View Poll Results: Worth reading the books if you have seen the films?

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  • Yes

    81 86.17%
  • No

    13 13.83%
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  1. #1
    Stood in the Fire
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    [Books] TLOTR Worth reading if you have seen the film?

    I'm debating whether or not I should read them,I've heard they are amazing but I don't know if ill find them boring since I've already seen the movies :S

  2. #2
    Stood in the Fire Zkeya's Avatar
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    Even if you've seen the movies, reading the book is a whole different thing. There are many things mentioned in the books that didn't appear on screen.
    You may find them a bit boring if you imagine all the characters and events they way they were depicted on the movies. "Forget" the movies and read the books they you'd read a book you knew nothing about!

  3. #3
    Yes. It's absolutely worth reading.

    But be prepared for a real read. The Fellowship of the Rings especially can be a bit of a grind. Overall, it's still a great book.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Disenchanted View Post
    But be prepared for a real read. The Fellowship of the Rings especially can be a bit of a grind. Overall, it's still a great book.
    Exactly what I was going to say. They are amazing books, but there is also a lot of information and stroytelling in it that isn't very action filled especially in Fellowship.

  5. #5
    I am reading them right now. I am on the Return of the King. The two towers was the longest read of my life, but the third book is much better. I would recommend starting with the Hobbit, that way you start from the true beginning.

  6. #6
    Wow, I didn't even know it was still possible to have not read the books... Thanks for proving me wrong.
    Last edited by Xyanide; 2011-09-07 at 04:41 PM.

  7. #7
    The Insane det's Avatar
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    You might hate the books if you loved the films. But the books are richer and expand further on everything. They are however also a bit more "old fashioned". Nothing to lose if you borrow them from a library and give it a spin....
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  8. #8
    The books are so rich in detailed history and lore. I definitely recommend reading them. They can get a little dry, but you definitely should give them a chance.

  9. #9
    I agree with FengHouzi. Read the Hobbit first. It is a little bit more childish, but you'll understand better the rest of the story. The books have much more story than the movies. You'll see it's a long journey just to go from Hobbiton to Bree. You'll meet much more characters and see much less Arwen...

  10. #10
    honestly they are much much better than the movies. It is among the best books I have ever read. While I thought the movies were excellent adaptations, the books are better. I was fortunate to read the books before the movies were released; don't know how the images from the movie would have impacted the enjoyment. Alan Lee's art influenced my images of the story more than anything.

  11. #11
    Epic! Kisuro's Avatar
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    A good book is always worth reading.
    They changed some stuff in the movies, and despite them being long, still ended up cutting a lot. Besides, the books are a classic. Go ahead, read them.

  12. #12
    Mechagnome
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    Read the books, they are much better than the films.
    Personally I don't find them to be as enjoyable as the style Tolkien writes with in LotR is rather drawn out and broad (the styles used in the Hobbit and Silmarillion are both far better). Still, read them. Just remember that it'll be almost a hundred pages or so in book one before anything really happens.

  13. #13
    The movies change, omit, and just generally get random things wrong. Don't get me wrong, I love the movies to death, they're my favorite movies. I still can't help but facepalm every time I watch Return of the King due to how many things are just completely wrong.

    If you ever want to truly understand the story you must read the books.
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  14. #14
    Bloodsail Admiral Waervyn's Avatar
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    Before the movies came out I started on Fellowship of the ring, but didn't make it through,. Respect for Tolkien and his imagination, but I really didn't like his writing style.

  15. #15
    The Lightbringer
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    I'm a huge fantasy book reader. I loathe those books. They are tedious, dry, boring... avoid at all costs. If you want a good fantasy book, read The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie or the Farseer Saga by Robin Hobb.

  16. #16
    Fluffy Kitten Badpaladin's Avatar
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    They're a definite must. Almost everything you know about fantasy was created with those books, and although the movies do them justice there's so much more that they don't bother covering. Tolkein get get carried away with a few things, and the last couple of chapters of TRotK can get long-winded, but you can't miss it.
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  17. #17
    While the books are indeed good, they are written in a very oldfashioned way, and are quite hard to read. You need to actually pay attention while reading to not miss stuff. I would not recommend reading the books if you don't usually read books, as you will most certainly find them extremely boring and grindy
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  18. #18
    The Lightbringer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badpaladin View Post
    They're a definite must. Almost everything you know about fantasy was created with those books, and although the movies do them justice there's so much more that they don't bother covering. Tolkein get get carried away with a few things, and the last couple of chapters of TRotK can get long-winded, but you can't miss it.
    I disagree. Most modern fantasy draws major inspiration from other classic authors like Jack Vance, Michael Moorcock, Roger Zelazny, Robert E Howard, and so on. The fantasy authors I would point to as having the most obvious Tolkien inspirations such as Terry Brooks and David Eddings are the fantasy authors that I consider to be bottom of the barrel. My current favorite fantasy series is The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson and the most obvious inspiration for his series is Glen Cook's The Black Company, which is already a classic in its own rights. Michael Moorcock wrote a fantastic essay about the extremely negative impact Tolkien had on the fantasy genre (which definitely existed long before Tolkien):

    http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=953

    Some great classic fantasy novels:

    Lyonesse by Jack Vance
    The Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny
    Almost anything by Michael Moorcock but his Elric novels are hugely influential on action based fantasy so that might be a good point to start.
    And of course, no one can ever forget the absolutely massive influence that Titus Groan by Mervyn Peake has had on the genre.

    It's something of a constantly repeated myth that Tolkien is the most important development for the fantasy genre but all he did was popularize and rework myths. He didn't innovate at all. It's the kind of constantly repeated myth such as "alcohol destroys brain cells" that is absolutely false, but people have said it so much that everyone believes it to be true.

  19. #19
    Worth reading, since they were very well written. They will include far more than what you can simply watch in the movies, from history, to thoughts and emotions, to details that a movie director just can't capture on film, no matter how good they are.

    Same with Harry Potter .. IMO the books and all their detail were better than the movies. There are many parts from the books that were not included in the final movies, simply because they would all be 3 hour movies (except the first movie though, I think that was pretty much spot on, and the book was short).

  20. #20
    One you push past Tom Bombadil ( I can't even spell his name) it becomes much easier.
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