Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst
1
2
3
LastLast
  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Naramag View Post
    It depends on where you live really. I live in Hamburg, second biggest city in Germany. I do like to cook authentic, I search for recipes from around the world and try to find the most authentic. I can't afford to travel much, so that's my next best thing... learning about the cuisine of a country gives insight to so many things.
    Now, living in a busy harbor town with a lot of immigrants and such, you would think you can get everything anywhere. Truth is, I have to search a lot to find the right ingredients. And often I end up disappointed. And some things I could get, but the price wouldn't be reasonable. And that's in the second largest city in my country. Someone 100 Kilometers away in a small town would be lucky if the grocery there has more than one kind of soy sauce...
    Only one kind of soy sauce? Wtf?

    I live in https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falun and even swedish grocery store has several kinds of soy sauce. I counted 15 on a stores homepage.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Nymrohd View Post
    Honestly my complaint is that the supply chain exists, it's just underutilized. The Chinese make little effort to sell quality traditional products I guess. I am really hoping that with the new trade deal with Japan I'll be able to get my hands on more and more ingredients but it is very unlikely we will ever open our markets further to China, probably the reverse is true.

    One thing to be noted, China has like, EIGHT cooking traditions but because the majority of immigrants are from specific areas most people abroad only know of Sichuan and Guangdong cuisine which is a shame.
    What about thai stores? Thai store I go to have some Chinese, Japanese and Korean stuff too in addition.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Avskildhet View Post
    What about thai stores? Thai store I go to have some Chinese, Japanese and Korean stuff too in addition.
    No real Thai community in Athens that I know off.

  3. #23

    Chinese food

    Chinese food is the most protein intake food in the world. Diet like boiled egg is also very good to lose wait but just egg cant be the main source. You need to take some calories from food like chinese food and it has no fat.

    Thanks

    - - - Updated - - -

    Get this diet : Boiled egg diet.

  4. #24
    Thai. They fry everything in batter just like the English.

    I could eat deep fried shrimp in batter all day.

  5. #25
    Scarab Lord bungeebungee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dongbei, PRC
    Posts
    4,845
    Quote Originally Posted by DevilTrigger1989
    I just listed what I favorite most, for Shanxi and Shaanxi, their noodles series are brilliant. For Xinjiang, lamb and beef of high quality always make you gain weight rapidly.
    IIRC, you are fairly young and got hit with gout, is it possible you might be a bit more sensitive to those? I have friends with gout, so I realize that the red meat/gout issue is purines, but I don't know what other digestive issues might crop up and I think water retention may be an issue for some. As long as I run heavily towards meat I do alright, although I do tend towards lean meats and minimal carbs when possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nymrohd
    One thing to be noted, China has like, EIGHT cooking traditions but because the majority of immigrants are from specific areas most people abroad only know of Sichuan and Guangdong cuisine which is a shame.
    Fiancee 1 got her papers as a 5 star chef here. Eight is the traditional breakout, with several other strong contenders outside of those. I would guess that most will recognize province quicker than the classic cuisine name though -- for example Shandong instead of Lu. For anyone else who may be wondering what the hell I'm going on about here is a quick link with a map and descriptions: https://www.chinahighlights.com/trav...ht-cuisine.htm

    It looks like I may need to get used to Henan (Yu) food at some point in the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nymrohd
    If they can sell mirin, they can sell Fujian red vinegar, the demand will be there.
    In fairness, mirin is more widely used in Japanese cooking, whereas Fujian red vinegar is rather specific. Some things that are more regional, particularly when it comes to higher quality versions, are pretty limited in supply. I don't think that the major local chains for Fujian food in Beijing use much of the stuff and while I'm sure I could get it online, it isn't something I recall running across in my normal shopping.
    "No one -- however smart, however well-educated, however experienced -- is the suppository of all wisdom"

    Quote Originally Posted by Katie N
    Wtf? No weapons? xD What is this? Restricted training environment?
    Commenting on "anything goes" for martial arts and self defense

  6. #26
    The Unstoppable Force breadisfunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    flying the exodar...into the sun.
    Posts
    23,995
    Quote Originally Posted by bungeebungee View Post
    Vietnamese food: I'm guilty of aggravated stereotype. I can't say that I've found any I dislike but the dishes I know are limited. Sigh, yes, I admit to liking banh mi, goi cuon, and having a particular weakness for cha gio. Back when I was in the Army, I went in after the Vietnam war but close enough on its heels that senior officers and NCOs had usually been in it. In one office they would make a trip every month or two to a small place they felt stayed authentic. As the junior guy, I'd get hauled along and went with whatever they were ordering. The major had been a Ranger and would dust off his Vietnamese to chat with the staff and order.

    Cantonese food: One of my old assistants was Cantonese. She knew that I had a fondness for some things like Cantonese roast meats, but that there were things I hadn't tried. She missed Cantonese food, so we'd make an outing 2-3 times a month to a place near campus. I loved the roasted goose and we'd always get clay pot rice, whatever else came down to who was eating with us (often a couple of her friends would join us) and what they missed most. I can never remember what to call it, but there was a dish (not particularly spicy) with lots of dried peppers, garlic, and one form of fried meat or another.

    Sichuan food: Another assistant was from Sichuan and very picky about Sichuan restaurants here in Beijing. We would make the occasional trip to the restaurant run by the provincial government for a good meal, but once a month or so we'd try other places. The duck blood (by itself or with eel and other ingredients) is a longstanding favorite of mine, as are the smoked duck, the very soft tofu served in a bowl, bullfrog, and pickled vegetables. Hmm, when my stomach recovers from the hospital and I can eat spicy food again, duck blood and pao cai will be worth searching out.


    Image is Sichuan maoxuewang

    @DevilTrigger1989 Not meaning to derail or hijack your thread, but have you tried stuff from some of the other provinces such as Shanxi, Shaanxi (not the same as the other), Gansu, or Xinjiang? Those are all regular favorites of mine, and of course real Hunan food too.
    that looks really good. now im hungry for that.
    we have a decent sized hmong community here.
    also punjabi cuisine is best cuisine.
    Last edited by breadisfunny; 2019-06-18 at 12:53 PM.
    r.i.p. alleria. 1997-2017. blizzard ruined alleria forever. blizz assassinated alleria's character and appearance.
    i will never forgive you for this blizzard.

  7. #27
    I like all the Asian foods, except for the weird stuff. Not so much here, but in California, in the big cities you can get really, really good Asian food of all types.

    I consider Indian food Asian as well.
    .

    "This will be a fight against overwhelming odds from which survival cannot be expected. We will do what damage we can."

    -- Capt. Copeland

  8. #28
    Scarab Lord bungeebungee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dongbei, PRC
    Posts
    4,845
    Quote Originally Posted by breadisfunny
    also punjabi cuisine is best cuisine.
    I'm not really one for hierarchy, so I don't really do "best". I certainly like Punjabi though and wish the Indian and Pakistani food here wasn't so blasted expensive when one can find it, and unhelpfully hard to find most of the time. My middle daughter is one of the queens of online shopping and she turned the Chinese internet inside out trying to find this stuff for me:

    The closest she could get was "Mother's":

    and a Pakistani friend stocked me up on "National"
    "No one -- however smart, however well-educated, however experienced -- is the suppository of all wisdom"

    Quote Originally Posted by Katie N
    Wtf? No weapons? xD What is this? Restricted training environment?
    Commenting on "anything goes" for martial arts and self defense

  9. #29
    "Which Chinese food do you like better: Vietnamese or Mongolian BBQ?"

    First page of this damn thread, lmao

  10. #30
    The Unstoppable Force breadisfunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    flying the exodar...into the sun.
    Posts
    23,995
    Quote Originally Posted by KLOCKWERK View Post
    "Which Chinese food do you like better: Vietnamese or Mongolian BBQ?"

    First page of this damn thread, lmao
    we have a mongolian restaurant place around here. never been there but i heard it's pretty good.
    r.i.p. alleria. 1997-2017. blizzard ruined alleria forever. blizz assassinated alleria's character and appearance.
    i will never forgive you for this blizzard.

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by DevilTrigger1989 View Post
    Having visit loads of restaurant and try homemade for yrs, I tend to love several dishes with them
    Chinese:
    Canton style: Roasted Duck in Guangdong style, Fried Pork with Pineapple.
    Sichuan style: Chongqing style boiled blood curd,poached sliced beef in hot chili oil.

    Vietnamese:Beef on Rice Noodles (Bun Bo Nam Bo) series,Pork on Thick Noodles (Cao Lau)series.

    What about you guys?
    Have you ever been to China? I think the Chinese food in the states is not as good as the original stuff here. My favorite Chinese food is sweet and sour pork. *tang cu liji*
    I do put Mexican food above Chinese food tho. Amen for Mexican food *no, i'm not talkin bout Taco Bell and fast food places...however they can be yummy if you live in a country with very few Mexican food choices*
    The hunter hoe with the least beloe.

