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  1. #21
    Honestly, as long as I can go on the internet quickly and do my work (I'll probably have to work from home), I'll be happy. I have plenty of consoles for gaming.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by lockedout View Post
    Except that doesn't work. If you want/need a new CPU most likely you'll need a new Mobo and possibly different ram.
    It works exceptionally well, actually. Yes, if you get a new CPU - depending on what MB you have at the moment, you may need a new MB. However, everything else (usually including RAM, as most boards are backward compatible) can stay the same. It's just far, far cheaper. Right now you can get a AMD 8-core 4.2 Ghz processor for $120 and a gigabyte board for $75 (less if you go AMI). That's about $200 for what amounts to a new processor. You cannot come close to getting a new PC for that price. And again, if you decide you want more RAM or a new SSD you can add those whenever you want. Telling someone who has been doing exactly this for literally over 30 years is just silly. And if you read through other responses, I'm not the only one.

  3. #23
    The Insane Kellhound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joebob42 View Post
    Some people never wear the same outfit twice. Some people get a new car every year on lease. Some people change their oil every 1000 miles.

    Some people buy things they don't need and discard things that are still perfectly good.
    Laptops dont age well, and I dont discard old desktop parts. So your comments are nonsensical.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DSRilk View Post
    It works exceptionally well, actually. Yes, if you get a new CPU - depending on what MB you have at the moment, you may need a new MB. However, everything else (usually including RAM, as most boards are backward compatible) can stay the same. It's just far, far cheaper. Right now you can get a AMD 8-core 4.2 Ghz processor for $120 and a gigabyte board for $75 (less if you go AMI). That's about $200 for what amounts to a new processor. You cannot come close to getting a new PC for that price. And again, if you decide you want more RAM or a new SSD you can add those whenever you want. Telling someone who has been doing exactly this for literally over 30 years is just silly. And if you read through other responses, I'm not the only one.
    DDR2/DDR3/DDR4 are not compatible with each other.
    Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    “Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons.”
    "His knowledge on that topic is only power point deep..." "Power corrupts and PowerPoint corrupts absolutely."
    "Who's the more foolish? The fool, or the fool who follows him?"

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellhound View Post
    DDR2/DDR3/DDR4 are not compatible with each other.
    I never said you could, nor does that have anything to do with what I was saying. However, if you want to discuss RAM compatibility... you can find AM3+ MBs that support both DDR2 (usually unbuffered) and DDR3, for example; useful if you have some old DDR2 RAM and didn't feel like forking over $50 bucks for new RAM. The fact that you can't mix DDR2 and 3 isn't relevant to backward compatibility. Yes, you have to know what you're buying, but it's not that complicated. I honestly don't understand why people in this thread seem to be arguing against piecemeal builds (some even going so far as to say it doesn't even work, all evidence to the contrary) when it's blatantly obvious that a great many of us have been doing it for decades with great success.

  5. #25
    When you are playing a new game or using a rendering software sometimes you PC gets stuck. Sometimes it says that PC is not responding. At that, you should change your PC.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Medium9 View Post
    Cond. 2: Best time to buy is shortly after a new generation of CPU and/or GPU was released, because the previous generations will drop quite a bit usually.
    Best time to buy is when you have the $$ on hand to buy upgrades. AMD/Nvidia might have some price drops but not enough to put off upgrading longer than a month. Intel does not drop prices and because Intel change sockets all the time supply/demand can actually increase price of old cpu's. When I wanted a new in box 2500k cheapest I could find online was $400+. Haswell had just launched so I ended up getting a Z87 Mobo + 4670k and saving cash getting current gen hardware.

    https://pcpartpicker.com/trends/pric...ore-i7.skylake

    iirc 7700k was released Jan of this year and 8700k was in Oct. In Jan the skylake i7 fairly stable price dropping very little and actually went up in price with the coffee lake release in Oct.
    | Intel i5-4670k | Asus Z87-Pro | Xigmatek Dark Knight | Kingston HyperX Fury White 16GB | Sapphire R9 270x | Crucial MX300 750GB | WD 500GB Black | WD 1TB Blue | Cooler Master Haf-X | Corsair AX1200 | Dell 2412m | Ducky Shine 3 | Logitech G13 | Sennheiser HD598 | Mionix Naos 8200 |

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by lockedout View Post
    Except that doesn't work. If you want/need a new CPU most likely you'll need a new Mobo and possibly different ram.
    this opens the question up though, what counts as a "new computer"

    the cool thing about a pc is you don't need to buy brand new everything very often, if ever in your life, barring some horrible disaster or some-such. you can swap bits out. cpu/mobo/ram is usually the biggest change, but if you have the same case, psu, graphics card, peripherals, is it really a new computer

    i don't think there is a right or wrong answer to the above? maybe when you get to the point that your broom has had 15 new handles and 12 new heads, maybe then it is a new pc.

  8. #28
    The Lightbringer Logwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MICHAELP View Post
    When you are playing a new game or using a rendering software sometimes you PC gets stuck. Sometimes it says that PC is not responding. At that, you should change your PC.
    No.... no your shouldn't.

  9. #29
    The Insane Kellhound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSRilk View Post
    I never said you could, nor does that have anything to do with what I was saying. However, if you want to discuss RAM compatibility... you can find AM3+ MBs that support both DDR2 (usually unbuffered) and DDR3, for example; useful if you have some old DDR2 RAM and didn't feel like forking over $50 bucks for new RAM. The fact that you can't mix DDR2 and 3 isn't relevant to backward compatibility. Yes, you have to know what you're buying, but it's not that complicated. I honestly don't understand why people in this thread seem to be arguing against piecemeal builds (some even going so far as to say it doesn't even work, all evidence to the contrary) when it's blatantly obvious that a great many of us have been doing it for decades with great success.
    Most boards are NOT backwards compatible between RAM types. CPU/MoBo/RAM are generally best replaced together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the boar View Post
    this opens the question up though, what counts as a "new computer"

    the cool thing about a pc is you don't need to buy brand new everything very often, if ever in your life, barring some horrible disaster or some-such. you can swap bits out. cpu/mobo/ram is usually the biggest change, but if you have the same case, psu, graphics card, peripherals, is it really a new computer

    i don't think there is a right or wrong answer to the above? maybe when you get to the point that your broom has had 15 new handles and 12 new heads, maybe then it is a new pc.
    Often times you can get a better bang for your buck by upgrading your GPU and mass storage than your CPU. If you go with Microsoft's view, a new MoBo = new computer.
    Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    “Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons.”
    "His knowledge on that topic is only power point deep..." "Power corrupts and PowerPoint corrupts absolutely."
    "Who's the more foolish? The fool, or the fool who follows him?"

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellhound View Post
    Laptops dont age well, and I dont discard old desktop parts. So your comments are nonsensical.

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    DDR2/DDR3/DDR4 are not compatible with each other.
    many motherboards for upgraders have different ram slots, so u can still use your old ddr2 sticks, and upgrade to ddr3 later a year later or so. I used such a motherboard, it cost 50 Euro and it supported up to amd 8 core cpus. And oh: up until march this year, i used the case of my old pentium 90.
    I still use a power supply from 2008.
    Buying a new pc systems if you already have one that is less than 15 years old, is not a good decision for people who can read a little bit up on the pc stuff. Buy the parts u need / want, and u are cheaper in the long run by a LOT.

    The only hassle i currently have is not having enough IDE slots for all the old drives and stuff, and i still have some ISA stuff lying around.

  11. #31
    The Insane Kellhound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holofernes View Post
    many motherboards for upgraders have different ram slots, so u can still use your old ddr2 sticks, and upgrade to ddr3 later a year later or so. I used such a motherboard, it cost 50 Euro and it supported up to amd 8 core cpus. And oh: up until march this year, i used the case of my old pentium 90.
    I still use a power supply from 2008.
    Buying a new pc systems if you already have one that is less than 15 years old, is not a good decision for people who can read a little bit up on the pc stuff. Buy the parts u need / want, and u are cheaper in the long run by a LOT.
    Yes, there are a few, but not most. I still have an IBM AT case for fun builds, but cases are just boxes. I have 6 computers newer than 2008 in my house, and none of them are worth upgrading, at best I can reuse the case, CD-RW drives, and maybe the PSU if I am building a lower power system. The rest is all junk or not worth relying on (old HHDs).
    Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    “Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons.”
    "His knowledge on that topic is only power point deep..." "Power corrupts and PowerPoint corrupts absolutely."
    "Who's the more foolish? The fool, or the fool who follows him?"

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellhound View Post
    Most boards are NOT backwards compatible between RAM types. CPU/MoBo/RAM are generally best replaced together.
    I really don't understand why you're arguing points I never made and that aren't relevant. For one thing, you're ignoring the fact that DDR3 came out what, about a decade ago? Thus you could safely upgrade (and I have) with the same RAM for the last decade or so if you had DDR3 back then without (generally, especially in the AMD world) worrying about the MB at all.

    I've been upgrading machines like this for almost 30 years. I've had the same RAM in both my boxes for the last 3 or 4 MB/CPU upgrades. I've replaced CPUs without updating the MB several times and even occasionally updated the MB without upgrading the CPU or RAM in order to change up the number of SATA ports and update the USB ports. I've also replaced virtually the entire internal workings at once before, but it's certainly not necessary in every situation.

    What you need to replace depends entirely on what you currently have and what you want to buy. I never said otherwise. My point is it's totally feasible to only replace one or two parts at a time (again, depending on what you own and what you want to upgrade to), NOT that it's the only way to do it or that you don't sometimes want or need to update more than one component at a time. Yeesh!

    Maybe I just give people more credit than you do. I assume they know that if their MB only supports AM3 and the CPU says it requires AM3+ that at the very least they should look up whether or not they can put an AM3+ CPU in the AM3 socket on their current MB. I assume that if I (and many others) could figure this stuff out without too much difficulty in the era before the Internet was a place where you could efficiently look things up in 3 seconds like you can today, that surely modern users can use Google to find answers and won't just start jamming parts together and hoping for the best.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kellhound View Post
    Yes, there are a few, but not most. I still have an IBM AT case for fun builds, but cases are just boxes. I have 6 computers newer than 2008 in my house, and none of them are worth upgrading, at best I can reuse the case, CD-RW drives, and maybe the PSU if I am building a lower power system. The rest is all junk or not worth relying on (old HHDs).
    I often keep old parts for troubleshooting. It's nice to have an extra PSU or graphics card lying around so you can test things out and know what you really need to replace. I also like old parts because I can let the kids rip them open to see what the inner workings actually look like on some of the old mechanical pieces.

    <edit>Apologies for sounding (and being) grumpy - I'm writing this while taking a break from debugging something and am in a bit of a mood apparently. Sorry </edit>
    Last edited by DSRilk; 2017-12-08 at 05:11 AM.

  13. #33
    I'm a little bit of a thrifty person and my last PC lasted 7 years before I decided to replace it, but I think a good way to see if you need to change your PC is to check the FPS that you get on games you currently play. For me, I was playing GTA IV at 12 FPS on the lowest setting, the game was not enjoyable at that point and I knew I had to upgrade.

  14. #34
    If I just want to use my computer for going online and doing work, should I just keep it until it stops working?

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by VGAddict View Post
    If I just want to use my computer for going online and doing work, should I just keep it until it stops working?
    While it's doing everything you need from it, it's still offering value. Be mindful that a fully updated version of windows is more secure for your average internet user, and this may come with a hardware overhead. Outside that consideration, a 256gb ssd for your boot drive would probably be money well spent, and can go into a new build when you've had enough with the current.

  16. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by DSRilk View Post
    I really don't understand why you're arguing points I never made and that aren't relevant. For one thing, you're ignoring the fact that DDR3 came out what, about a decade ago? Thus you could safely upgrade (and I have) with the same RAM for the last decade or so if you had DDR3 back then without (generally, especially in the AMD world) worrying about the MB at all.

    I've been upgrading machines like this for almost 30 years. I've had the same RAM in both my boxes for the last 3 or 4 MB/CPU upgrades. I've replaced CPUs without updating the MB several times and even occasionally updated the MB without upgrading the CPU or RAM in order to change up the number of SATA ports and update the USB ports. I've also replaced virtually the entire internal workings at once before, but it's certainly not necessary in every situation.

    What you need to replace depends entirely on what you currently have and what you want to buy. I never said otherwise. My point is it's totally feasible to only replace one or two parts at a time (again, depending on what you own and what you want to upgrade to), NOT that it's the only way to do it or that you don't sometimes want or need to update more than one component at a time. Yeesh!

    Maybe I just give people more credit than you do. I assume they know that if their MB only supports AM3 and the CPU says it requires AM3+ that at the very least they should look up whether or not they can put an AM3+ CPU in the AM3 socket on their current MB. I assume that if I (and many others) could figure this stuff out without too much difficulty in the era before the Internet was a place where you could efficiently look things up in 3 seconds like you can today, that surely modern users can use Google to find answers and won't just start jamming parts together and hoping for the best.

    - - - Updated - - -



    I often keep old parts for troubleshooting. It's nice to have an extra PSU or graphics card lying around so you can test things out and know what you really need to replace. I also like old parts because I can let the kids rip them open to see what the inner workings actually look like on some of the old mechanical pieces.

    <edit>Apologies for sounding (and being) grumpy - I'm writing this while taking a break from debugging something and am in a bit of a mood apparently. Sorry </edit>
    in what way does "you may need a new MB. However, everything else (usually including RAM, as most boards are backward compatible) can stay the same." not imply your claimed RAM to have at least some backward compatible.

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Jekys12yearold brother View Post
    in what way does "you may need a new MB. However, everything else (usually including RAM, as most boards are backward compatible) can stay the same." not imply your claimed RAM to have at least some backward compatible.
    The RAM you bought 10 years ago (DDR3) works with most boards built today. When a new tech comes out, the new boards often support both (which you can see from older and even some current MBs that still support both DDR 2 and 3). From a pragmatic perspective, it's common to be able to keep your existing RAM when upgrading. I used the term backward compatibility to mean both things; I can see the confusion that could cause, perhaps it was a poor choice of phrase. My point, however, remains the same and still accurate.

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