View Poll Results: GD

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  • I have gaming disorder

    3 9.09%
  • I don't have gaming disorder

    11 33.33%
  • I used to have gaming disorder

    6 18.18%
  • I've never had gaming disorder

    16 48.48%
  • I'm worried about gaming disorder developing

    2 6.06%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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  1. #1

    Gaming Disorder (6C51)

    In recent years, gaming disorder, or video game addiction was added to the DSM-5 & ICD-10. I suffered through it for the greater majority of my life pertaining to WoW. Though I don't wish to share my whole experience now. I'd like to hear your story. This topic isn't mentioned enough..nor is mental health in general. In fact, it's still stigmatized due to some ungodly reason. It's an integral part of a being's overall health. I have a series of questions for you...

    Do you think you have a gaming disorder, are you worried about one developing, and when did you think your disorder started?
    What are you missing in your life to where this addiction is necessary? (Why do you think you have gaming disorder?)
    How has video game addiction affected your life and how has it continually done so?
    Do you wish to end your gaming addiction?
    Have you known anybody who's been affected by this disorder?







    https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-...nternet-gaming
    https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/...me-addiction#1
    Last edited by CcB; 2020-10-18 at 10:40 PM.

  2. #2
    Brewmaster khazmodan's Avatar
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    In that first article they say that the DSM only defines gambling as a behavioral disorder but gaming uses so many gambling techniques, like every time a piece of gear drops and you can get something great or something useless. This is a real disorder but there is so much money being thrown around by the gaming companies to influence law and public opinion that it may take another 20 years to recognize the problem. By the way, this thread will be closed soon for...reasons you can imagine...

  3. #3
    gaming disorder is another name for addiction to entertainment (if video games wouldn't exist the person will escape its responsibilities by watching netflix, watching movies, youtube, browsing endlessly, casino, sex, or whatever would be the replacement)

  4. #4
    The Unstoppable Force Super Kami Dende's Avatar
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    I don't think Gaming Disorder is a real thing and it is just something people with shitty life choices use to explain why they are so lazy.

  5. #5
    I'm the other way around - gaming is how I cope with my mental illness, WoW has literally kept me alive.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Super Kami Dende View Post
    I don't think Gaming Disorder is a real thing and it is just something people with shitty life choices use to explain why they are so lazy.
    Denying the science of addictions and coming out full on in attack mode ... my question is, what kind of disorder does that represent (science denial, personal attacks - sounds familiar).

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  6. #6
    I'm 100% addicted to video games, and I find it completely ridiculous to act like this is some serious disorder you can 'suffer from'. It makes it seem like you're at the mercy of your addiction and there's no way you could ever stop playing without professional treatment.

    The only thing video games are doing is that they are messing with your reward system. In the real world rewards usually come very delayed, while here you can get instant gratification. And that's all there is to it.

    Addiction usually has withdrawal symptom when you take the thing away. Have you seen what happens when you take the drugs away from a drug addict? They might even die. What happens when I take away your video games? I bet you become irritated for a week or two, and then you don't really care about it. Sorry, but I can't take "video game addiction" seriously. I'm playing way too much myself, and I'm willing to bet that 99% of these cases are just people that have nothing better to do.

  7. #7
    Gaming "disorder"? IDK, I'm probably addicted to playing video games, but I still wouldn't personally classify that as a disorder.

    I do have an autism disorder which primarily manifests in extreme introversion. That's not to say I don't enjoy socializing, but I'll literally struggle to keep my eyes open if I'm in a social situation with more than 3 people present for more than 1½ hours as it quickly drains me of any energy.

    I did however used to spend entirely too much money on gambling for skins using a pachinko game mode in Heroes of Newerth. Same with buying seasonal loot boxes in HotS. I no longer spend money frivolously on microtransactions though.
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    Yes i hate those sneaky account thieves that come to my house and steal my computer in order to steal some wow money! Those bastards! *shakes fist*

  8. #8
    Merely a Setback Queen of Hamsters's Avatar
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    I have literally used gaming as an escape from my neurological disorder and mental health issues coming from said disorder.

    I can stop playing say, WoW, and go do something else without experiencing withdrawal just fine despite having alcoholism/drug addiction run rampant throughout my family tree. Do I believe in the science? Yes, but I'd never place it on the same level as drug/alcohol addiction.

    Gambling might be closer, seeing as how some games can basically trap people into gambling-style monetary schemes. I was never one to fall for those neither as I grew up knowing the value of money and what not having it can lead to.
    Last edited by Queen of Hamsters; 2020-10-19 at 01:08 AM.
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  9. #9
    The Unstoppable Force Super Kami Dende's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    Denying the science of addictions and coming out full on in attack mode ... my question is, what kind of disorder does that represent (science denial, personal attacks - sounds familiar).
    I don't deny addiction. Addiction is something that's real, I've known plenty of legitimate addicts. I just don't think "addiction" to entertainment is something worth caring about. I can understand someone having a hard time breaking an addiction to a chemical substance. I just think People that claim to be addicted to Videogames to the point of deteriorating health have serious mental issues outside of the Videogames themselves or are just plain lazy and needing an excuse.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Masternap View Post
    I'm 100% addicted to video games, and I find it completely ridiculous to act like this is some serious disorder you can 'suffer from'. It makes it seem like you're at the mercy of your addiction and there's no way you could ever stop playing without professional treatment.

    The only thing video games are doing is that they are messing with your reward system. In the real world rewards usually come very delayed, while here you can get instant gratification. And that's all there is to it.

    Addiction usually has withdrawal symptom when you take the thing away. Have you seen what happens when you take the drugs away from a drug addict? They might even die. What happens when I take away your video games? I bet you become irritated for a week or two, and then you don't really care about it. Sorry, but I can't take "video game addiction" seriously. I'm playing way too much myself, and I'm willing to bet that 99% of these cases are just people that have nothing better to do.
    Playing games a lot/constantly != addicted. There's a very specific mental condition that happens when you're proper addicted, and you don't just "get irritated for a week or two". The effects are mental vs physical, so your body probably won't break down like with drugs, but you can absolutely suffer from things like psychotic breaks.
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    FruitySalad boy, this is a fantastic thread and is really going places. I just want to make sure I'm on page one of what is bound to be a long lasting and productive thread. It's amazing there are no other threads discussing the squish, as I'm confident you would have just posted in them if they did exist.

  11. #11
    So if I am addicted to video games then it must be filling a hole in my life...damn

    About 20 years ago I was coming back to my home town after studying abroad and found out that the majority of homes were burnt and my childhood friend got snatched up. I went to find her and on the way met a woman that knew my dad and a guy that was friends with the sheriff.

    We eventually got into the farm where my friend was held and we managed to bring her back with us. Then I found out my dad had a second life and was now a gangster and his friend used me to find him and the guy that helped me got shanked but the sheriff joined us just before we found out my friend was actually the child to an international tech company that was looking for her for the inheritance.

  12. #12
    Mechagnome AndyF1069's Avatar
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    In my life gaming has filled two different roles. In my current day to day life it fills the role of my go to hobby ahead of something such as television or reading when I am alone and have time to kill. Nothing more, nothing less.

    When I was in my teens it filled a different role. I was heavily depressed and didn't have a social life. I had few friends and was generally miserable. From the start of my day to the end of my day (or from the moment of getting home after school) I would be on my N64 or PS2 because there was nothing else for me and it was a true escape. When I was 13 I accidentally discovered an MMO called Tibia and it was fascinating. I had never played an MMO before and this game was extremely social. The bottom half of the screen was dedicated to chat systems including global chats, guild chats and private chats. Even in 2020 I think this chat system is the best of any game I've played. Tibia itself also has no level caps and a leaderboard system. The competition was never ending and the prestige for being a high level mattered. Because of how social the game was, everybody knew everybody and high levels were looked at in awe.

    For me I had suddenly found a form of social activity that I had been sorely missing at that point in my life, as well as a gameplay system in which I was always gaining by playing. I begun to make many friends and found myself eagerly anticipating when certain people would be coming online (plutonic friends and crushes I had). By the time I had turned 16 I had a PC all to myself and I had just left school. I wasn't working yet so I literally spent all my time on Tibia. I was dependent on it for my social stimulation as well as the addiction of grinding levels and competing for highscores. I was at a point that I felt if I wasn't online playing then I was missing out. This was 2005-2006 before social media and smart phones were a thing. This was the era in which MSN was the cool thing to be on to talk to friends, but I could be on MSN and Tibia at the same time, until I got made fun of for always being on MSN so I started hiding my online status. I preferred my online friends to my real friends.

    Man I feel weird admitting all of that, I've never really put it into words before. Once I started college things started to change. I eventually found myself in relationships and had a bare minimal social life, which was still better than before. Ironically it was giving World of Warcraft a try with a girlfriend that killed that feeling of "need" to be on Tibia and where I eventually settled into my gaming as my casual go to hobby. WoW was played for fun with people in my life, not for leaderboards or lack of social interaction. Social Media was emerging at this point and I was able to talk to friends (online friends and real life friends) outside of games and soon enough that "need" to be online on Tibia was entirely gone.

    So for a few years I was definitely addicted to Tibia and wasn't able to recognise it. Now gaming is something to pass the time when I literally have nothing else to do, rather than the only thing for me to do.