  12. #32
    Moderator Rozz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    1,873
    I love Vietnamese food! It probably has some of the best flavor combinations I've ever tasted
    Moderator of the General Off-Topic, Politics, Lore, and RP Forums
    "If you have any concerns, let me know via PM. I'll do my best to assist you."

  13. #33
    The Patient DevilTrigger1989's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Jasmond, Newcastle upon Tyne
    Posts
    326
    Quote Originally Posted by KLOCKWERK View Post
    "Which Chinese food do you like better: Vietnamese or Mongolian BBQ?"

    First page of this damn thread, lmao
    Just a discussion, mate~

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Muajin76 View Post
    Have you ever been to China? I think the Chinese food in the states is not as good as the original stuff here. My favorite Chinese food is sweet and sour pork. *tang cu liji*
    I do put Mexican food above Chinese food tho. Amen for Mexican food *no, i'm not talkin bout Taco Bell and fast food places...however they can be yummy if you live in a country with very few Mexican food choices*
    In fact, there are many more sweet and sour dishes such as ribs and sliced fish, you can find it~

  14. #34
    Scarab Lord bungeebungee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dongbei, PRC
    Posts
    4,845
    Quote Originally Posted by KLOCKWERK
    "Which Chinese food do you like better: Vietnamese or Mongolian BBQ?"
    That's easy, Mongolian BBQ!

    It goes back to the 1950s and was created in Taiwan by a guy who fled from Beijing. Story goes that he wanted to call it Beijing BBQ but didn't because of the political climate.

    Quote Originally Posted by breadisfunny
    we have a mongolian restaurant place around here.
    I'm rather fond of Mongolian food, even more so if it is accompanied by Mongolian booze.

    If it is "Mongolian BBQ" as described above it isn't Mongolian, but enjoy it for what it is - a bit of show, a lot of food, and a chance to play around with different ways to have things cooked in the sauces.
    "No one -- however smart, however well-educated, however experienced -- is the suppository of all wisdom"

    Quote Originally Posted by Katie N
    Wtf? No weapons? xD What is this? Restricted training environment?
    Commenting on "anything goes" for martial arts and self defense

  15. #35
    Brewmaster Dwarfhamster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    A plastic cage
    Posts
    1,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Stelio Kontos View Post
    Whichever dishes don't have onions.

    The Devil's apple.
    You, sir, are the devil's offspring, the spawn from between Lucifer's soiled loins.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I heard Xinjiang has the best pork dishes!


    (That was a joke.)

  16. #36
    To be fair, Vietnamese cuisine is strongly influenced by Chinese cuisine, especially medicinal cuisine. It's pretty much medicinal cuisine with slightly different ingredients.

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by bungeebungee View Post
    That's easy, Mongolian BBQ!

    It goes back to the 1950s and was created in Taiwan by a guy who fled from Beijing. Story goes that he wanted to call it Beijing BBQ but didn't because of the political climate.



    I'm rather fond of Mongolian food, even more so if it is accompanied by Mongolian booze.

    If it is "Mongolian BBQ" as described above it isn't Mongolian, but enjoy it for what it is - a bit of show, a lot of food, and a chance to play around with different ways to have things cooked in the sauces.
    When I was visiting Mongolia I ate mutton just about every day. Boiled mutton for breakfast. Noodles with mutton for lunch with a side of buns stuffed with mutton. Mutton cooked in claypot for dinner with noodles and vegies cooked in mutton stock.

    Good thing I like mutton.

    Oh yeah. I think I might have had some horse and camel meat dishes also. A break from the mutton.

  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    When I was visiting Mongolia I ate mutton just about every day. Boiled mutton for breakfast. Noodles with mutton for lunch with a side of buns stuffed with mutton. Mutton cooked in claypot for dinner with noodles and vegies cooked in mutton stock.

    Good thing I like mutton.

    Oh yeah. I think I might have had some horse and camel meat dishes also. A break from the mutton.
    Don't they also have a lot of dairy?

  19. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Nymrohd View Post
    Don't they also have a lot of dairy?
    Yes. Yak's milk and butter are good. Fermented mare's milk is an acquired taste.

  20. #40
    I like duck. I tend to go to local Chinese resaturants to eat duck (generally plain old roast duck) because Hungarian eateries consider duck a specialty so either they do not have it or offer it at premium prices.

    For the Chinese, it's just another kind of meat.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •