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  1. #1

    [books] looking for sci-fi new book

    Can you guys recommend me a good book. I would like a sci-fi new (2000s) book.

  2. #2
    Old God apepi's Avatar
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    Read the Expanse series, it is space opera, and has more than one point of view. the setting is a mid range future where humanity has colonized much of the solar system, Moons, Asteroids, planets and etc, and as they do the colonies strain more and more under dependence of the inner planets(Earth and Mars).

    They are actually going to be trying to make the series into a television series. The new book actually came out this month. Just don't buy it on amazon, the publisher and amazon are not at the best terms right now.
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    Epic! Mapathy's Avatar
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    Your really limiting yourself if you stick to new stuff, there are some truly amazing sci-fi books from older decades.

  4. #4
    Old God apepi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pvt Hudson View Post
    Your really limiting yourself if you stick to new stuff, there are some truly amazing sci-fi books from older decades.
    Maybe he has read all the old ones?
    Time...line? Time isn't made out of lines. It is made out of circles. That is why clocks are round. ~ Caboose

  5. #5
    looks pretty good and also had a great reception. It is probably what i was looking for. Thank you apepi!

  6. #6
    What kind of sci-fi do you like? Hard sci-fi, space opera, speculative, dystopian/cyberpunk?

    I've been on a Charles Stross kick for the better part of this year, loving everything I've read. Super smart, funny, insightful stuff. I just started Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds as a change of pace from Stross' speculative stuff to a sprawling space opera theme. So far so good. A little rote around the edges, but it's his first novel, he's since gone on to a highly acclaimed and award-winning career.
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  7. #7
    Bloodsail Admiral Devorawn's Avatar
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    How Sci-fi is Sci-fi to you?

    If you don't mind if you don't mind the stuff that's set during modern times then check out Scott Sigler.

    The synopsis for my favourite novel of his, EarthCore, is as follows:

    "Deep below a desolate Utah mountain lies the largest platinum deposit ever discovered. A billion-dollar find, it waits for any company that can drill a world’s record, three-mile-deep mine shaft. EarthCore is the company with the technology, the resources and the guts to go after the mother lode. Young executive Connell Kirkland is the company’s driving force, pushing himself and those around him to uncover the massive treasure.
    But at three miles below the surface, where the rocks are so hot they burn bare skin, something has been waiting for centuries. Waiting … and guarding. Kirkland and EarthCore are about to find out firsthand why this treasure has never been unearthed."

    I think he does some more futuristic books as well, but I'm less familiar with those.
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  8. #8
    Maybe "windwalkers" or "la horde du contrevent" in french. Absolutely awsome book !

  9. #9
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    This is 1989 but if you haven't read it, you're missing out:

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  10. #10
    Epic! Skizzit's Avatar
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    One of my favorite Sci-fi series ever is the Otherland series by Tad Williams, an author who is probably more known for his fantasy work. It's a semi cyberpunk series about a world-wide secret society of the richest and most powerful people who combine their resources to create the most advanced VR system ever. A system so advanced that the group end goal is to upload their consciousness and live forever in virtual worlds of their own creation. The series follows a group of characters from all walks of life who for one reason or another find their way into this secret VR network and get stuck. They have to travel from one virtual world to the next in order to try and find a way to escape and find out the dirty secrets of this creation and the people behind it.

    The thing I love most about the series is all the various virtual worlds the group travels through. From worlds that are alternate interpretations of classic literature like Alice and Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, and War of the Worlds to one based on Egyptian mythology or one seemingly based on Honey I Shrunk the Kids and one where the entire world is covered in one, giant, billion-roomed house.

    It is a long series and the first book does start pretty slowly as it sets up the world and all the many characters, but it is totally worth it. The first book of the series is called City of Golden Shadow.

  11. #11
    try Blindsight. it's a great read, a bit further towards the hard end of the sci-fi spectrum than most mainstream sci-fi which might put some people off but it's well worth a read. and best of all the author chose to give it away free on his own website (read it on the page or download the ebook links at the top)



    the story is about a group of people sent on a first contact mission after Earth is scanned by alien probes and what may be their ship is detected in deep space. the crew have a variety of neurological modifications to improve their function (which is very common, much of humanity have been forced to resort to such measure in order to compete) and led by a sciencey version of a vampire (prehistoric offshoot of neathandral man which went extinct due to the rise of human civilisation but science managed to bring them back and 'tame' them) which is a lot more interesting than you'd imagine it would be
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  12. #12
    Brewmaster rawhammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skizzit View Post
    One of my favorite Sci-fi series ever is the Otherland series by Tad Williams, an author who is probably more known for his fantasy work. It's a semi cyberpunk series about a world-wide secret society of the richest and most powerful people who combine their resources to create the most advanced VR system ever. A system so advanced that the group end goal is to upload their consciousness and live forever in virtual worlds of their own creation. The series follows a group of characters from all walks of life who for one reason or another find their way into this secret VR network and get stuck. They have to travel from one virtual world to the next in order to try and find a way to escape and find out the dirty secrets of this creation and the people behind it.

    The thing I love most about the series is all the various virtual worlds the group travels through. From worlds that are alternate interpretations of classic literature like Alice and Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, and War of the Worlds to one based on Egyptian mythology or one seemingly based on Honey I Shrunk the Kids and one where the entire world is covered in one, giant, billion-roomed house.

    It is a long series and the first book does start pretty slowly as it sets up the world and all the many characters, but it is totally worth it. The first book of the series is called City of Golden Shadow.
    Indeed a great series.

    If you like space opera then have you considered the Honor Harrington novels?
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  13. #13
    The The Quiet War by Paul J. McAuley or more exactly the short novels about the Quiet War universe (technical the solar system)

    Its hard SF, that for the most time follow the laws of physics, but have things like genetic designed vacum beasts, animals who can live on a surface of a moon. The the outer planets (moon) colonies want liberty from earth but get compliantly crushed in the quiet war and in the short novels tell the story's about different individuals who try to go on after the war, like scrapping workers who recycle warships, sleeper agent who is now obsolete then it is peace, Bounty Hunter who hunt still free biological war "monsters" etc

    It might sound like the classic US independent recycled in space but Earth won big time, and are not totally ruthless (after they won) Very detailed description of how the colony works and operating and what technology they use.
    Last edited by a77; 2014-06-19 at 06:46 PM.

  14. #14
    The Insane Reeve's Avatar
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    This is from 1992, but I very highly recommend Snow Crash:



    It's one of the better books I've ever read. It should be borne in mind that this was written during the early days of the Internet.
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  15. #15
    don't know about the original poster but I've certainly added a few books to my wishlist from this thread
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  16. #16
    If you want 'hard' sci-fi, try Greg Bear. Start with Eon and work your way forward, although his stuff is older.

    If you want cyberpunk sci-fi, try the Takeshi Kovacs novels (first one is Altered Carbon) by Richard K Morgan.

    If you want comedy sci-fi, and haven't read the Opus that is Hitchhikers, you are doing something wrong.

    If you want just good Sci-Fi, read Iain M Banks. Start with 'A Player of Games' as that is the best introduction to the 'Culture'.
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  17. #17
    You cannot go wrong with any of Iain M. Banks culture series of books (start with Consider Phlebas, to this day the best book i've ever read).
    I'll also echo another poster and recommend Alastair Reynold's revalation space universe, very good books.
    Lastly I just reread the Polity series by Neal Asher...awesome series

  18. #18
    On Iain M. Banks;

    The Culture novels (loosely a series) deal with galactic civilisations on a massive scale with hyper-advanced technology that utilises some well disguised and not-impossible space magic (think Star Trek on steroids). I wouldn't recommend starting with any of the latest books (Matter, Surface Details, The Hydrogen Sonata) as I felt they needed prior knowledge of the universe to fully appreciate.

    Use of Weapons is pretty tough to get through, to quote wikipedia;
    The book is made up of two narrative streams, interwoven in alternating chapters. The numbers of the chapters indicate which stream they belong to: one stream is numbered forward in words (One, Two ...), while the other is numbered in reverse with Roman numerals (XIII, XII ...). The story told by the former moves forward chronologically (as the numbers suggest) and tells a self-contained story, while in the latter is written in reverse chronology with each chapter successively earlier in Zakalwe's life.[2] Further complicating this structure is a prologue and epilogue set shortly after the events of the main narrative, and many flashbacks within the chapters.
    Inversions is odd, it makes a few nods towards connections with the Culture but feels more like a low-fantasy story.

    Against a Dark Background is a stand-alone novel possibly in the same universe and has a more cyber-punk feel with the action limited to a single solar system.

    The Algebraist is another stand-alone definitely in a seperate continuity with a harder sci-fi edge (notably speed is restricted to sub-light with inter-stellar travel handled by wormholes).

    Feersum Enjinn is weird. Good but weird.

  19. #19
    get ben bova books , he did a series about colonizing planets , the first one is about Mars and the trials the people face trying to live there.

  20. #20
    Ancillary Justice. An absolutely spectacular debut novel (not just my opinion, it's been piling up the awards this season).

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