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  1. #81
    Warchief DocSavageFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Joe View Post
    I don't see how adding someone to a witness list is worth pleading guilty and then in turn working with prosecution on other cases.

    Intimidation only really works if you are guilty.
    ...or can't afford the massive legal fees involved in fighting the government in court.

    The judge involved practically begged him to plead innocent. Hopefully, Flynn with be given a chance to revise his plea.
    "Never get on the bad side of small minded people who have a little power." - Evelyn (Gifted)

  2. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Shalcker View Post
    The added him to witness list to reinforce their willingness to indict him later.

    It was right there on WaPo at the time as blueprint of intimidation:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...512_story.html

    Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his team are no strangers to the practice of prosecutorial hardball. That skill may be coming into play once again if, as news reports indicate, the special counsel is turning his attention to former national security adviser Michael T. Flynn and Flynn's son Michael G. Flynn, who worked with his father's lobbying firm and was also involved in the Trump transition. The elder Flynn has long been thought to be in Mueller's sights, and CNN reported Wednesday that Flynn and his wife are worried about their son's legal exposure as well.

    If in fact prosecutors have built cases against both men, they now have a huge, juicy carrot to dangle in front of the elder Flynn: Plead guilty and testify against others, and we'll go easy on your son. Given the former national security adviser's prior positions with the Trump campaign and administration, that prospect has to make other potential targets of Mueller's inquiry extremely uneasy.

    Members of Mueller's team are very familiar with — and have not been shy about employing — the tactic of persuading a witness to cooperate in exchange for leniency toward a family member. His chief deputy is Andrew Weissmann, a career prosecutor with a reputation for aggressiveness. More than a decade ago, Weissmann served on and ultimately headed the Enron task force, the team of prosecutors charged with investigating the financial collapse of the huge energy corporation. Weissmann and the other Enron prosecutors wanted the cooperation of Andrew Fastow, Enron's former chief financial officer, whom they had indicted on dozens of federal charges. When prosecutors later added additional charges against Fastow, they also indicted a new defendant: Lea Fastow, Andrew's wife, who had also worked at Enron. With the felony charges pending against Lea Fastow, the couple faced the prospect of spending years in prison while their two young sons were raised by others.


    Intimidation has nothing to do with being guilty, especially in US system where defending yourself means constant drain to your money.

    Or perhaps you also think that people who confessed to Stalin's NKVD of being Japanese/German spies were obviously guilty too?
    So, an opinion article, is your source? That is it? Not surprising.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Astalnar View Post
    A lion doesn't concern itself with the opinion of sheep.



    What corruption? The case against Flynn exists only because he is not one of the warhawks. And it will end the same way Russia hoax did, and the same way the impeachment did. With Trump coming on top. Why? Because Trump's opponents refuse to take him seriously, and keep having this distorted picture of reality, where they believe everything they want is true regardless of facts. I love it, makes winning so much easiers.
    Wait, who is the lion in this equation? Because it certainly isn't Barr or Trump.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by DocSavageFan View Post
    ...or can't afford the massive legal fees involved in fighting the government in court.

    The judge involved practically begged him to plead innocent. Hopefully, Flynn with be given a chance to revise his plea.
    I hope he enjoys prison.

  3. #83
    Warchief DocSavageFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orbitus View Post
    I hope he enjoys prison.
    I highly doubt that he spends a day in prison.
    "Never get on the bad side of small minded people who have a little power." - Evelyn (Gifted)

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by Orbitus View Post
    So, an opinion article, is your source? That is it? Not surprising.
    It is quite well-sourced, and definitely fits with general approach of Mueller's team (with all their raids to various people in the case).

  5. #85
    The Insane Orange Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocSavageFan View Post
    ...or can't afford the massive legal fees involved in fighting the government in court.

