Beta Key Giveaway Week 3: Winners have been selected!

  1. #1
    The Squared Circle Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    24,194

    Autism's social deficits are reversed by an anti-cancer drug

    Autism's social deficits are reversed by an anti-cancer drug
    Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0312201647.htm

    Using an epigenetic mechanism, romidepsin restored gene expression and alleviated social deficits in animal models of autism

    New research reveals the first evidence that it may be possible to use a single compound to alleviate the behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorder by targeting sets of genes involved in the disease. The research demonstrated that brief treatment with a very low dose of romidepsin, an anti-cancer drug, restored social deficits in animal models of autism in a sustained fashion.

    Of all the challenges that come with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the social difficulties are among the most devastating. Currently, there is no treatment for this primary symptom of ASD. New research at the University at Buffalo reveals the first evidence that it may be possible to use a single compound to alleviate the behavioral symptoms by targeting sets of genes involved in the disease.

    The research, published today in Nature Neuroscience, demonstrated that brief treatment with a very low dose of romidepsin, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-cancer drug, restored social deficits in animal models of autism in a sustained fashion.

    The three-day treatment reversed social deficits in mice deficient in a gene called Shank 3, an important risk factor for ASD. This effect lasted for three weeks, spanning the juvenile to late adolescent period, a critical developmental stage for social and communication skills. That is equivalent to several years in humans, suggesting the effects of a similar treatment could potentially be long-lasting, the researchers say.

    Profound, prolonged effect

    "We have discovered a small molecule compound that shows a profound and prolonged effect on autism-like social deficits without obvious side effects, while many currently used compounds for treating a variety of psychiatric diseases have failed to exhibit the therapeutic efficacy for this core symptom of autism," said Zhen Yan, PhD, professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB, and senior author on the paper.

    The study builds on her previous research from 2015. That work revealed how the loss of Shank 3 disrupts neuronal communications by affecting the function of the NMDA (n-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, a critical player in regulating cognition and emotion, leading to deficits in social preference that are common in ASD.

    In the new research, the UB scientists found they could reverse those social deficits with a very low dose of romidepsin, which, they found, restores gene expression and function using an epigenetic mechanism, where gene changes are caused by influences other than DNA sequences. Yan noted that human genetics studies have suggested that epigenetic abnormalities likely play a major role in ASD.

    To pursue these promising findings, Yan has founded a startup company called ASDDR, which was awarded a Small Business Technology Transfer grant from the National Institutes of Health last summer for more than $770,000.

    Epigenetics in ASD

    Many of the mutations in ASD, Yan explained, result from chromatin remodeling factors, which are involved in dynamically changing the structure of chromatin, the complex of genetic material in the cell nucleus that condenses into chromosomes.

    "The extensive overlap in risk genes for autism and cancer, many of which are chromatin remodeling factors, supports the idea of repurposing epigenetic drugs used in cancer treatment as targeted treatments for autism," said Yan.

    She and her colleagues knew that chromatin regulators -- which control how genetic material gains access to a cell's transcriptional machinery -- were key to treating the social deficits in ASD, but the challenge was to know how to affect key risk factors at once.

    "Autism involves the loss of so many genes," Yan explained. "To rescue the social deficits, a compound has to affect a number of genes that are involved in neuronal communication."

    To do so, the team turned to a type of chromatin remodeler called histone modifiers. They modify proteins called histones that help organize genetic material in the nucleus so gene expression can be regulated. Since many genes are altered in autism, the UB scientists knew a histone modifier might be effective.

    Loosening up chromatin

    In particular, they were interested in histone deacetylase (HDAC), a family of histone modifiers that are critically involved in the remodeling of chromatin structure and the transcriptional regulation of targeted genes.

    "In the autism model, HDAC2 is abnormally high, which makes the chromatin in the nucleus very tight, preventing genetic material from accessing the transcriptional machinery it needs to be expressed," said Yan. "Once HDAC2 is upregulated, it diminishes genes that should not be suppressed, and leads to behavioral changes, such as the autism-like social deficits."

    But the anti-cancer drug romidepsin, a highly potent HDAC inhibitor, turned down the effects of HDAC2, allowing genes involved in neuronal signaling to be expressed normally.

    "The HDAC inhibitor loosens up the densely packed chromatin so that the transcriptional machinery gains access to the promoter area of the genes; thus they can be expressed," Yan said.

    The rescue effect on gene expression was widespread. When Yan and her co-authors conducted genome-wide screening at the Genomics and Bioinformatics Core at UB's New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, they found that romidepsin restored the majority of the more than 200 genes that were suppressed in the autism animal model they used.

    "The advantage of being able to adjust a set of genes identified as key autism risk factors may explain the strong and long-lasting efficacy of this therapeutic agent for autism." Yan explained. She and her colleagues will continue their focus on discovering and developing better therapeutic agents for autism.
    This may not work in humans, or for all forms of ASD, but looks like it may be possible.

  2. #2
    Merely a Setback Hubcap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Reno NV desert
    Posts
    29,249
    Autistics in the nanny states say "oh crap!"

  3. #3
    Epic! Voidism's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    In the shadows, lurking
    Posts
    1,605
    I'd love a "cure" for my autism. Hopefully this is the first step towards that.

  4. #4
    The Squared Circle Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    24,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Voidism View Post
    I'd love a "cure" for my autism. Hopefully this is the first step towards that.
    Not sure I would want to cure it if I could... It has pros and cons for me... I know that's not the case for everyone with ASD though.

  5. #5
    make my autism less bad, AND stay cancer free? sign me up!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Connal View Post
    Not sure I would want to cure it if I could... It has pros and cons for me... I know that's not the case for everyone with ASD though.
    Eh, I've come to terms with it. It may help my daughter, though.

  7. #7
    Why are they developing drugs when there's already a cure for autism - MMS?


  8. #8
    Legendary! Daemos daemonium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Land of moose and goose.
    Posts
    6,849
    I don’t take any meds for it now doudt I’ll take any in the future.

  9. #9
    The Squared Circle Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    24,194
    Quote Originally Posted by ramjb View Post
    Why are they developing drugs when there's already a cure for autism - MMS?

    This is bunk. People that do this to their kids are actually abusing their children.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ramjb View Post
    Why are they developing drugs when there's already a cure for autism - MMS?
    MMS is bleach.

  11. #11
    I am Murloc! Phookah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Zebes, SR-21
    Posts
    5,426
    Quote Originally Posted by ramjb View Post
    Why are they developing drugs when there's already a cure for autism - MMS?
    That shit is basically bleach, and anyone who participates in it is the highest level of idiot. Junk "science", especially concerning medial issues, is dangerous and stupid.

  12. #12
    Merely a Setback Hubcap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Reno NV desert
    Posts
    29,249
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...ht-study-finds

    Different neurological conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder appear to have more in common than scientists thought they did. A new study finds that they have important similarities at a molecular level.

    And understanding the molecular basis of those disorders could help in developing better treatments.

    These conditions are diagnosed by how a patient behaves. There are no clear signs on a brain "that you can see with your eyes or most microscopic techniques," says Dan Geschwind, a professor of neurogenetics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His team's findings were published in Science this week.

    The conditions are different from brain diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, which physically change the brain. In those cases, a doctor can look at a brain and say what the patient suffered from.

    But recent advances in genetics allowed the scientists to pinpoint the patterns of gene expression in the brain that are linked to these disorders.

    Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes
    SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS
    Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes
    In a large-scale study, they measured RNA in 700 tissue samples from the brains of people with autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and alcoholism, and compared them with tissue of people without these disorders. RNA can show which genes are turned on and off in the tissue.




    Even if they do cure it, we'll still have to have training to act like normies.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Connal View Post
    Autism's social deficits are reversed by an anti-cancer drug
    Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0312201647.htm



    This may not work in humans, or for all forms of ASD, but looks like it may be possible.
    Sounds interesting to be sure. But I remain sceptical.
    I have to say that, as someone with ASD (Aspergers) I feel like the biggest problem isn’t social, but emotional. I don’t regulate emotion like a normal individual and that’s by far the worst part of it. That’s why depression and substance abuse is so common in conjunction with ASD.
    You grow to learn how to handle social situations and it’s manageable.

  14. #14
    Elemental Lord Dukenukemx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Better part of NJ
    Posts
    8,123
    These same drugs are also reversing grey hair. That's something to look at.

  15. #15
    The Squared Circle Connal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    24,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Creamy Flames View Post
    Sounds interesting to be sure. But I remain sceptical.
    I have to say that, as someone with ASD (Aspergers) I feel like the biggest problem isn’t social, but emotional. I don’t regulate emotion like a normal individual and that’s by far the worst part of it. That’s why depression and substance abuse is so common in conjunction with ASD.
    You grow to learn how to handle social situations and it’s manageable.
    That is an issue I had, and still have to a certain degree if I am not mindful. But meditation, at least for me, has helped a lot. I watch my mood at all times, and can "dismiss" unhelpful emotions. Or just outright disassociate from them completely.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Hubcap View Post
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...ht-study-finds

    Different neurological conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder appear to have more in common than scientists thought they did. A new study finds that they have important similarities at a molecular level.

    And understanding the molecular basis of those disorders could help in developing better treatments.

    These conditions are diagnosed by how a patient behaves. There are no clear signs on a brain "that you can see with your eyes or most microscopic techniques," says Dan Geschwind, a professor of neurogenetics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His team's findings were published in Science this week.

    The conditions are different from brain diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, which physically change the brain. In those cases, a doctor can look at a brain and say what the patient suffered from.

    But recent advances in genetics allowed the scientists to pinpoint the patterns of gene expression in the brain that are linked to these disorders.

    Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes
    SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS
    Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes
    In a large-scale study, they measured RNA in 700 tissue samples from the brains of people with autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and alcoholism, and compared them with tissue of people without these disorders. RNA can show which genes are turned on and off in the tissue.




    Even if they do cure it, we'll still have to have training to act like normies.

    Well, we have that in common with AI. AI needs to be trained to interact with humans...

  16. #16
    Legendary! Daemos daemonium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Land of moose and goose.
    Posts
    6,849
    Quote Originally Posted by Creamy Flames View Post
    Sounds interesting to be sure. But I remain sceptical.
    I have to say that, as someone with ASD (Aspergers) I feel like the biggest problem isn’t social, but emotional. I don’t regulate emotion like a normal individual and that’s by far the worst part of it. That’s why depression and substance abuse is so common in conjunction with ASD.
    You grow to learn how to handle social situations and it’s manageable.
    I find it easyier to deal with enomtions (or lack there of) most of the time but social situations are pretty horrible which is why I work with animals and try to interact with as few people as possible.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ramjb View Post
    Why are they developing drugs when there's already a cure for autism - MMS?

    Grade A idiot.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •