1. #6961
    Merely a Setback Breccia's Avatar
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    BusinessInsider points out a story that I'm pretty sure we missed, but to be fair, it's been kind of a busy month. A lot of this shit is running together.

    The special counsel Robert Mueller obtained a new search warrant against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort less than a month ago, according to court documents filed on Thursday.

    Mueller's office made the revelation in an opposition it filed to Manafort's recent motion to compel the government to turn over un-redacted versions of search and seizure warrants it had obtained against him. Mueller's office said that after Manafort first raised the issue, the US government gave the defense copies of six affidavits — three of them had no redactions, and the other three had minimal redactions.

    Per the court filing, the special counsel also obtained a new search warrant in the Manafort case less than one month ago, on March 9. It turned over a redacted copy of the warrant to the defense on Wednesday.

    But Mueller's office also made another notable disclosure.

    Four out of the seven affidavits that have been produced for the defense were redacted because they contained information regarding "ongoing investigations that are not the subject of the current prosecutions involving Manafort." The most recent warrant has more "substantial redactions" than the other three.
    I'm going to pause here while you re-read that.

    That's right: not only are these completely new crimes, unrelated to the Ukraine business that Trump's rabid fanbase likes to handwave (I still love that argument, "Manafort was already good and corrupt and a criminal before Trump hired him", it's just so...so...Trump), and that they involve information too valuable to share with the public.

    Let that sink in.

    Manafort has been charged with dozens of counts related to financial crimes and conspiracy against the US. The charges against Manafort so far deal primarily with his lobbying work for pro-Russia interests in Ukraine and former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych. Based on Thursday's court filing, Mueller has found evidence of wrongdoing in the Manafort case that is not limited to his consulting work in Ukraine.

    According to a recently released memo deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein sent Mueller last year, the special counsel is authorized to investigate at least two threads as it relates to Manafort: allegations of criminal activity arising from his work in Ukraine, and allegations that he colluded with Russian officials as Russia was trying to meddle in the 2016 US election.

    The rest of the Rosenstein memo was redacted, and legal experts have suggested it's possible Mueller was authorized to investigate additional allegations against Manafort outside of the collusion inquiry and his Ukraine lobbying.

    The special counsel's office disclosed a partial list of its warrants against Manafort thus far in Thursday's court filing. In addition to searching Manafort's home, bank accounts, email, and hard drive, prosecutors also secured permission to search "information associated with five telephone numbers controlled by AT&T."

    News that Mueller is broadening his focus with respect to Manafort is bolstered by recent reports that prosecutors told Manafort's longtime deputy Rick Gates they didn't need his cooperation against Manafort. Instead, they are reportedly interested in learning more from him about the Trump campaign's contacts with Russians during the 2016 US election.
    Granted, this could still be Manafort doing a bunch of illegal shit on his own. That's possible. But with increasing OH SHIT Mueller just seized three of Manafort's bank accounts. And a storage locker of some note.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The New York Times reports on who they believe the Person A in Manafort's many indictments is. I hate quoting the whole thing, but the NYTimes has a paywall and I don't want to leave anyone unable to see details.

    The man sat at a restaurant table, grasping a glass of white wine. His sandy hair was close cropped, he wore a cardigan sweater and in the afternoon bustle he looked like just another office worker at lunch.

    While seated, the most notable element of his appearance was hardly noticeable; only when he stood to introduce himself did it become clear that he is short, almost childlike, in stature, a characteristic that earned him the nickname “the midget.”

    He spoke flawless English, with only a touch of an accent, was gregarious, and casually brushed aside the main question in this rare interview in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, a year or so ago, saying that of course he was not a Russian spy.

    Yet in Washington these days, the man, Konstantin V. Kilimnik, has turned up in multiple court filings by the special prosecutor, Robert S. Mueller III, who identifies him as Person A. Just this week, for example, a Dutch lawyer was sentenced to a month in prison for lying to the F.B.I. about, among other things, his communications with Person A.

    And last week, Mr. Mueller turned over a card in the investigation into the Trump campaign’s possible collusion with Russia by asserting in a court document that this person “has ties to a Russian intelligence service” and was in contact with a senior member of the campaign, Rick Gates, during the 2016 election.

    “The Federal Bureau of Investigation special agents assisting the Special Counsel’s Office assess that Person A has ties to a Russian intelligence service and had such ties in 2016,” the filing said.

    As Person A, Mr. Kilimnik, a 47-year-old former Russian military interpreter, has appeared now in multiple court filings by the special prosecutor, which suggests that he could become a pivotal figure in the investigation. For about a decade, he worked as an office manager in Kiev for the political consulting business of Mr. Manafort, acting as a go-between and fixer for the American and the Russian-leaning politicians who were its clients.

    The Russian government has denied meddling in the 2016 election and President Trump has denied collusion by members of his campaign staff. But during the years that Mr. Manafort worked in Ukraine, the country was deeply penetrated by Russian intelligence agents. While Mr. Kilimnik continues to deny that he was a Russian agent, it would have been perfectly normal for Moscow to plant someone in the Manafort operation.

    Konstantin Viktorovich Kilimnik was born in eastern Ukraine in the Soviet period. He studied at the Military Institute of the Ministry of Defense in Moscow, and after the Soviet breakup took Russian citizenship, he said in the interview. The institute trains interpreters for the Russian military intelligence agency, formerly known as the G.R.U. and now called the Main Dictatorate.
    Whoops, typo, my bad! Lemme try that again...

    the Main Directorate.

    He worked for a time in Sweden as an interpreter for a Russian company that exported arms, and later in the Moscow office of the International Republican Institute, a Washington-based nonprofit, where former employees said they suspected he was informing on them to the Russian authorities.

    He parted ways with the organization, a former employee of the Moscow office said, after the chief of the F.S.B., the successor agency to the K.G.B., talked in a speech about the private meetings of the institute’s officials.

    They didn’t have evidence, but suspected Mr. Kilimnik had been the source, said the former official, who could not be cited publicly discussing personnel issues.

    In the interview, Mr. Kilimnik said he had been dismissed for having taken work on the side as an interpreter for Mr. Manafort in Ukraine in the early 2000s.

    It is not known whether Mr. Manafort, a longtime consultant to Republican politicians, was aware of the suspicions of the institute’s managers when he hired Mr. Kilimnik in 2005. Mr. Manafort’s business in Ukraine was registered in Mr. Kilimnik’s name.

    Mr. Manafort’s former client President Viktor F. Yanukovych was deposed in 2014, and Mr. Kilimnik said he stopped working for Mr. Manafort that year.

    In August of 2016, Mr. Kilimnik was formally investigated in Ukraine on suspicion of ties to Russian spy agencies, according to documents from Parliament and the Prosecutor General’s Office, but no charges were filed.

    A Ukrainian lawmaker, Volodymyr I. Ariev, who requested the investigation, said Mr. Kilimnik’s background in military intelligence deserved scrutiny.

    He was a student of a military school in Russia,” Mr. Ariev said. “Everybody in the former Soviet Union knows what that means. They produce professional spies.

    In person, though, Mr. Kilimnik has been surprisingly nonchalant about the suspicions swirling around his past and role in the 2016 campaign.

    He said he was never contacted by investigators in Ukraine and called the probe politically motivated. “If there were any truth to me talking to any security service in the world, they would arrest me,” he said, speaking of Ukrainian law enforcement.

    Before the United States election, Mr. Kilimnik said, he and Mr. Manafort had spoken “every couple of months,” at a time when Mr. Manafort served as chairman of the Trump campaign, but he said there was nothing to hide in the calls and meetings. The two mostly discussed Ukrainian politics, not the election, he said: “I was briefing him on Ukraine.”

    The filing last week by the special counsel’s office asserted that Mr. Kilimnik had communicated with Mr. Gates late during the 2016 campaign, and that Mr. Gates was aware of Mr. Kilimnik’s background in Russian intelligence.

    The filing was notable for touching on Mr. Gates’s activities during the campaign. He has pleaded guilty to lying to the F.B.I. and conspiring to defraud the United States for activities related to his work in Ukraine mostly before joining the Trump campaign, and agreed to cooperate with the investigation.

    Mr. Gates’s communications with Mr. Kilimnik were revealed in the sentencing documents of a former lawyer for with the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, Alex van der Zwaan, who pleaded guilty to lying to the F.B.I. about his interactions with Mr. Kilimnik and with Mr. Gates.

    Mr. Kilimnik also played a role in a reported effort by Mr. Manafort to contact a Russian oligarch, Oleg V. Deripaska, during the campaign.

    Mr. Manafort and Mr. Kilimnik had cooperated on an ultimately unsuccessful business venture financed by Mr. Deripaska, known as the Pericles investment fund.

    In July, 2016, while Mr. Manafort was chairman of the Trump campaign, Mr. Manafort emailed Mr. Kilimnik asking him to offer Mr. Deripaska “private briefings” about the campaign in exchange for resolving a multimillion dollar financial dispute related to the business, according to the Washington Post. Mr. Deripaska has said he never received the offer. Mr. Kilimnik, reached by email, declined to comment on this matter and the special counsel’s court filings.

    Mr. Kilimnik has surfaced as a fringe figure in other aspects of the Russian investigation.

    Rinat Akhmetshin, a Russian-American lobbyist who attended a Trump Tower meeting with Donald Trump Jr. in June of 2016 where a Russian lawyer had promised to provide negative information on Hillary Clinton, had also worked in Ukraine with Mr. Kilimnik closely enough to know his nickname among Russian-leaning political operatives in Kiev.

    At the time, about eight years ago, Mr. Akhmetshin was trying to persuade political advisers of Mr. Yanukovych to buy the rights to a book that cast a domestic political opponent in a negative light, and attended meetings with Mr. Kilimnik.

    In the interview last year, Mr. Kilimnik said he divided his time between Kiev, where he worked, and Moscow, where his wife and two daughters lived in the suburb of Khimki.

    In a court filing last year, Mr. Mueller asserted that Mr. Kilimnik was now based in Russia. In email exchanges over the past year, Mr. Kilimnik has declined to say where he is.

    “I do not want to be part of the U.S. political games and I am not,” Mr. Kilimnik wrote in an email last year. “I am simply a random casualty because of my proximity to Paul,” he said, referring to Mr. Manafort.

    Asked in the interview about the allegation of ties to Russian intelligence agencies, Mr. Kilimnik said, “I vehemently deny it.”
    Bolded for emphasis. So much emphasis.

  2. #6962
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Bolded for emphasis. So much emphasis.
    Damn, that's a lot of emphasis. Can you boil it down to something like:


  3. #6963
    Merely a Setback Breccia's Avatar
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    Hey remember when Blackwater bigshot Erik Prince claims he stumbled into a meeting with a close Putin ally by accident?

    Mueller ain't buying it.

    And, supposedly, Nader ratted him out.

  4. #6964
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Hey remember when Blackwater bigshot Erik Prince claims he stumbled into a meeting with a close Putin ally by accident?

    Mueller ain't buying it.

    And, supposedly, Nader ratted him out.
    No honor among dipshits, naturally.

  5. #6965
    Deleted
    Quote Originally Posted by NYC17 View Post
    No honor among dipshits, naturally.
    you'd of thought the pizzagaters would be all over Nader, an actual convicted child molester knocking about the halls of power.

    Erik Prince is a stain on humanity. Mercenaries are really the worst human beings on the planet. But is a powerful man especially when the USA has been privatising violence abroad and domestically. (and his sis is a big player in the Trump squad)

  6. #6966
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    I really feel like the point that he is related to devos' should be stressed here as a likely illegal kickback, especially given her actions so far.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by ctd123 View Post
    (and his sis is a big player in the Trump squad)
    You beat me to it.
    Also, it's you'd've not you'd of. I don't say this to be a dick or anything, I just like doubly contracted words.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudol Von Stroheim View Post
    I do not need to play the role of "holier than thou". I'm above that..

  7. #6967
    Quote Originally Posted by ctd123 View Post
    you'd of thought the pizzagaters would be all over Nader, an actual convicted child molester knocking about the halls of power.

    Erik Prince is a stain on humanity. Mercenaries are really the worst human beings on the planet. But is a powerful man especially when the USA has been privatising violence abroad and domestically. (and his sis is a big player in the Trump squad)
    And of course, she's a big player most likely because of what Prince did/has done for Trump since his campaign began.

  8. #6968
    Merely a Setback cubby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Hey remember when Blackwater bigshot Erik Prince claims he stumbled into a meeting with a close Putin ally by accident?

    Mueller ain't buying it.

    And, supposedly, Nader ratted him out.
    I'm surprised that someone like Erik Prince isn't better at hiding this shit. He runs a multinational assassination security company for the love of god. You would think trade-craft would be part of the job description. Not even good trade-craft, just basics.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Ripster42 View Post
    I really feel like the point that he is related to devos' should be stressed here as a likely illegal kickback, especially given her actions so far.
    Agreed. The backscratching and nepotism know no bounds in this "administration".

  9. #6969
    Merely a Setback Breccia's Avatar
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    Hey remember in 2008 when --

    "Just get to it."

    Fine. Mueller adds another lawyer to his team -- strange, Mueller has no problem finding lawyers, maybe Trump should ask him how he does it -- and one who's run an investigation before. Specifically, the guy who investigated Palin, for firing a law enforcement officer, supposedly without good reason.

    Sound familiar?

    Oh...and this guy, he's a Republican. No handwringing about bias today!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also, Roger Stone joins the list of people telling Trump not to testify.

  10. #6970
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Hey remember in 2008 when --

    "Just get to it."

    Fine. Mueller adds another lawyer to his team -- strange, Mueller has no problem finding lawyers, maybe Trump should ask him how he does it -- and one who's run an investigation before. Specifically, the guy who investigated Palin, for firing a law enforcement officer, supposedly without good reason.

    Sound familiar?

    Oh...and this guy, he's a Republican. No handwringing about bias today!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also, Roger Stone joins the list of people telling Trump not to testify.
    Eh, this is a few days old and he's not joining Mueller's investigation. He's assisting Rosenstein in overseeing Mueller's investigation.

  11. #6971
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Oh...and this guy, he's a Republican. No handwringing about bias today!
    So is Mueller himself. Didn't you get the memo? Anyone who is - or rather could potentially be - against Trump immediately becomes a Democrat, no questions asked.

    Heck, George W. Bush is only like 1 or 2 favorable comparisons to Trump away from becoming, and always having been, a Dem.

  12. #6972
    Merely a Setback Breccia's Avatar
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    Hey remember the time Roger Stone got interviewed by InfoWars (HAHAHAHAHA) and said, on Oct 2, 2016, that a big WikiLeaks release of hacked emails was coming?

    And it turns out, it was?

    Stone has since denied meeting or talking with WikiLeaks, a thief working for Putin. Odd, then, that he seemed to have that kind of insider knowledge to within a couple days.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Bla bla bla Manafort files a motion to suppress bla bla bla third set of indictments against him including collusion bla bla bla "inevitable discovery" bla bla bla burden of proof is very high bla bla bla four of the seven were redacted indicating they are new charges unrelated to the current ones.

  13. #6973
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    Hey remember the time Roger Stone got interviewed by InfoWars (HAHAHAHAHA) and said, on Oct 2, 2016, that a big WikiLeaks release of hacked emails was coming?

    And it turns out, it was?

    Stone has since denied meeting or talking with WikiLeaks, a thief working for Putin. Odd, then, that he seemed to have that kind of insider knowledge to within a couple days.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Bla bla bla Manafort files a motion to suppress bla bla bla third set of indictments against him including collusion bla bla bla "inevitable discovery" bla bla bla burden of proof is very high bla bla bla four of the seven were redacted indicating they are new charges unrelated to the current ones.
    Did you forget the post, I might have missed it, that Manafort has had 7 search warrants issued against him over the last year? You really have to have fucked up if you have had 7 search warrants against you.

  14. #6974
    Quote Originally Posted by Orbitus View Post
    Did you forget the post, I might have missed it, that Manafort has had 7 search warrants issued against him over the last year? You really have to have fucked up if you have had 7 search warrants against you.
    Manafort's defense is basically "hope for a pardon" or "win on a technicality." The judge presiding over one of his cases has already basically started calling out manafort's counsel's frivolous motions (though I don't think there is any penalty for defense counsel making frivolous motions in criminal trials like there is for civil trials).
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudol Von Stroheim View Post
    I do not need to play the role of "holier than thou". I'm above that..

  15. #6975
    Merely a Setback Breccia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripster42 View Post
    Manafort's defense is basically "hope for a pardon" or "win on a technicality."
    This is exactly right.

    While there's surely stuff going on we don't know about due to gag orders, there has yet to be a defense Manafort has publicly tried that was "I didn't do it". It's been "Mueller should never have jurisdiction over that stuff I did".

    And, as we've seen this very week, the judge has once again said "yes he does" the FBI has said "yes he does" and Mueller said "it doesn't matter, I'm coming after you for collusion next, here are some more indictments".

    Can't wait to see Trump's rabid fanbase try to explain the pardon on someone who worked on his campaign and worked with Russia -- even if the two, somehow, aren't connected, it's becoming more and more clear that Trump hired someone entrenched in illegal Russian shit. Pardoning someone who worked so closely with Russia, even if unrelated to his campaign, should be a political death sentence.

  16. #6976
    Quote Originally Posted by Breccia View Post
    This is exactly right.

    While there's surely stuff going on we don't know about due to gag orders, there has yet to be a defense Manafort has publicly tried that was "I didn't do it". It's been "Mueller should never have jurisdiction over that stuff I did".

    And, as we've seen this very week, the judge has once again said "yes he does" the FBI has said "yes he does" and Mueller said "it doesn't matter, I'm coming after you for collusion next, here are some more indictments".

    Can't wait to see Trump's rabid fanbase try to explain the pardon on someone who worked on his campaign and worked with Russia -- even if the two, somehow, aren't connected, it's becoming more and more clear that Trump hired someone entrenched in illegal Russian shit. Pardoning someone who worked so closely with Russia, even if unrelated to his campaign, should be a political death sentence.
    The odd part is that even among Trumpeteers, from what I have seen anyway, there doesn't seem to be a groundswell of support, for Manafort. So pardoning him would be such a blatantly self-interested move it seems like the only thing it could accomplish would be to hurt Trump.

    Not that Trump is ever aware of anything outside his own immediate gratification or interest though.

  17. #6977
    Quote Originally Posted by NYC17 View Post
    The odd part is that even among Trumpeteers, from what I have seen anyway, there doesn't seem to be a groundswell of support, for Manafort. So pardoning him would be such a blatantly self-interested move it seems like the only thing it could accomplish would be to hurt Trump.
    Again, trump doesn't care how it looks. "I could stand on 5th avenue and shoot someone and I wouldn't lose any voters."
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudol Von Stroheim View Post
    I do not need to play the role of "holier than thou". I'm above that..

  18. #6978
    Quote Originally Posted by Ripster42 View Post
    Again, trump doesn't care how it looks. "I could stand on 5th avenue and shoot someone and I wouldn't lose any voters."
    Pretty sure I made that point immediately after what you quoted

  19. #6979
    Quote Originally Posted by NYC17 View Post
    Pretty sure I made that point immediately after what you quoted
    With this?
    Not that Trump is ever aware of anything outside his own immediate gratification or interest though.
    That most assuredly does not say the same thing. One is speaking to the mindless devotion of his followers, the other is speaking to his own narcissism.

  20. #6980
    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas82 View Post
    With this?

    That most assuredly does not say the same thing. One is speaking to the mindless devotion of his followers, the other is speaking to his own narcissism.
    Yes? I mean it's pretty clear. Is playing a game of semantics something fun for you?

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