Beta Key Giveaway Week 2: Winners have been selected!

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  1. #121
    Sure let's divide California several times so that we get 8-12 additional dem senators.

    That's okay, right?

  2. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by Slacker76 View Post
    So true. Spending a lot of time in the Eastern Sierra counties like Mono and Inyo. The largest single employer is Caltrans. So not only would rural counties lose infrastructure, they would lose employment.

    Or a place like Susanville, the biggest employer are the state prisons.
    It's a beautiful place to visit for hunting and fishing. But the barroom conversations get cringey as fuck.
    I agree. People don’t realize how much some of these counties depend on the State.

    Here is another example. Even with a salary offer of 280k and student loan repayment program of up to 60k if they stay at least 3 years, Modoc is having problem getting a family practitioner. My sister has been volunteering twice a month to come to Modoc all the way from San Francisco to see patients on Friday and Saturday. She is not the only one. She is a Radiologist btw, not even an FP.

    It is that bad.

    If you have an accident, depending on the severity, there are no major trauma centers in some of those counties. You will need a medic helicopter.

    Guess who pays for the upkeep and crew?
    Last edited by Rasulis; 2018-06-14 at 04:28 PM.

  3. #123
    The Insane Sky High's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s_bushido View Post
    My guess would be Real Americans.
    I swear to fuck these foreign fuckies who open their mouths about american demographics always piss me off the most with how ignorant they actually are. "the Spanish part" prior to the Mexican, american war was half of what the country is now.

  4. #124
    Lego Moderator GothamCity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunseeker View Post
    As someone who lived in one of those areas, and now lives in the Midwest, it's still a very California Republican.
    True. I lived in rural western Pennsylvania for most of my childhood, in a city of less than 1k people. There's definitely a line between CA Republican and PA Republican.
    "Okay, Robin. Together, we're gonna punch these guys so hard, words describing the impact are gonna spontaneously materialize out of thin air."
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  5. #125
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwarfhamster View Post
    Not gonna happen. And even if voters in California approved it, it's against the US Constitution.

    Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1: New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.

    See bolded.
    You missed to include the important part, I underlined it for you.

    So if the Congress and California both are ok with it it is possible.

    Obviously California would cede jurisdiction of the parts that form a new state to said new state, the bolded part just means that there cannot be any conflicting jurisdiction.

  6. #126
    Quote Originally Posted by GothamCity View Post
    True. I lived in rural western Pennsylvania for most of my childhood, in a city of less than 1k people. There's definitely a line between CA Republican and PA Republican.
    Alpine County in California actually has a population of 1,110. It was 1,175 during the 2010 census. Although the district is Republican, the county is majority Democrats (+19%).

    Just to show people that even smack dab in the heart of the so called California rural red counties, there are concentrations of blue communities.

    Here is what it says on a warning sign in a residential area.

    Do not park vehicles on roadways or along the edge of roadways. Vehicles blocking snow removal operations will be towed at owner’s expense. County Code Chapter 10.12 requires that all vehicles must park a minimum of five (5) feet off the roadway on your property.

    The parking or standing of vehicles is prohibited on Montgomery Street from Highway 89 to Laramie Street on Tuesdays and Fridays from 8:00 a.m. to noon.

    Do not clear your driveway until after your road has been plowed. This will reduce the amount of snow that the plow leaves as it passes your driveway.

    Do not play, ski, toboggan, sled or snowmobile on roadways, snow berms or along roadway edges. Cars, trucks and snowplows cannot stop quickly on snow and ice.

    Do not allow children and pets to play on roadways, in snow berms or along edges.

    Do not park in restricted areas of County Parking Lots.
    Last edited by Rasulis; 2018-06-14 at 07:03 PM.

  7. #127
    this won't happen, but it does give people the opportunity to daydream about the hypothetical:

    1) lawmakers in NorCal currently dictate that California is a sanctuary state, but SoCal is actually the most affected. If SoCal becomes its own red state, that law would go bye-bye, creating a barrier for undocumented immigrants between Mexico and the other Californias.
    2) what about the fate of the weed industry? not evenly distributed throughout the state
    3) Hollywood's influence on local politics potentially diminished due to limiting them to "California"
    4) effects on taxes and utilities
    5) Going through state borders just to go from SD/Riverside to LA? Crazy!

  8. #128
    Can't see urban lawmakers in CA ever approving something like this. I don't know if it has been touched on in this thread, but a big reason I see this as a no go is that the large coastal cities are heavily dependent on western and northern CA for water. These water supply and rights issues could get even uglier than they already are if CA split.

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanishninja View Post
    this won't happen, but it does give people the opportunity to daydream about the hypothetical:

    1) lawmakers in NorCal currently dictate that California is a sanctuary state, but SoCal is actually the most affected. If SoCal becomes its own red state, that law would go bye-bye, creating a barrier for undocumented immigrants between Mexico and the other Californias.
    2) what about the fate of the weed industry? not evenly distributed throughout the state
    3) Hollywood's influence on local politics potentially diminished due to limiting them to "California"
    4) effects on taxes and utilities
    5) Going through state borders just to go from SD/Riverside to LA? Crazy!
    Um, just because the lawmakers meet in Sacramento doesn't mean they are from Sacramento...

  10. #130
    Lego Moderator GothamCity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanishninja View Post
    1) lawmakers in NorCal currently dictate that California is a sanctuary state, but SoCal is actually the most affected. If SoCal becomes its own red state, that law would go bye-bye, creating a barrier for undocumented immigrants between Mexico and the other Californias.
    The majority of law makers are from Southern California. California is roughly 39.5M people. The Greater Los Angeles Region (which includes OC and some others) is 18.7M. San Diego is 3.1M. Those together at 21.8M, well above half. The districts are split by population, with over half of all state legislative seats coming from SoCal. So SoCal has the most say, together SoCal could band into a coalition and enforce their will over the rest of the state.

    @Wyrt might also find this interesting/informative if you didn't already know it.
    "Okay, Robin. Together, we're gonna punch these guys so hard, words describing the impact are gonna spontaneously materialize out of thin air."
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  11. #131
    Quote Originally Posted by GothamCity View Post
    The majority of law makers are from Southern California. California is roughly 39.5M people. The Greater Los Angeles Region (which includes OC and some others) is 18.7M. San Diego is 3.1M. Those together at 21.8M, well above half. The districts are split by population, with over half of all state legislative seats coming from SoCal. So SoCal has the most say, together SoCal could band into a coalition and enforce their will over the rest of the state.

    @Wyrt might also find this interesting/informative if you didn't already know it.
    Logically Southern California politicians should dominate since it has larger population base, more congressional and state assembly districts. However, all of Democrat's state wide offices are held by Northern California politicians - Jerry Brown, Barbara Boxer and her replacement Kamala Harris, Dianne Feinstein, and the primary election winner Gavin Newsom. Antonio Villaraigosa fizzled due to low LA County voters turnout (14%). There is no chance in hell Kevin De Leon will beat Feinstein.

  12. #132
    Lego Moderator GothamCity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    Logically Southern California politicians should dominate since it has larger population base, more congressional and state assembly districts. However, all of Democrat's state wide offices are held by Northern California politicians - Jerry Brown, Barbara Boxer and her replacement Kamala Harris, Dianne Feinstein, and the primary election winner Gavin Newsom. Antonio Villaraigosa fizzled due to low LA County voters turnout (14%). There is no chance in hell Kevin De Leon will beat Feinstein.
    Our state tends to be pretty unified. There are disagreements over stuff like water, but we don't really see a NorCal/SoCal divide. We recognize they're different geographically, but hardly anyone harbors ill will for the other side. Brown was a great governor from a few decades ago who reran. Harris was a great Attorney General and had support from the Democratic Party as a whole. Newsom was basically a shoe in since Brown wanted him as his Lt. Governor.

    I can say, personally, as someone who lives in Orange County, I have no issue with our star politicians being from the North. I preferred Harris to my own Congresswoman, Sanchez. I preferred Newsom to Villaraigosa. Feinstein is a great senator and I am glad she is running again.
    Last edited by GothamCity; 2018-06-15 at 12:17 AM.
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  13. #133
    The Insane Kujako's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GothamCity View Post
    Our state tends to be pretty unified. There are disagreements over stuff like water, but we don't really see a NorCal/SoCal divide. We recognize they're different geographically, but hardly anyone harbors ill will for the other side. Brown was a great governor from a few decades ago who reran. Harris was a great Attorney General and had support from the Democratic Party as a whole. Newsom was basically a shoe in since Brown wanted him as his Lt. Governor.
    That and Cox is a crazy person...
    It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.

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  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    Logically Southern California politicians should dominate since it has larger population base, more congressional and state assembly districts. However, all of Democrat's state wide offices are held by Northern California politicians - Jerry Brown, Barbara Boxer and her replacement Kamala Harris, Dianne Feinstein, and the primary election winner Gavin Newsom. Antonio Villaraigosa fizzled due to low LA County voters turnout (14%). There is no chance in hell Kevin De Leon will beat Feinstein.
    I was surprised Villaraigosa lost to Newsom in LA.

    California does have issues with low voter turnout though. Particularly Democrats having low turn out. That's how we got things like Arnold for 2 terms as governor and Prop 8 passing.

  15. #135
    Lego Moderator GothamCity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kujako View Post
    That and Cox is a crazy person...
    I am still amazed that Republicans even try to field a red governor. Oh well.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrt View Post
    I was surprised Villaraigosa lost to Newsom in LA.

    California does have issues with low voter turnout though. Particularly Democrats having low turn out. That's how we got things like Arnold for 2 terms as governor and Prop 8 passing.
    Yeah, we see California as the safest of safe blue states, so Democrats feel safe just staying home. It is likely what lost Democrats WI, PA, and MI.
    "Okay, Robin. Together, we're gonna punch these guys so hard, words describing the impact are gonna spontaneously materialize out of thin air."
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  16. #136
    The Insane Kujako's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GothamCity View Post
    I am still amazed that Republicans even try to field a red governor. Oh well.
    Anytime they're ready to put up an actual fiscal conservative I'll pay attention to what they have to say, till then...
    It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning.

    -Kujako-

  17. #137
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrt View Post
    I was surprised Villaraigosa lost to Newsom in LA.

    California does have issues with low voter turnout though. Particularly Democrats having low turn out. That's how we got things like Arnold for 2 terms as governor and Prop 8 passing.
    It was a low turnout primary (only 21% of CA registered voters showed up) which should have been to the GOP advantage. Which it was. Democrats turnout was only 40% of the 2016 election, and Republican was 68%.

    However, Republican's share of the Governor's vote was only 35% of the total vote. Interesting, no? It almost appears that some Republicans voted for Democrats.

    We know for sure that a whole bunch of Republicans must have voted for Dianne Feinstein. She won every single districts. Including the supposedly GOP districts. Despite his LA base not showing up (only 14% turn out), Kevin De Leon still managed to come in second. Democrat's share of the vote is 65%.

    The numbers that came out of the contested districts are pretty interesting also.

    District 48 - Dana Rohrabacher should have been GOP +11 based on voter registration. Instead it is only GOP +3.

    District 49 should have been GOP +5, instead it is GOP -2.

    District 45 should have been GOP +9, instead it is GOP +2.

    The same with the local elections also. Despite the higher percentage of Republican showing up, the results swing toward Democrats pretty hard.

    California Assembly District 78, which includes Camp Pendleton, has always been GOP country. Democrats never bothered to compete in the past. Now the fight for the State assembly seat will be between 2 Democrats.

    If Democrats/Independent/No Party show up in November, GOP will be in for a lot of pain in California.

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