View Poll Results: Worth reading the books if you have seen the films?

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  • Yes

    81 86.17%
  • No

    13 13.83%
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  1. #41
    The Lightbringer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ecwfrk View Post
    Agree. They're best quality is how they influenced the genre. On their own, meh.
    There's much better reads out there. Wheel of Time. Black Company. The Renshai trilogies (fun reads). A Song of Ice and Fire (also dry and long winded, but much more intense). Mistborne. The Death Gate Cycle. Discworld... So many good choices.
    Some I'd recommend: The Farseer Saga by Robin Hobb. The First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson (he dedicated one of the books to Glen Cook because the Black Company is the biggest influence for sure). Gloriana or the Unfulfill'd Queen by Michael Moorcock. The Eyes of the Overworld and Cugel's Saga by Jack Vance. The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny.

    So many great fantasy books out there. Usually the biggest Tolkien fans haven't read a lot of these books. If that describes you, give them a shot.

  2. #42
    I know I will be in the minority, but I don't think it's worth it.

    No joke, while I haven't ever been able to manage to read the works of Tolkine, was fully able to recite, word for word, most of the script of the movies, simply because over 20 years of fantasy gaming had given me a fully comprehensive knowledge of the series.

    I could not manage to read the series. It was simply too involved, and that from a total lore junkie. There isn't anything hidden in it's text that would be new to a veteran of the genre. If you have a basic knowledge of generic fantasy, reading Tolikine's work I find to be extraneous.

    Read Zelazny's Amber series instead *shameless plug* It really is that good.
    Quote Originally Posted by xxAkirhaxx View Post
    Blizzard is a conglomerate that through lower sub numbers has raised revenue. They're not stupid, they're just not catering to you.
    Yes yes, I know, the sky just bonked you on the head, casuals are taking over the government, and some baddie just got a raid drop... I think you'll live.

    http://darisdroppings.wordpress.com

  3. #43
    The Lightbringer
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElAmigo View Post
    Could you care to elaborate?
    The word choice, the sentence structures, and the pacing are all the work of what is obviously a very poor amateur. That's fine given the author's age, but the book was hyped way too much for what it was, which was largely a retelling of A New Hope in a fantasy setting.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    Some I'd recommend: The Farseer Saga by Robin Hobb. The First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson (he dedicated one of the books to Glen Cook because the Black Company is the biggest influence for sure). Gloriana or the Unfulfill'd Queen by Michael Moorcock. The Eyes of the Overworld and Cugel's Saga by Jack Vance. The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny.

    So many great fantasy books out there. Usually the biggest Tolkien fans haven't read a lot of these books. If that describes you, give them a shot.
    OMG another Amber fan! Amber for life!
    Quote Originally Posted by xxAkirhaxx View Post
    Blizzard is a conglomerate that through lower sub numbers has raised revenue. They're not stupid, they're just not catering to you.
    Yes yes, I know, the sky just bonked you on the head, casuals are taking over the government, and some baddie just got a raid drop... I think you'll live.

    http://darisdroppings.wordpress.com

  5. #45
    The Lightbringer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dariela View Post
    I know I will be in the minority, but I don't think it's worth it.

    No joke, while I haven't ever been able to manage to read the works of Tolkine, was fully able to recite, word for word, most of the script of the movies, simply because over 20 years of fantasy gaming had given me a fully comprehensive knowledge of the series.

    I could not manage to read the series. It was simply too involved, and that from a total lore junkie. There isn't anything hidden in it's text that would be new to a veteran of the genre. If you have a basic knowledge of generic fantasy, reading Tolikine's work I find to be extraneous.

    Read Zelazny's Amber series instead *shameless plug* It really is that good.
    The Chronicles of Amber is pretty much mandatory fantasy reading. It's so good.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    The Chronicles of Amber is pretty much mandatory fantasy reading. It's so good.
    OMG I really don't want to derail the thread, I think it to be informative, but the Zelazny Amber serires, all 10 of them, is absolutely required reading.

    I've read them all well over 10 times each, and listened to them in undabridged audio 3 or 4 times over.
    They really are that good. I can't recommend them enough.

