a character, they find it easier to relate on a deeper level. The Catcher in the Rye requires deeper thinking and a desire to relate with Holden before you actually do relate. I don’t think teenagers today are inclined to that.
    I don't know how you -can't- externally relate with Holden, it's not like he's some alien with 6 arms and ages backwards. No. He's a normal, teenage kid in school. There's no reason we can't externally relate with him; the author just writes it poorly.

    And your explanation is strange. Why should the reader have to push himself to WANT to relate with a main character that is hard to relate to? The author should make the reader willing to relate with the main character.
    Last edited by vizzle; 2011-10-25 at 06:52 AM.
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  13. #33
    Brewmaster Awbee's Avatar
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    Probably my favorite book to this day. Yeahyeah it's cliché and emo and whatever, but I can just relate to Holden very well throughout large portions of the book.
    Oh yeah, and I'm 22.

  14. #34
    Mechagnome Logbc's Avatar
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    I absolutely love this book. I've read it 3-4 times, I think the first time was in 5th grade like 10 years ago and I read it several more times throughout middle/high school.

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  15. #35
    Loved catcher in the rye, probably my favorite book from high school. I can see why someone could hate it though.

  16. #36
    Bloodsail Admiral Rakatashi's Avatar
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    I very much enjoyed it reading it 3 or so years ago. It's my 4th favorite novel I was forced to read in high school, behind 1984, Animal farm, and Fahrenheit 451.

  17. #37
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    I loved it as well. I read it about 4 years ago when I was 26ish. I would have posted a more eloquent take on the novel as a whole, but I just didn't feel like it.
    Also, his rant about the army and war cracked me up a little.

  18. #38
    Pandaren Monk Willeonge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristie View Post
    I had to read it sophomore year and didn't really enjoy the book much but mostly because it was right after reading The Great Gatsby(which is probably my favorite book of all time).
    seriously? the great gatsby? God how I hated that, only enjoyed the end.
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  19. #39
    I read the book in Highschool (23 now, do the math) and find I could relate quite well.

    The thing about the book is it's not suppose to relate DIRECTLY to teenage boys. Most of the book plays on irony and satire; You're suppose to be able to relate to what is being satirized and the things that are shown to be ironic. Most people read the book as a story and think they're somehow suppose to be able to relate to the things Holden says and does, the things he experiences, etc. but you're not. For example, Holden talks at some point about not believing in God and despising religions (Most teenage boys aren't really religious) but then goes on to talk about how he Admires and respects Jesus (Many teenage boys still believe in God, to some degree, while not being religious). It's these type of things you're suppose to relate to. As a teenage boy of course you don't necessarily hate/disbelieve in God and Religion, but it's unlikely you're very religious. And you likely don't admire Jesus or 'respect' him in the usual sense of the words, but you likely still believe 'he' and/or God exists on some level.

    You get the idea, I won't comb through the entire book again and pull out a ton of examples.
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