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  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Forgettable View Post
    I already said that. "100 years or more"
    I just don't think you realize how long ago it was. We started selective breeding and domestication of wolves into dogs before we invented the wheel. By about 11,000 years.

  2. #62
    The Forgettable Forgettable's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by talwynn View Post
    I just don't think you realize how long ago it was. We started selective breeding and domestication of wolves into dogs before we invented the wheel. By about 11,000 years.
    Well you think wrong.

  3. #63
    Bloodsail Admiral smityx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unholyground View Post
    Not if you hold onto seeds and the disease goes extinct too which does happen.
    The Cavindish, which is the species we import and buy at stores, have had seeds bred out of them.

  4. #64
    sweet, maybe they can find a way to make healthy food not taste like shit in my mouth.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by talwynn View Post
    Now, imagine you are ancient man. You have captured a bunch of wolf pups and you want to see what you can do with them.
    Splicing genes from soybeans into dalmations is an entirely different matter than raising a couple strays, and not something that "ancient man" is known to have done.

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Halicia View Post
    Splicing genes from soybeans into dalmations is an entirely different matter than raising a couple strays, and not something that "ancient man" is known to have done.
    No, they did not cross speciate plants and animals, and I never said they did. We haven't even done that really. I pointed out very specifically the domestication of wolves into dogs. Early man is definitely known to have done this. Man did this roughly 15,000 years ago. Then we domesticated plants roughly 10,000 years ago.

    All modern dogs are a genetically modified variation of the ancient grey wolf.

  7. #67
    Scarab Lord Logwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noradin View Post
    Yes, but there is a difference in the time-scales involved.
    Does it really matter if the end result is the same?

  8. #68
    We have been eating gene edited food for the last few thousand years.

    World's not gonna end

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Logwyn View Post
    Does it really matter if the end result is the same?
    It does matter, stating otherwise only shows your lack of knowledge on the topic. This doesn’t mean that gmo’s are a bad thing though. It’s a different proces and with it come different problems.

  10. #70
    If gene-editing can make fried chicken and french fries be healthy and low calorie, sign me up for gene-edited food!

  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by talwynn View Post
    All modern dogs are a genetically modified variation of the ancient grey wolf.
    That claim is outdated and beside the point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Logwyn View Post
    Does it really matter if the end result is the same?
    Can you guarantee that the result is the same?
    If so what is the point in the new technique?--When the result is the same...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pannonian View Post
    We have been eating gene edited food for the last few thousand years.

    World's not gonna end
    No we haven't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabric View Post
    It does matter, stating otherwise only shows your lack of knowledge on the topic. This doesn’t mean that gmo’s are a bad thing though. It’s a different proces and with it come different problems.
    Indeed, it is not a bad thing but it is something that should be approached with caution in mind, not just with profits.

  12. #72
    Frankly, I don't see a problem with it. The better & the healthier the food. and this is not new, we have been for thousands of years choosing the good seeds & sweeter fruits.

    try and eat a wild banana (that wasn't made by a farmer) and tell me how it taste. I tried it and it's shit.

  13. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by smityx View Post
    The Cavindish, which is the species we import and buy at stores, have had seeds bred out of them.
    You can get them back, I have been learning a lot about plants from growing cannabis and there are ways.
    “If you don't believe me that is too damn bad!”

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by PrimaryColor View Post
    You're talking about mistakes. Abuse is done intentionally, mistakes are not.

    As far as the 'uncontrollable growth' fear that would be extraordinary if a plant grew so rapidly that people couldn't control it. That's the theme of various episodes on scifi shows, but it's not very plausible.
    Check out Heracleum Sosnowskyi / Sosnowsky's hogweed for real world example - weed that makes your skin super-sensitive to ultraviolet light.

    The plant was common only in the Caucasus area, until it started to be used as a silage plant in other parts of the Soviet Union. As a result, it quickly spread in many areas of Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine. It is now a highly invasive plant in the Baltic States, Poland, and Belarus.[6] Many river valleys and roadsides are occupied by large stands of this weed. It is difficult to eradicate because the seeds remain viable for many years and the roots are difficult to remove. Herbicides are widely used in a fight against it, but the plant can later resprout from the roots.[7]

    The plant is also used as a shield-hedge along the roads, preventing farm animals from escaping and wild animals from getting in.[3]

    The decision to use the plant for silage was made in 1947, under Stalin's rule, so when the species later proved to be highly invasive and difficult to remove, people started to call it "Stalin's revenge".


    It was used just for a few years until huge problems were discovered with using it (milk from cows that were fed it got unbearably bitter, and their calfs were getting born with deformities).

    It has proven to be impossible to eradicate to this day.
    Last edited by Shalcker; 2019-04-24 at 02:05 PM.

  15. #75
    Cant wait to have chickens as big as cows or strawberrys the size of pumpkins.
    "My brother thinks I'm crazy to play the same game for years. He doesn't understand. I plan to play it for the rest of my life."

  16. #76
    We'been eating gene edited food since about late civilization.

    Apples, tomatoes, peppers, bananas, etc. we're genetically modified via selective breeding in order to get desired traits.

    Tomatoes were small and nearly uneatable, bananas were mostly seeds.

    This is just a scare based on pure ignorance.

  17. #77
    Go eat some wild bananas if you don't want to eat gene edited food.

  18. #78
    Awesome. I wonder if they will be able to make a Cow that has all the tenderness and marbling of a Wagyu but en masse.

  19. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Noradin View Post
    That claim is outdated and beside the point.

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    Can you guarantee that the result is the same?
    If so what is the point in the new technique?--When the result is the same...

    - - - Updated - - -


    No we haven't.

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    Indeed, it is not a bad thing but it is something that should be approached with caution in mind, not just with profits.
    Since the agricultural revolution humans have modified their food genetically. It might not be as targeted as we can do today, but technically its the same, just a different method. Or do you seriously believe your apples and oranges are "natural"?

  20. #80
    Allergy rate goes up to 100%.

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