    Edit: It's so bloody good, that no lie, I've been listening to the Merlin saga again as I've been drifting off to sleep. There is no better fantasy series. I would speak its virtues till the end of my days.
    Last edited by Dariela; 2011-09-10 at 04:54 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by xxAkirhaxx View Post
    Blizzard is a conglomerate that through lower sub numbers has raised revenue. They're not stupid, they're just not catering to you.
    Yes yes, I know, the sky just bonked you on the head, casuals are taking over the government, and some baddie just got a raid drop... I think you'll live.

    http://darisdroppings.wordpress.com

  7. #47
    Mechagnome Proxeneta's Avatar
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    There is no debate, buy the books and hail king Tolkien, they are the best books ever written... period

    edit: also buy The Hobbit, very very nice aswell

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Frontenac View Post
    I agree with FengHouzi. Read the Hobbit first. It is a little bit more childish, but you'll understand better the rest of the story. The books have much more story than the movies. You'll see it's a long journey just to go from Hobbiton to Bree. You'll meet much more characters and see much less Arwen...
    why would i want to see less Arwen.

  9. #49
    There is a lot of elitism in this thread. How about read them and form your own opinion. Reading a book is never a waste of time, even if you end up not liking it.

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    Eragon is, hands down, the worst book I've ever read. I found it to be absolutely laughable. A farce. A mockery of a fantasy book. The most poorly written drivel of all time.
    Eragon may have not been the greatest fantasy book ever written, but it was far from the worst (see night of the dragon, or most other commissioned game lore books). Sure it was cliche, but at least it was better than twilight and it got kids to read more, just like HP did.
    Anything that can get the kids of today interested enough to read it has my respect. I may not like it, but it has my respect. Also, the books in the series got progressively better. You realize he wrote the fist book when he was like 14 right?

  11. #51
    Another series, although admitedly in the Young Adult section and rather simple, is the trillogy by Jane Yollen, Dragon's Bood, Heart's Blood, and A Sending of Dragons.

    While meant for younger people, it was still one of my first introductions to the fantasy genre so many, many years ago. While it may not hold anything new to a veteran, it still has a soft spot in my heart.

    Edit: She has another series that had me fully captivated for a while, the first book was named "Sister Light, Sister Dark" and held me breathless page after page. If the series had come out in a more stable time in my life, I may have managed to finish it. Jane Yollen is one of those underrated names in fantasy fiction. I can whole-heartedly recommend both of those series.
    Last edited by Dariela; 2011-09-10 at 05:07 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by xxAkirhaxx View Post
    Blizzard is a conglomerate that through lower sub numbers has raised revenue. They're not stupid, they're just not catering to you.
    Yes yes, I know, the sky just bonked you on the head, casuals are taking over the government, and some baddie just got a raid drop... I think you'll live.

    http://darisdroppings.wordpress.com

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    Some I'd recommend: The Farseer Saga by Robin Hobb. The First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson (he dedicated one of the books to Glen Cook because the Black Company is the biggest influence for sure). Gloriana or the Unfulfill'd Queen by Michael Moorcock. The Eyes of the Overworld and Cugel's Saga by Jack Vance. The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny.
    Read all of them except Gloriana (I tried it, couldn't get into it. Too Zebra-Romantic for me). I just got Abercrombie's The Heroes last week and plan to read it after I finish reading through the whole Wheel of Time series. I was up to book 3 when Robert Jordan died so i stopped thinking the series would never be completed and only recently found out Sanderson was completing the series so I picked them back up.

    I've been reading Fantasy since I was about 8 (36 now) and got The Chronicles of Narnia as a Christmas present. Voyage of the Dawn Treader got me hooked and I've been going through at least a book every couple of days ever since with most of it being fantasy.

    And The Chronicles of Amber are where my daughter got her name. My wife saw me reading one of the books and decided she liked the name. She thought the books were about a girl named Amber

    While meant for younger people, it was still one of my first introductions to the fantasy genre so many, many years ago.
    I've got the same thing with The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley. I've read it about once a year since '85 and it's still one of my most beloved books.
    Last edited by Ecwfrk; 2011-09-10 at 05:20 AM.

  13. #53
    Mechagnome Galdur's Avatar
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    Defo worth a read theres many things in the books that they left out of the movies that helps some things make more sense.
    Actually if you got time read Silmarilion -Hobbit - and then the trilogy in this order preferably.

  14. #54
    Brewmaster Disenchanted's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jero View Post
    There is a lot of elitism in this thread. How about read them and form your own opinion. Reading a book is never a waste of time, even if you end up not liking it.
    This.

    Look. I won't lie. I actually found the vast majority of LOTR (I had a single volume, all three books in one) extremely tedious to read. If you can say something in 10 words, why not 50 pages? That's how Tolkien's writing style feels.

    I also endorsed reading it even if you've seen the movies on page 1 of this thread.

    Why? Because as tedious as it can be at times; as unnecessarily flowery the language gets; as long winded as Tolkien can be; as much as he relies on tons of Deus Ex Machina... it's STILL a fulfilling read. When I was done, I was glad I had stuck it out. Will I ever read it again? Not likely, or at least only parts of it. But I do not regret reading it.

    Or, as I told my daughter, "If you can read Tolkien, you can read anything."

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    The difference with Harry Potter is that J K Rowling is a talented author. J R R Tolkien was a linguist. He wasn't a writer, and it shows. The writing style in LotR is dull as hell, very textbook-esque. Every single plot conflict is solved through a deus ex machina. The characters are all one dimensional cardboard cutouts with absolutely zero character development. It's exceedingly poorly written.
    Ahh but someone out there liked Tolkien. The books got a second glance some many years after they were written and it inspired sort of a cult following of people who loved this new type of work -- fantasy!

    Some of those people who were inspired later went on to create TSR's Dungeons and Dragons, which later inspired many books, early computer games, console games, more books, and MMO's!

    Early creations shouldn't be so easily pushed aside. Think of something around you and how it first started .. a car, a mainframe, a home computer, a lawnmover, a washing machine .. the first time one came out was clunky as hell. But without someones early vision (as well as supporters who say "I think this person has something there!"), we wouldn't have the newer versions we enjoy today.

  16. #56
    These books fueled my imagination as a kid and i have stayed in that "realm" of fiction ever since, am 40 now.

    The books are a treasure. As everyone says, read the Hobbit first, its more of a childrens book but it does set the scene. I get the feeling the first few chapters of the lord of the rings was also written to be a childrens book, but after the birthday event Tolkien decided to make it much more serious.

    I would like to reread it but at the moment I only have the huge collectors edition with all the books inside, its kinda hard to read since its so bulky and heavy (i like to read laying down on the couch). I must go buy some paperbacks.

  17. #57
    LOTR books are great, but i do recommend reading the hobbit and the silmarillion first, so you have a better idea of middle earth and the pre-story as a whole.
    Be aware that the silmarillion can be a huge pain when reading it the first time though.

    Other book series in this genre that are nice are the Wheel of Time series and farseer saga.
    The warcraft books are a nice read also, despite what many say (discard the witty comments, most people who say knaak is bad haven't even read one of his books).
    Currently playing MMO's: WoW --- Played MMO's before: Wildstar, Tibia, Meridian59, ultima Online, EQ, Rift, Lotro, GW2, AOC, WHO, EQ2, SW:TOR, ESO

  18. #58
    Herald of the Titans ElAmigo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    The word choice, the sentence structures, and the pacing are all the work of what is obviously a very poor amateur. That's fine given the author's age, but the book was hyped way too much for what it was, which was largely a retelling of A New Hope in a fantasy setting.
    Ah, ok. Is your criticism aimed only at the first installment of the series or to the series as a whole?
    "Didn't we have some fun...though? Remember when the platform was sliding into the fire pit and I said 'Goodbye' and you were like 'No way' and then I was all 'We pretended we were going to murder you'......that was great"

  19. #59
    Fluffy Kitten Lokann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilkforCalde View Post
    Eragon is, hands down, the worst book I've ever read. I found it to be absolutely laughable. A farce. A mockery of a fantasy book. The most poorly written drivel of all time.
    Dunno, I thought Eragon (as in the very first book) was sort of okay, in a turn-off-your-brain-and-go-with-the-flow way. Eldest and Brisingr however were rather bad.

    I'd recommend anything by Terry Pratchett BTW, sure it's comic fantasy but it can be very deep indeed (see Reaper Man, Hogfather, Thud...).



  20. #60
    Warchief Knight Gil's Avatar
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    I'd say it's worth it. I'm reading them atm and just finished the two towers yesterday. Still have to read the return of the king

    But god, some parts are really tedious. All that description of the travelling and the zones, etc.

    The book and the film are also slightly different. There are things that seem to make more sense in the movie, and there are things that seem to make more sense in the book. If you read them you'll figure it out.

    Anyway, I'd say the best answer to the thread is:
    There is a lot of elitism in this thread. How about read them and form your own opinion. Reading a book is never a waste of time, even if you end up not liking it.

    Anyway, concerning what I've said about things not making sense (Spoiler alert):

    How come in the movie sam actually turns back all the way down from the stairs to cirith ungol? The hobbits knew gollum was evil, so why did frodo believe him? Then in the book, there's a ridiculous discription about how gollum's cousin, brother, whatever, found the ring. About how he emerged from the river covered in herbs. What the hell? There's no way Gandalf could know that because gollum, hell, killed the guy and so the guy would never be able to tell what happened in the river.
    Last edited by Knight Gil; 2011-09-10 at 12:05 PM.

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