  13. #13
    Hard to explain. I wouldn't say I am an addict, but it is contradicting because I put on an old game yesterday as I haven't been playing any games and I missed them. So that is why it is contradicting. Last time I actually played a game was..July? So I am sure someone can analyze that however they want to.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Super Kami Dende View Post
    I don't deny addiction.
    You just DID deny addictions ... now you are denying you denied them.

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  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Super Kami Dende View Post
    I don't think Gaming Disorder is a real thing and it is just something people with shitty life choices use to explain why they are so lazy.
    More specifically, I think it's possible to get addicted to anything. Using gaming as an excuse is just as likely as any other popular activity. Gaming is just convenient because of being so widespread in this digital age of information.

    But to respond to the OPs request:

    I'd say that overall gaming has actually had a very positive impact on my life in many areas. Cognitive ability, critical thinking, reaction speed, problem solving, emotional capacity, and even probably helped me overcome a fair amount of social anxiety in my earlier years by providing a shared activity with other people.

    Maybe I'm just lucky. Maybe I had enough of a stable home life or something so that I was never pushed into addiction. Maybe I just don't have the type of personality that is prone to it.

    But I'd be curious to know more about the topic. Sit down with a psychologist who's not biased, and actually has a lot of familiarity with gaming in general.
    Last edited by SirCowdog; 2020-10-19 at 03:25 AM.

  16. #16
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    Not really, I been know to take extended breaks between gaming.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SirCowdog View Post
    More specifically, I think it's possible to get addicted to anything. Using gaming as an excuse is just as likely as any other popular activity. Gaming is just convenient because of being so widespread in this digital age of information.
    Pretty much this.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Super Kami Dende View Post
    I don't deny addiction. Addiction is something that's real, I've known plenty of legitimate addicts. I just don't think "addiction" to entertainment is something worth caring about. I can understand someone having a hard time breaking an addiction to a chemical substance. I just think People that claim to be addicted to Videogames to the point of deteriorating health have serious mental issues outside of the Videogames themselves or are just plain lazy and needing an excuse.
    No-one is saying that gaming disorder can't be caused by underlying issues, just like addictions to substances or gambling can often have a root cause. Gaming disorder is classified as someone having issues with at least 5 of the following within a year -

    Preoccupation with gaming
    Withdrawal symptoms when gaming is taken away or not possible (sadness, anxiety, irritability)
    Tolerance, the need to spend more time gaming to satisfy the urge
    Inability to reduce playing, unsuccessful attempts to quit gaming
    Giving up other activities, loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities due to gaming
    Continuing to game despite problems
    Deceiving family members or others about the amount of time spent on gaming
    The use of gaming to relieve negative moods, such as guilt or hopelessness
    Risk, having jeopardized or lost a job or relationship due to gaming
    When you say you don't believe in gaming disorder, do you mean you don't believe it is possible for someone to have issues like this?

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by schwarzkopf View Post
    I'm the other way around - gaming is how I cope with my mental illness, WoW has literally kept me alive.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Denying the science of addictions and coming out full on in attack mode ... my question is, what kind of disorder does that represent (science denial, personal attacks - sounds familiar).
    Why must you rely on WoW too keep you alive? Why not use something else..starting a family?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Masternap View Post
    I'm 100% addicted to video games, and I find it completely ridiculous to act like this is some serious disorder you can 'suffer from'. It makes it seem like you're at the mercy of your addiction and there's no way you could ever stop playing without professional treatment.

    The only thing video games are doing is that they are messing with your reward system. In the real world rewards usually come very delayed, while here you can get instant gratification. And that's all there is to it.

    Addiction usually has withdrawal symptom when you take the thing away. Have you seen what happens when you take the drugs away from a drug addict? They might even die. What happens when I take away your video games? I bet you become irritated for a week or two, and then you don't really care about it. Sorry, but I can't take "video game addiction" seriously. I'm playing way too much myself, and I'm willing to bet that 99% of these cases are just people that have nothing better to do.
    What do you gain from this addiction? Who benefits from it? Isn't there something better you can do to benefit your children, relatives, and the rest of the world than move numbers around?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Queen of Hamsters View Post
    I have literally used gaming as an escape from my neurological disorder and mental health issues coming from said disorder.

    I can stop playing say, WoW, and go do something else without experiencing withdrawal just fine despite having alcoholism/drug addiction run rampant throughout my family tree. Do I believe in the science? Yes, but I'd never place it on the same level as drug/alcohol addiction.

    Gambling might be closer, seeing as how some games can basically trap people into gambling-style monetary schemes. I was never one to fall for those neither as I grew up knowing the value of money and what not having it can lead to.
    Why haven't you tried every single method to treat the disorder and mental health issues?

  20. #20
    Titan Val the Moofia Boss's Avatar
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    "Gaming disorder" is a polite word for "I would rather play video games than do something else or the work I am supposed to do".

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