    The judge involved practically begged him to plead innocent. Hopefully, Flynn with be given a chance to revise his plea.
    ah... poor semi/millionair can't afford a layer..... Yeah lets not try that BS shall we.
    I have a fan. Seems he was permabanned.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by DocSavageFan View Post
    I highly doubt that he spends a day in prison.
    If that were the case, he would have been over and done with a long time ago. But the judge told him, he better start cooperating, or he was going to get a lengthy sentence. And as far as we know, he didn't. Now that he is trying to pull this stunt, it won't be surprising if he does get a few years. There is some pretty substantial evidence against him, the planning of kidnapping someone can carry a pretty hefty sentence.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Shalcker View Post
    It is quite well-sourced, and definitely fits with general approach of Mueller's team (with all their raids to various people in the case).
    Not really. And that "source" was 3 years old.

  7. #87
    The Insane Orange Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shalcker View Post
    The added him to witness list to reinforce their willingness to indict him later.

    It was right there on WaPo at the time as blueprint of intimidation:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...512_story.html

    Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his team are no strangers to the practice of prosecutorial hardball. That skill may be coming into play once again if, as news reports indicate, the special counsel is turning his attention to former national security adviser Michael T. Flynn and Flynn's son Michael G. Flynn, who worked with his father's lobbying firm and was also involved in the Trump transition. The elder Flynn has long been thought to be in Mueller's sights, and CNN reported Wednesday that Flynn and his wife are worried about their son's legal exposure as well.

    If in fact prosecutors have built cases against both men, they now have a huge, juicy carrot to dangle in front of the elder Flynn: Plead guilty and testify against others, and we'll go easy on your son. Given the former national security adviser's prior positions with the Trump campaign and administration, that prospect has to make other potential targets of Mueller's inquiry extremely uneasy.

    Members of Mueller's team are very familiar with — and have not been shy about employing — the tactic of persuading a witness to cooperate in exchange for leniency toward a family member. His chief deputy is Andrew Weissmann, a career prosecutor with a reputation for aggressiveness. More than a decade ago, Weissmann served on and ultimately headed the Enron task force, the team of prosecutors charged with investigating the financial collapse of the huge energy corporation. Weissmann and the other Enron prosecutors wanted the cooperation of Andrew Fastow, Enron's former chief financial officer, whom they had indicted on dozens of federal charges. When prosecutors later added additional charges against Fastow, they also indicted a new defendant: Lea Fastow, Andrew's wife, who had also worked at Enron. With the felony charges pending against Lea Fastow, the couple faced the prospect of spending years in prison while their two young sons were raised by others.
    ...
    If anyone had any lingering doubts, the Fastow story is further evidence that these prosecutors don't play around. Hardball doesn't get much harder than showing a guy you're willing to jail his wife and effectively orphan his kids if he doesn't cooperate. Even the most hardened prosecutor might feel a slight twinge in the gut at the prospect of using a defendant's young children as leverage against him. But there is little doubt that Mueller's team will deploy whatever weapons it has to persuade the inquiry's targets to play ball.


    Intimidation has nothing to do with being guilty, especially in US system where defending yourself means constant drain to your money.

    Or perhaps you also think that people who confessed to Stalin's NKVD of being Japanese/German spies were obviously guilty too?

    Someone had to do something illegal or there is no way to "intimidate" him.

    And Russian legal system =/= American legal system
    I have a fan. Seems he was permabanned.

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by Astalnar View Post
    What corruption? The case against Flynn exists only because he is not one of the warhawks. And it will end the same way Russia hoax did, and the same way the impeachment did. With Trump coming on top. Why? Because Trump's opponents refuse to take him seriously, and keep having this distorted picture of reality, where they believe everything they want is true regardless of facts. I love it, makes winning so much easiers.
    He confessed turned and gave evidence to the FBI declared himself a foreign agent, I know you lot are detached from reality but in this case it's beyond your conspiracy theories.

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Joe View Post
    Someone had to do something illegal or there is no way to "intimidate" him.

    And Russian legal system =/= American legal system
    Yep, especially since we have known, since this opinion article has come out, that the judge told him he better cooperate, or he was going to be spending a long time in jail. This article is almost 3 years old, and we know the judge told him this at his first sentencing hearing where it was delayed.

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