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    Canada's benefits to birth tourists: 'Go to Canada to vacation and give birth'

    “Go to Canada to vacation and give birth to a child,” says one online ad targeting Mainland Chinese mothers. “U.S. rejected your visa? No problem! In fact, Canada is better!”

    Ads tell women that going to Canada for automatic citizenship is a “gift” for their babies since their children will be able to get free education, cheap university tuition and student loans, according to translations provided by Liberal MLA Jas Johal and verified by Postmedia.

    Under Canadian law, a child born in this country is entitled to Canadian citizenship.

    The ads are being run by brokers offering “one-stop shopping” for women, with offers to put together packages including transportation, housing, meals, contracts, pre- and postnatal medical appointments, shopping and checking in at hospitals. The ads generally do not mention the broker’s fees.

    Some of the ads tell women their offspring can sponsor their parents under family reunification plans once they are adults: “You want to retire in Canada, but you don’t meet the requirements?” asks one such online ad. “You can give birth to your child in Canada. When your child turns 18, your child can apply for the parents.”

    https://vancouversun.com/news/local-...birth-tourists

    I don't mind birth tourism.

    What do you think of birth tourism?
    .

    "This will be a fight against overwhelming odds from which survival cannot be expected. We will do what damage we can."

    -- Capt. Copeland

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by freefolk View Post
    I don't mind birth tourism.

    What do you think of birth tourism?
    That is the rule of all countries in Americas, since, y'know, we parked into reservations the natives ?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by sarahtasher View Post
    That is the rule of all countries in Americas, since, y'know, we parked into reservations the natives ?
    TIL colonization leading into acquisition via horrible methods and backstabbing is the same as birth tourism.

    But I guess you're admitting these people will kill the Canadians.
    Quote Originally Posted by Myobi View Post
    What can I say, I'm sort of an obsessed person
    Indeed you are.

  4. #4
    The Undying Doctor Amadeus's Avatar
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    Speaking as someone with Canadian and U.S Citizenship. Eh no. Shit like this is more common in the states. In Canada it’s real easy to get busted for this shit this along with fake marriages and what not. And yes they’ll check.
    "Intellect alone is useless in a fight...you can't even break a rule, how can you be expected to break bone" Khan Singh

  5. #5
    I Don't Work Here Endus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freefolk View Post
    I don't mind birth tourism.

    What do you think of birth tourism?
    The article (and likely the brokers themselves) significantly underplay this thing.

    Yes, the child is eligible for Canadian citizenship. They have to ask; many don't.
    The child can't emigrate by themselves, and if the parents want to emigrate to Canada with their Canadian-citizen child, they'll need to qualify under the same measures as anyone else.
    The "free education" they pegged is the normal primary/secondary system. Cheap tuition is based on residency, not citizenship. So that gets more complicated.
    Applying to bring family over to Canada is not a guaranteed process, either. Though generally, when it's a country like China, we're pretty in favor of getting people into Canada.

    The problem with arguments against birth tourism is that any move against it also works against immigrants who want to stay and pursue citizenship; their children will not automatically be citizens, even if their parents secure landed immigrant status or citizenship themselves, not unless the children go through the same process as well, despite being born and raised in Canada their entire lives.

    Also, per the article, there were a whopping ~800 births to non-Canadians in British Columbia last year. And I'm willing to bet a lot of those aren't "birth tourism", but just how things happened. So I'm struggling to see a demographic issue.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Amadeus View Post
    Speaking as someone with Canadian and U.S Citizenship. Eh no. Shit like this is more common in the states. In Canada it’s real easy to get busted for this shit this along with fake marriages and what not. And yes they’ll check.
    My cousin married a girl while working in China. They were together for years, and had a kid together, before they started the immigration process to bring her to Canada. She's highly educated and a great candidate in her own rights, and there were concerns China wouldn't let her leave, so her visa's not in question, but she's still, years later, not a citizen yet. Because shit's not that easy. She's on the path, but it's a process, and yeah, even with being married for years and having a kid, their marriage was looked into before this approval came down.

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    Mildly annoying people take advantage of the Canadian tax payer but there is worse misuses I tolerate so its kind of whatever.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    The article (and likely the brokers themselves) significantly underplay this thing.

    Yes, the child is eligible for Canadian citizenship. They have to ask; many don't.
    The child can't emigrate by themselves, and if the parents want to emigrate to Canada with their Canadian-citizen child, they'll need to qualify under the same measures as anyone else.
    The "free education" they pegged is the normal primary/secondary system. Cheap tuition is based on residency, not citizenship. So that gets more complicated.
    Applying to bring family over to Canada is not a guaranteed process, either. Though generally, when it's a country like China, we're pretty in favor of getting people into Canada.

    The problem with arguments against birth tourism is that any move against it also works against immigrants who want to stay and pursue citizenship; their children will not automatically be citizens, even if their parents secure landed immigrant status or citizenship themselves, not unless the children go through the same process as well, despite being born and raised in Canada their entire lives.

    Also, per the article, there were a whopping ~800 births to non-Canadians in British Columbia last year. And I'm willing to bet a lot of those aren't "birth tourism", but just how things happened. So I'm struggling to see a demographic issue.

    - - - Updated - - -



    My cousin married a girl while working in China. They were together for years, and had a kid together, before they started the immigration process to bring her to Canada. She's highly educated and a great candidate in her own rights, and there were concerns China wouldn't let her leave, so her visa's not in question, but she's still, years later, not a citizen yet. Because shit's not that easy. She's on the path, but it's a process, and yeah, even with being married for years and having a kid, their marriage was looked into before this approval came down.
    Even in countries which doesn't have jus soli kids born to immigrant parents who have acquired citizenship will be citizens at birth as long as a parent is.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    The article (and likely the brokers themselves) significantly underplay this thing.

    Yes, the child is eligible for Canadian citizenship. They have to ask; many don't.
    The child can't emigrate by themselves, and if the parents want to emigrate to Canada with their Canadian-citizen child, they'll need to qualify under the same measures as anyone else.
    The "free education" they pegged is the normal primary/secondary system. Cheap tuition is based on residency, not citizenship. So that gets more complicated.
    Applying to bring family over to Canada is not a guaranteed process, either. Though generally, when it's a country like China, we're pretty in favor of getting people into Canada.

    The problem with arguments against birth tourism is that any move against it also works against immigrants who want to stay and pursue citizenship; their children will not automatically be citizens, even if their parents secure landed immigrant status or citizenship themselves, not unless the children go through the same process as well, despite being born and raised in Canada their entire lives.

    Also, per the article, there were a whopping ~800 births to non-Canadians in British Columbia last year. And I'm willing to bet a lot of those aren't "birth tourism", but just how things happened. So I'm struggling to see a demographic issue.


    So you're saying a child born in Canada isn't automatically a citizen? If he shows up in Canada at the age of 18, he isn't automatically considered a citizen?

    In America, if you're born here, you're a citizen. You never need to file for citizenship.
    .

    "This will be a fight against overwhelming odds from which survival cannot be expected. We will do what damage we can."

    -- Capt. Copeland

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by freefolk View Post
    I don't mind birth tourism.

    What do you think of birth tourism?
    Birth tourism is bad. It's also impossible in my country because we don't do jus soli.

  10. #10
    The Undying Doctor Amadeus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    My cousin married a girl while working in China. They were together for years, and had a kid together, before they started the immigration process to bring her to Canada. She's highly educated and a great candidate in her own rights, and there were concerns China wouldn't let her leave, so her visa's not in question, but she's still, years later, not a citizen yet. Because shit's not that easy. She's on the path, but it's a process, and yeah, even with being married for years and having a kid, their marriage was looked into before this approval came down.
    Yeah that’s spectacularly unsurprising, mom and grandmother, grandfather aunts uncles 2nd cousins and relatives then and now. Had I not gotten citizenship when I when I was a child to go to school there is almost no way I’d have citizenship now. Mostly because of what you describe the long wait and processing time.

    Keep in mind you have to pay taxes a lot of years before your fully in.
    "Intellect alone is useless in a fight...you can't even break a rule, how can you be expected to break bone" Khan Singh

  11. #11
    Canada sucks. I could never love a Canadian baby.
    "I'm not stuck in the trench, I'm maintaining my rating."

  12. #12
    This is a thing in the US too, but generally for the wealthy remember seeing a news story about rich Russians having their wives give birth in Miami hotels

    https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle...-a3628971.html
    Do I really look like a guy with a plan?

  13. #13
    I Don't Work Here Endus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freefolk View Post
    So you're saying a child born in Canada isn't automatically a citizen? If he shows up in Canada at the age of 18, he isn't automatically considered a citizen?
    There's a significant difference between "eligible for citizenship", and "actually a citizen". Many people don't want foreign citizenships. Or they live in countries that don't allow dual citizenship. Such as Japan. Japanese parents on vacation in Canada who have their baby here are not obliged to put their child's Japanese citizenship at risk because of a Canadian citizenship they don't want is foisted upon their child.

    If that child later tries to emigrate to Canada, they can apply for that citizenship then, but it's a process.

    In America, if you're born here, you're a citizen. You never need to file for citizenship.
    Seriously, this isn't true. You're automatically eligible to be a citizen, but the USA does not cause international incidents by forcibly citizenizing foreign visitors who were given birth to on their soil, against the will of their parents.

  14. #14
    So many are doing that here in Europe. Take some of that burden Canada!
    [img][/img]

  15. #15
    "Citizenship" seems kind of outdated for 2019.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post

    Seriously, this isn't true. You're automatically eligible to be a citizen, but the USA does not cause international incidents by forcibly citizenizing foreign visitors who were given birth to on their soil, against the will of their parents.


    It is true. You're a citizen if you're born here. It's in the Constitution. If you choose never to exercise citizenship, that's fine.

    If you show up at the American border with an American birth certificate, they're going to let you in, no questions asked.
    .

    "This will be a fight against overwhelming odds from which survival cannot be expected. We will do what damage we can."

    -- Capt. Copeland

  17. #17
    The Undying Doctor Amadeus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    There's a significant difference between "eligible for citizenship", and "actually a citizen". Many people don't want foreign citizenships. Or they live in countries that don't allow dual citizenship. Such as Japan. Japanese parents on vacation in Canada who have their baby here are not obliged to put their child's Japanese citizenship at risk because of a Canadian citizenship they don't want is foisted upon their child.

    If that child later tries to emigrate to Canada, they can apply for that citizenship then, but it's a process.



    Seriously, this isn't true. You're automatically eligible to be a citizen, but the USA does not cause international incidents by forcibly citizenizing foreign visitors who were given birth to on their soil, against the will of their parents.
    Yeah many don’t want to pay the taxes they are obligated to pay either.

    As for having a child everything you said is spot on. However going through the process as a child is much faster than waiting. The thing is you still have to meet certain requirements like say for school. Such as have family taking the child in and demonstrate they can care for and support said child.

    The point being whether that’s in contrast or not to the U.S. meaning a child born in said country might be a Citizen but the parents don’t have to be recognized as such.

    So the idea of just having a child seems over simplifying it.
    Last edited by Doctor Amadeus; 2019-05-18 at 04:19 PM.
    "Intellect alone is useless in a fight...you can't even break a rule, how can you be expected to break bone" Khan Singh

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    The article (and likely the brokers themselves) significantly underplay this thing.

    Yes, the child is eligible for Canadian citizenship. They have to ask; many don't.
    The child can't emigrate by themselves, and if the parents want to emigrate to Canada with their Canadian-citizen child, they'll need to qualify under the same measures as anyone else.
    The "free education" they pegged is the normal primary/secondary system. Cheap tuition is based on residency, not citizenship. So that gets more complicated.
    Applying to bring family over to Canada is not a guaranteed process, either. Though generally, when it's a country like China, we're pretty in favor of getting people into Canada.

    The problem with arguments against birth tourism is that any move against it also works against immigrants who want to stay and pursue citizenship; their children will not automatically be citizens, even if their parents secure landed immigrant status or citizenship themselves, not unless the children go through the same process as well, despite being born and raised in Canada their entire lives.

    Also, per the article, there were a whopping ~800 births to non-Canadians in British Columbia last year. And I'm willing to bet a lot of those aren't "birth tourism", but just how things happened. So I'm struggling to see a demographic issue.
    Over 800 births to non-Canadians in BC alone is not by happenstance. I can't remember how many it is nationally exactly but I believe the report was over 2500 a year, which is up from 4 or 5 years ago when it was only a couple of hundred at most. The fact that the advertising clearly exists means that it's being exploited. Frankly, I'm all for changing the rules so that at least one parent has to have permanent residency or citizenship in order for the child to be eligible for citizenship. Alternatively the other way that would also be pretty difficult to exploit would be to require that the child has to spend at least the first 10 years of their life in Canada in order to obtain citizenship. Otherwise, it shouldn't be a guarantee unless your parents are themselves citizens or residents of this country. The incentive needs to exist for people to stay to contribute to our economy, rather than buggering off for 18 years until their kid is eligible to sponsor them for citizenship, at which point their parents aren't contributing to the country, or they've built up the wealth that they don't need to work here.

    Congrats to the 11 fools who made the ignore list, your ignorance knows no bounds, bravo!

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by freefolk View Post
    I don't mind birth tourism.

    What do you think of birth tourism?
    What do the natives get out of it?

  20. #20
    Why would you go to Canada when its easier to have your child be born in the US? Its much closer, cheaper and you dont even need a visa. That ad is full of bs.
    Last edited by NED funded; 2019-05-18 at 08:10 PM.
    Your problem is that you’re more concerned about being precisely, factually, and semantically correct than about being morally right.

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