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  1. #21
    The Insane
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Stormbringer View Post
    They should be under even stricter guidelines than GMOs, considering the speed and depth that changes can be made, and I'm someone that's for CRISPR. I just also see the capacity for people to abuse it and bring about the apocalypse if they fuck up.
    Could you give an example of how editting a crop could be abused by an organization, and why.

  2. #22
    The Forgettable Forgettable's Avatar
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    We've been eating gene-edited food for 100 years or more. The gene editing process has just been much, much slower.

  3. #23
    The Lightbringer SinR's Avatar
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    The future is now

    Now if only people could get their heads out of their asses regarding this and GMO's
    We're all newbs, some are just more newbier than others.

    Just a burned out hardcore raider turned casual.
    I had BfA Alpha. Then I had BfA Beta. Now I has BfA. Meh
    No Classic Beta. Even if I got it I probably wouldn't play.

  4. #24
    Old God Low Hanging Fruit's Avatar
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    Oh well, just another walk along the razor. If everything works out great for us.. if it goes totally to shit.. well.. shit happens. Nothing I can do to stop it.

  5. #25
    Scarab Lord Sting's Avatar
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    The only difference between regular gene modification and CRISPR is the method in which you modify the genes. The claim that they differ significantly is completely bogus. You can also use regular modification to only make changes that could occur naturally or use CRISPR to transfer genes between species.

    I'm still glad they wont be as strictly regulated as regular GMO though. Gene modification is a really powerful tool and it's about time we put it to good use without all the stigmas.
    ( ° ͜ʖ͡°)╭∩╮

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  6. #26
    I already have gene edited by products shot into my veins literally all the damn time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Low Hanging Fruit View Post
    Oh well, just another walk along the razor. If everything works out great for us.. if it goes totally to shit.. well.. shit happens. Nothing I can do to stop it.
    It is a walk along the boardwalk not a razor.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnusthegreat View Post
    Aren't we already doing this?
    In the US yes, in the EU a whole lot less,

  8. #28
    Give me WC3:R, Blizz! The Stormbringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrimaryColor View Post
    Could you give an example of how editting a crop could be abused by an organization, and why.
    Editing the genes of anything can be abused, intentionally or otherwise. Someone makes a new crop that spreads easily, cheaply, and grows fast? Great! They made a mistake and it also causes cancer in anyone that eats it? Bad.

    I'm not saying we should destroy CRISPR and burn all the notes to the ground, just that we need to be careful and take a little time. We're at an unprecedented level of genetic engineering, and a single mistake could set it (and the human race) back quite a ways.

  9. #29
    I've actually somewhat interested in learning gene editing through Cas9 myself, I would encourage most people to look into learning more about it. I know a guy who's using CRISPR to modify his strains of mastiff to be more athletic and healthy and trying to biohacking himself to knockout/suppress myostatin.

    Really interesting and I think this biotech will only surge in usage, especially with the rise of DIY scientists actively attempting to modify bacteria, plants, animals and themselves.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Techno-Druid View Post
    I've actually somewhat interested in learning gene editing through Cas9 myself, I would encourage most people to look into learning more about it. I know a guy who's using CRISPR to modify his strains of mastiff to be more athletic and healthy and trying to biohacking himself to knockout/suppress myostatin.

    Really interesting and I think this biotech will only surge in usage, especially with the rise of DIY scientists actively attempting to modify bacteria, plants, animals and themselves.
    Lol, the guy you know sounds like an absolute idiot who lacks the slightest grasp of what he's actually dealing with, Advise him to do a quick google search to learn about the hundreds if not thousands of other idiots who failed miserably in trying to find the panacea to their specific illness. Leave the science to actual scientist.

    There is a specific gene that naturally protects humans from cancer, the same gene also treats most CRISPR modified genes in the same manner as it does cancer. If it doesn't it's an indicator the gene isn't working properly and increases the likely hood of the specific cells developing cancer greatly.
    Last edited by P for Pancetta; 2019-04-22 at 10:43 PM.

  11. #31
    The Insane
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Stormbringer View Post
    Editing the genes of anything can be abused, intentionally or otherwise. Someone makes a new crop that spreads easily, cheaply, and grows fast? Great! They made a mistake and it also causes cancer in anyone that eats it? Bad.

    I'm not saying we should destroy CRISPR and burn all the notes to the ground, just that we need to be careful and take a little time. We're at an unprecedented level of genetic engineering, and a single mistake could set it (and the human race) back quite a ways.
    You're talking about mistakes. Abuse is done intentionally, mistakes are not.

    As far as the 'uncontrollable growth' fear that would be extraordinary if a plant grew so rapidly that people couldn't control it. That's the theme of various episodes on scifi shows, but it's not very plausible.

  12. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Fabric View Post
    Lol, the guy you know sounds like an absolute idiot who lacks the slightest grasp of what he's actually dealing with, Advise him to do a quick google search to learn about the hundreds if not thousands of other idiots who failed miserably in trying to find the panacea to their specific illness. Leave the science to actual scientist.

    There is a specific gene that naturally protects humans from cancer, the same gene also treats most CRISPR modified genes in the same manner as it does cancer. If it doesn't it's an indicator the gene isn't working properly and increases the likely hood of the specific cells developing cancer greatly.
    I'm sure he knows far more about what he is doing than either of us do. In relation to myostatin knockouts, we've done in various species like mice, dogs, sheep, pigs and cattle with scant negative effects. Myostatin is basically a protein released by muscle cells to regulate muscle growth and removing it leads to unrestricted muscle growth and fat loss.

    There are also humans born without myostatin. There was one boy who could support his own body weight at the age of 2.

  13. #33
    I'm glad I'll be long dead before any of this shit happens.

  14. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Techno-Druid View Post
    (Source)


    CRISPR shows a lot of promise in the agricultural industry; for both livestock and crops. Scientists are able to both remove target gene sequences as well as add them to enhance the size or resilience of crops. How realistic do you find this prediction? Will our food be gene tailored to maximum aesthetic appeal and efficiency?
    Hopefully it will be used to add flavor back to things like chicken, raspberries, and turkeys where selective breeding (aka gene-editing the old fashion way) enhanced them for size and not flavor.

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Techno-Druid View Post
    I'm sure he knows far more about what he is doing than either of us do. In relation to myostatin knockouts, we've done in various species like mice, dogs, sheep, pigs and cattle with scant negative effects. Myostatin is basically a protein released by muscle cells to regulate muscle growth and removing it leads to unrestricted muscle growth and fat loss.

    There are also humans born without myostatin. There was one boy who could support his own body weight at the age of 2.
    Based on your previous post I'm absolutely certain he doesn't. Some wannabe Frankenstein experimenting on himself rarely leads to positive results. In the people born with myotonic hypertrophy it doesn't just "knock-out" the gene in the documented/studied cases (far and few it's a very rare condition). And while most humans with the condition are stronger then your average human it's not known if they're actually stronger then humans who trained to reach a similair muscle mass. Studies have shown that lack of myostatin leads to skeletal muscles with a lack of force compared to "normal" muscles because of a lack of oxidative characteristics of said muscles.

    For some people with certain muscle related diseases these kind of CRISPR solutions might be the perfect medicine. Yet for healthy people it's the same as using steroids, you're muscles will end up being weaker then naturally aquired muscles and at the costs of you putting your health at a serious risk.

  16. #36
    There was one case of a boy that had decreased myostatin production. If I recall his father made certain that his boy worked out, not for the sake of the muscles, but for the sake of bone density to be on par. I've heard too much of guys lifting weights that while they might have had the oomph, their bones didn't.

  17. #37
    https://www.sciencealert.com/fruits-...d-food-natural

    This is what hundreds of years of genetics have produced .we are only doing it now more precisely

  18. #38
    Over 9000! Vash The Stampede's Avatar
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    I'd like my spicy tomatoes now please.


  19. #39
    If it makes food so much cheaper over time that everyone gets alot more available food in safer conditions i can not understand the hate it gets? Plus Spicy tomatoes or like my Twin brother bought a few weeks back cotton candy flavored grapes, bring me the future.

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Forgettable View Post
    We've been eating gene-edited food for 100 years or more. The gene editing process has just been much, much slower.
    Try thousands of years. And not just plants, but animals also. How do you think dogs were created (in particular labridoodles, just a big ol' GMO)? Creating GMO's is what domestication is. Just with modern technology and specifically CRISPR, we can modify a plant or animal from one generation directly into the next , instead of over several generations, breeding in the traits we require.

    Here is a comparison of different fruits and vegetables over the years. https://www.ranker.com/list/common-f...ariel-loveland

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