1. #1

    Xi to Stress China’s ‘Responsible’ Global Role in Davos

    BEIJING—China’s government said its leader would signal at a global forum next week that Beijing supports multilateralism and is a responsible global power, as the incoming Trump administration strikes a different tone.

    President Xi Jinping will emphasize China’s support for global cooperation and free trade at a keynote speech on Tuesday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and in an address to the United Nations in Geneva the next day, the Foreign Ministry said on Wednesday. He will be the first Chinese head of state to attend the Davos forum.

    Mr. Xi will assert that China is a “responsible country” and will “contribute China’s wisdom” in his meetings with political, economic and academic leaders and the media, said Vice Minister Li Baodong. Mr. Xi also will address the bigger questions of “where mankind came from, where we are and where we’re going.”

    The divisive U.S. election and President-elect Donald’s Trump’s “America First” approach presents China with a chance to extend its global sway and present itself as a force for stability.

    Mr. Trump, who will be inaugurated on Jan. 20, has said he will pull the U.S. out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership global trade group that was a cornerstone of the Obama administration’s goals in Asia. Mr. Trump also has said he will renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, build a wall on Mexico’s border, curb Muslim immigration and impose tariffs on some foreign nations, including China, and U.S. domestic producers with operations abroad.

    Mr. Trump has singled out China for scorn, saying it fabricated global warming for its economic benefit, flouted the rules of free trade and unfairly devalued its currency to help boost exports. In fact, China’s central bank in recent months has often done the opposite, intervening to prop up the yuan.

    “Before when China said it’s a responsible power, everyone thought ‘Who are you kidding,’” said National University of Singapore professor Huang Jing. “China wants to use Davos as an established platform to demonstrate that it will play a ‘positive’ role in peace and stability.”

    “It’s quite ironic that the U.S. established this global order and now China is acting as its defender,” he added.


    Chinese President Xi Jinping, speaking last week in Beijing, will attend the World Economic Forum in Davos next week. PHOTO: LI TAO/XINHUA VIA ZUMA WIRE

    Still, China has come under growing criticism for protectionist policies and unfair trading practices. During the first 11 months of 2016, 16 countries and regions launched 41 investigations over $6.8 billion in steel products imported from China, according to Chinese official figures.

    Mr. Li defended China’s trade stance on Wednesday. “Some people may accuse China of trade protectionism,” he said. “These are unjustified. We have always been very open and inclusive in this area.”

    China has taken advantage of unexpected global events before to burnish its global image. In 2001 it was among the first countries to express strong support for the U.S. after Sept. 11 and offer to share intelligence, which helped soften President George W. Bush’s wariness of Beijing. And in 2009 its $578 billion stimulus program helped calm markets in the wake of the global financial crisis.

    But China’s image has suffered from its sometimes blunt foreign policy statements and territorial disputes in the South China Seas. China’s soft power, the use of non-military persuasion to achieve foreign policy objectives, rated 28 in the 2016 Soft Power 30 index, compared with the No. 1-rated U.S.

    “Trump’s election is a political earthquake and China is seizing the opportunity to turn around its image,” Mr. Huang said. To further improve its soft power, however, China needs to ease tension over its trade policies, territorial disputes and ensure that its massive Silk Road infrastructure initiative benefit other countries and aren’t just promoting China-centric interests, he added.

    The international community needs to see “whether they play fair or just talk the talk,” Mr. Huang said.
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/xi-to-st...vos-1484123560

    I wonder if making America great again includes presenting China with real opportunities to expand its influence and encroach upon our "territory" in the global order.

  2. #2
    Yeah they are definitely seeing this as a chance to dominate the world’s economy. Export to the US is now only 20% of China’s total export. At around 40B a month, still a large sum, but dwarfed by China’s domestic consumption which was 2.996 trillion in 2011, and projected to hit 67 trillion in 2025. The more telling number is that 2.996 trillion consumption in 2011 is only 28% of their GDP. In the same year, US domestic consumption was 10.7 trillion. However, that was 2/3 of the US GDP in 2011 which was 15.1 trillion.

    Corrected the consumption. China 2011 GDP (PPP) is 10.7 trillion.
    Last edited by Rasulis; 2017-01-11 at 06:10 PM.

  3. #3
    The Insane PC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    California
    Posts
    15,684
    Will he champion free expression in his home region? I would be much more impressed by that.

  4. #4
    Awaited in Valhalla
    Annoying's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Socorro, NM, USA
    Posts
    10,662
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    Yeah they are definitely seeing this as a chance to dominate the world’s economy. Export to the US is now only 20% of China’s total export. At around 40B a month, still a large sum, but dwarfed by China’s domestic consumption which was 11.7 trillion in 2011, and projected to hit 67 trillion in 2020. The more telling number is that 11.7 trillion consumption in 2011 is only 28% of their GDP. In the same year, US domestic consumption was 10.7 trillion. However, that was 2/3 of the US GDP in 2011 which was 15.1 trillion.
    China's GDP in 2011 was 7.322 trillion. 11.7 trillion isn't 28% of 7.322 trillion.

    World bank has China's domestic consumption at 37% of GDP in 2015 -- and falling, meaning (with a 9.96 trillion GDP) that their consumption was ~3.69 trillion.

    I have no clue where you got those numbers from.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by PrimaryColor View Post
    Will he champion free expression in his home region? I would be much more impressed by that.
    I am not sure that most Chinese really care that much for freedom of expression. Except for Hong Kong.

  6. #6
    All saber rattling aside Trump becoming president is the greatest thing to happen to China, America has decided to take a backseat and China is more than happy to fill the void.

  7. #7
    The Insane PC2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    California
    Posts
    15,684
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    I am not sure that most Chinese really care that much for freedom of expression. Expect for Hong Kong.
    Xi says China is a "responsible country" with "ancient wisdom". If they are not allowed to criticize their government and debate all ideas then I'm not so convinced of their wisdom.

  8. #8
    Merely a Setback Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    29,239
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    I am not sure that most Chinese really care that much for freedom of expression. Except for Hong Kong.
    And Tibet...
    Vocatus atque non vocatus, deus aderit.

  9. #9
    Deleted
    Well, China is going to become the leading power. Even trump cant change that.

    I would be more happy about that idea if china was a democratic society.

  10. #10
    I'm sure it would be easier to believe this speech if China wasn't bullying everyone of his neighbours into territorial disputes that sometimes reach nearly comical levels.
    It's pretty telling that even Vietnam (the country which was supported by China and had millions of death due to USA war on their soil not that long ago) is actually starting to warm to USA against China.

  11. #11
    Merely a Setback Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    29,239
    Quote Originally Posted by rym View Post
    Well, China is going to become the leading power. Even trump cant change that.

    I would be more happy about that idea if china was a democratic society.
    From their perspective, as a Technocratic pseudo-communist/capitalist society. Democracy gets you Trump and Putin.

    The problem with Democracy, is we forgot the caveat:
    "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." - Thomas Jefferson
    Vocatus atque non vocatus, deus aderit.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Connal View Post
    And Tibet...
    And Xinjiang...

    Shall we keep this going?

  13. #13
    I am Murloc! Ravenblade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Germany - Thuringia
    Posts
    5,053
    Quote Originally Posted by rym View Post
    Well, China is going to become the leading power. Even trump cant change that.

    I would be more happy about that idea if china was a democratic society.
    Not unless he can build a wall around them, better than anyone before them, including the Chinese. It will also be cheap. It will also have a single door.
    WoW: Crowcloak (Druid) & Neesheya (Paladin) @ Sylvanas EU (/ˈkaZHo͞oəl/) | GW2: Siqqa (Asura Engineer) @ Piken Square EU
    If builders built houses the way programmers built programs,the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization. - Weinberg's 2nd law

    He seeks them here, he seeks them there, he seeks those lupins everywhere!


  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Atethecat View Post
    And Xinjiang...

    Shall we keep this going?
    I would be happier with a free Tibet, but that is just not going to happen. The problem with Xinjiang has more to do with the separatist movement than freedom of expression. I doubt that the ethnic Uyghur Muslim will be any more free than the current Chinese government if they have their own government.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Akka View Post
    I'm sure it would be easier to believe this speech if China wasn't bullying everyone of his neighbours into territorial disputes that sometimes reach nearly comical levels.
    It's pretty telling that even Vietnam (the country which was supported by China and had millions of death due to USA war on their soil not that long ago) is actually starting to warm to USA against China.
    I think regardless of exactly what parts they are true to their word on, this sort of thing makes it quite clear they recognize a big opportunity and intend to take advantage of it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •