View Poll Results: Do you support universal health care? Why or why not?

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  • Yes

    143 87.20%
  • No

    15 9.15%
  • Other / I don't know / It's complicated

    6 3.66%
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  1. #441
    Quote Originally Posted by Witchblade77 View Post
    not every diabetic can afford even that much. having been in a situation like that, you basically ignore being sick for as long as you can, self medicate to the best of your ability when you cannot. it sucks
    I don't know how old you are or what misfortunes have befallen you in that time but if you're 40 in the UK and can't spare £50 a month you dun royally goofed somewhere along the line. Particularly if said £50 is for live saving medicine. But I've not lived that life, granted I'm being callous.
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    We can't pass the Magna Carta! That's socialism!
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    How can you NOT give anything a gun? Freedom? Liberty? Where are your Freeberties?

  2. #442
    Quote Originally Posted by AeneasBK View Post
    Huh. If I was diabetic I'd probably shell out the £50 a month for my insulin if the government wasn't going to. But I guess some people would just wait until they needed an amputation, I never thought about it like that.
    Sure if you live in the UK. if you live in the US its the difference between being homeless or having your insulin when the cost can be 500+
    Buh Byeeeeeeeeeeee !!

  3. #443
    Quote Originally Posted by AeneasBK View Post
    Huh. If I was diabetic I'd probably shell out the £50 a month for my insulin if the government wasn't going to. But I guess some people would just wait until they needed an amputation, I never thought about it like that.
    In the US, the average cost is nearly $6000 annually. $500/month.

    That gets into "Do I buy insulin or groceries this week?" territory.
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  4. #444
    Quote Originally Posted by Witchblade77 View Post

    consider WHY they might like it? (probably cause insurance companies that are making more profit then ever nowadays and they are some of the ones making campaign donations). universal healthcare is a whole other ball game.

    dismissing the kind of damage getting complacent can result in is a big part of the issue here. and to bring it back to polls, yes. every poll is biased. that's why you look at ALL of them, not just the ones that agree with you.

    in any case. I do appreciate this discussion with you. but at this point we are basically going in circles, so ... I'm going to hope for the best, but I've lived too long and seen to much to expect the best as any kind of given.
    Honestly the republican leadership secretly likes it because their voters do. They just need to appease the fringe nutbags who they need their votes by saying the hate it worse than hitler.

    Insurance company profit margins are in the historical average range, except for last year because of COVID. Of which might benefit them right now but in the future with the negative effects of tens of millions of people who ended up getting covid, it might not last.


    I would ask you to do something new then.

    How would you implement a new healthcare system/coverage/etc etc?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Antiganon View Post
    In the US, the average cost is nearly $6000 annually. $500/month.

    That gets into "Do I buy insulin or groceries this week?" territory.
    Which then brings you to the point if you do have a little $$ left over...... where "shit i only have enough money to buy crappy food since crappy food is cheaper and i can't afford the healthy food, fruit, etc etc"
    Buh Byeeeeeeeeeeee !!

  5. #445
    Quote Originally Posted by Antiganon View Post
    In the US, the average cost is nearly $6000 annually. $500/month.

    That gets into "Do I buy insulin or groceries this week?" territory.
    Okay, but is it absolutely certain that privatising some aspects of healthcare would lead to a 1000% increase in costs or is that a uniquely American issue? Could reforms in the states lead to insulin being available to diabetics at the cost it is to citizens elsewhere in the world, or is it going to be 6 grand a year and only ever increase?


    EDIT: The topic of the thread seems to be only to discuss this as it regards to USA, and I'm sorry for being so off topic, my original post was answering the thread title more than the first post.
    Last edited by AeneasBK; 2021-01-21 at 11:56 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mormolyce View Post
    We can't pass the Magna Carta! That's socialism!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poopymonster View Post
    How can you NOT give anything a gun? Freedom? Liberty? Where are your Freeberties?

  6. #446
    I Don't Work Here Endus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AeneasBK View Post
    Okay, but is it absolutely certain that privatising some aspects of healthcare would lead to a 1000% increase in costs or is that a uniquely American issue? Could reforms in the states lead to insulin being available to diabetics at the cost it is to citizens elsewhere in the world, or is it going to be 6 grand a year and only ever increase?


    EDIT: The topic of the thread seems to be only to discuss this as it regards to USA, and I'm sorry for being so off topic, my original post was answering the thread title more than the first post.
    Privatization leads to price increases because of one simple word.

    "Profit."

    Profit is, fundamentally, excess productivity that is bled out of the system for the benefit of those who own it. So, a hospital has to take in more money than it spends, so the hospital owners get returns on that investment. That raises prices over the non-profit alternative, directly.

    Then you add in insurance, who bump prices even further because they need to make profits. And pharmacorps. And medical supply companies. And staffing agencies. And paramedic services, if they're run separately. And so on. Every extra step takes another cut, and everyone involved is better off the higher the prices get.

    Except the customer who actually needs health care. They're fucked. The entire system is set up to predate on their suffering and lack of alternatives.

    Any for-profit system sees similar results, when it can minimize competition. Which health care naturally does, since when you've got a stab wound in your gut, you're not gonna shop around for a better price.

  7. #447
    Quote Originally Posted by Endus View Post
    Privatization leads to price increases because of one simple word.

    "Profit."
    Sure but it can also be regulated, no?

    "We know it costs X to make Y, so pull the other one if you try to charge Z for it" kind of thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mormolyce View Post
    We can't pass the Magna Carta! That's socialism!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poopymonster View Post
    How can you NOT give anything a gun? Freedom? Liberty? Where are your Freeberties?

  8. #448
    Quote Originally Posted by AeneasBK View Post
    Sure but it can also be regulated, no?
    It can be, but regulations are difficult and Republicans are "ideologically" (quotes because it's hardly a coherent ideology in the slightest) opposed to such regulations. Look at the ACA and the profit-caps put on insurance companies that have been ignored over the years, for example.

    And regulating private businesses to limit profits is treading closer and closer to "socialism" in the eyes of many, to boot.

    I'd love to go back to ye-olden days of flying where prices were the same (hell, you could even exchange tickets with other airlines) and airlines had to compete by offering better experiences and service. Instead of like, charging the same prices now, giving you less room, less storage, worse food, worse service, obnoxious passengers, no amenities, and shit that used to come for free is now a paid extra.

  9. #449
    Void Lord Elegiac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    It can be, but regulations are difficult and Republicans are "ideologically" (quotes because it's hardly a coherent ideology in the slightest) opposed to such regulations. Look at the ACA and the profit-caps put on insurance companies that have been ignored over the years, for example.

    And regulating private businesses to limit profits is treading closer and closer to "socialism" in the eyes of many, to boot.

    I'd love to go back to ye-olden days of flying where prices were the same (hell, you could even exchange tickets with other airlines) and airlines had to compete by offering better experiences and service. Instead of like, charging the same prices now, giving you less room, less storage, worse food, worse service, obnoxious passengers, no amenities, and shit that used to come for free is now a paid extra.
    Reminder that if companies like Apple were worker cooperatives each employee would have an annual income of nearly half a million dollars.

    This idea that furnishing the profit motive with carte blanche enriches everyone is blatant nonsense; crony capitalism might as well be economic anarchy.
    "Multiculturalism has failed!" angrily types a person of European descent living in the Americas in a Germanic language using Roman characters on a device coded with Arabic numerals before leaving in a huff to go watch cartoons made in Japan.

  10. #450
    Quote Originally Posted by BeepBoo View Post
    Where in there does it say "Takes action to help someone because you feel bad for them?" Nowhere. Again, I can understand and feel the way someone does without wanting to do anything about it.


    Because insurance isn't (or shouldn't be) mandatory. Insurance should work like the personal coverage portion of comprehensive car insurance, like it did before the ACA.
    wait, in US car's insurance isnt mandatory? you can actually do an incident and be too poor/scumbag to repay the victims?
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  11. #451
    Void Lord Elegiac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omeomorfismo View Post
    wait, in US car's insurance isnt mandatory? you can actually do an incident and be too poor/scumbag to repay the victims?
    Car insurance in some form is a legal requirement in pretty much every state except New Hampshire, which still requires drivers to be able to prove they can pay for liability out of pocket before they issue a license in most cases - so no.

    The anarchist wet dream he's describing exists only in the heads of a few libertarians. Or eaten by bears because the political philosophy of personal responsibility is too lazy to pick up their garbage.
    Last edited by Elegiac; 2021-01-22 at 12:16 AM.
    "Multiculturalism has failed!" angrily types a person of European descent living in the Americas in a Germanic language using Roman characters on a device coded with Arabic numerals before leaving in a huff to go watch cartoons made in Japan.

  12. #452
    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiac View Post
    Reminder that if companies like Apple were worker cooperatives each employee would have an annual income of nearly half a million dollars.

    This idea that furnishing the profit motive with carte blanche enriches everyone is blatant nonsense; crony capitalism might as well be economic anarchy.
    https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman...doing-now.html

    Yep, and the company that made headlines a while back by making $70K/year the minimum wage has not only managed to survive, despite the endless predictions of immediate closure, but it's thriving. And their employees are makin lots of babies, too.

    WHICH IS A LONG WAY OF SAYING that the for-profit driven motivation of insurance companies is bullshit and drives up the costs pointlessly, and I don't know why anyone would argue otherwise. Especially when you look at the efficiency of the Medicare program, which has around a 2% administrative cost compared to the 12-17% for private insurance - https://www.politifact.com/factcheck...e-insurance-a/

  13. #453
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman...doing-now.html

    Yep, and the company that made headlines a while back by making $70K/year the minimum wage has not only managed to survive, despite the endless predictions of immediate closure, but it's thriving. And their employees are makin lots of babies, too.

    WHICH IS A LONG WAY OF SAYING that the for-profit driven motivation of insurance companies is bullshit and drives up the costs pointlessly, and I don't know why anyone would argue otherwise. Especially when you look at the efficiency of the Medicare program, which has around a 2% administrative cost compared to the 12-17% for private insurance - https://www.politifact.com/factcheck...e-insurance-a/
    Well the 2% is a gamed number, its more than triple that number in reality.

    Also the administrative cost % is skewed in favor of Medicare because their cost per claim is substantially higher than private insurance because of the population that Medicare covers (elderly). i.e they get a lot less claims per member but the claims are huge in relative terms then the average for the private sector, which equates to much lower administrative cost.


    Of course a lot of this growth in administrative cost is because of the growth in Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Drug plans.



    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/15/u...ive-costs.html
    https://www.heritage.org/medicare/co...-or-efficiency

    the actual cost is higher because of services performed for Medicare by other parts of the government that aren’t accounted for:
    The Social Security Administration collects premiums
    the Internal Revenue Service collects taxes for the program
    the F.B.I. provides fraud prevention services
    and at least seven other federal agencies and departments also do work that benefits Medicare.

    National Health Expenditure data shows both the government’s administrative costs for Medicare and those of Medicare’s private plans. Putting them together for the most recent year available (2016), they reach $47 billion, or 7 percent of total Medicare spending — well above the administrative costs borne directly by the Medicare program.

    Medicare’s private drug benefit plans incur administrative costs that are about 11 percent of their spending. All of this additional, private administrative cost is paid for by taxpayers and, through their premiums, people who use Medicare



    Still way better than the 12-17% born by private insurance but you ain't going to save that much going to a medicare for all system as you would going to a universal system like Canada
    Last edited by Zan15; 2021-01-22 at 12:45 AM.
    Buh Byeeeeeeeeeeee !!

  14. #454
    Quote Originally Posted by Zan15 View Post
    Still way better than the 12-17% born by private insurance but you ain't going to save that much going to a medicare for all system as you would going to a universal system like Canada
    Erm...M4A is a universal system though...or have progressive been misleading us all this time and I've been wrong too?

    And your links are...not entirely backing you. The Heritage Foundation ain't a great one to begin with given the hardcore conservative skew, and the NYT article includes this gem -

    The claim that these administrative costs are overlooked is false. As annual reporting of Medicare’s finances plainly states, they are accounted for.
    Which links to this - https://theincidentaleconomist.com/w...tive-cost-ctd/

    A look at Table III.B1 on page 51 of the 2012 Trustees report (PDF) shows the amounts Medicare does reimburse the Treasury (IRS), SSA, and HHS for administrative expenses pertaining to Part A. Other tables later in the report do the same for other parts of the program (see comments to this post). I suppose the charge could be that there are still other administrative costs that are provided by one or several of these agencies for which Medicare does not reimburse. If so, I’d l like to know exactly what the Trustees are missing in their report. Right now, my best hypothesis is “nothing.” Solid evidence would be necessary to convince me otherwise.
    What would happen to those private Medicare/Drug plans though is an unknown. Whether the government would continue to offer them or whether they would leave additional private insurance to the realm of...well, the private insurance companies if there are any left, is an open question.

    Though it's worth noting with those programs like Part C, those are Medicare-administered private insurance plans so that's already more than a bit of a grey area.

    So Medicare proper still has incredibly low costs, well below even the 7% combined administrative costs when you include the Medicare-administered private insurance plans.
    Last edited by Edge-; 2021-01-22 at 12:59 AM.

  15. #455
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    Erm...M4A is a universal system though...or have progressive been misleading us all this time and I've been wrong too?

    And your links are...not entirely backing you. The Heritage Foundation ain't a great one to begin with given the hardcore conservative skew, and the NYT article includes this gem -
    Pretty sure they work in insurance. He just wants to make money bankrupting people who need healthcare.
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  16. #456
    Quote Originally Posted by omeomorfismo View Post
    wait, in US car's insurance isnt mandatory? you can actually do an incident and be too poor/scumbag to repay the victims?
    I was specifically talking about the comprehensive (meaning the part where the insurance company reimburses you if you wreck your own shit). Incidental insurance is mandatory basically everywhere. There isn't really a healthcare equivalent of incidental insurance, because that's usually covered in something else (like your auto insurance policy, where it covers medical bills others incur due to your mistakes).
    Last edited by BeepBoo; 2021-01-22 at 02:18 AM.

  17. #457
    Quote Originally Posted by AeneasBK View Post
    Okay, but is it absolutely certain that privatising some aspects of healthcare would lead to a 1000% increase in costs or is that a uniquely American issue? Could reforms in the states lead to insulin being available to diabetics at the cost it is to citizens elsewhere in the world, or is it going to be 6 grand a year and only ever increase?


    EDIT: The topic of the thread seems to be only to discuss this as it regards to USA, and I'm sorry for being so off topic, my original post was answering the thread title more than the first post.
    So long as healthcare is a for-profit enterprise in the US, Americans will continue to pay through the nose for services that cost pennies on the dollar in EU and Canada.

    The healthcare industry lobby is incredibly powerful and we'll funded and piecemeal attempts at regulation are not likely to go anywhere.

    The only real solution is to kill their golden goose. M4A does it quick, a public option does it slowly, but either way we need the profit motive eliminated from prescription drugs and medically necessary health services, or it's all for naught, just a different group of fatcats cashing a different percentage of the same checks.
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  18. #458
    Quote Originally Posted by Antiganon View Post
    So long as healthcare is a for-profit enterprise in the US, Americans will continue to pay through the nose for services that cost pennies on the dollar in EU and Canada.

    The healthcare industry lobby is incredibly powerful and we'll funded and piecemeal attempts at regulation are not likely to go anywhere.

    The only real solution is to kill their golden goose. M4A does it quick, a public option does it slowly, but either way we need the profit motive eliminated from prescription drugs and medically necessary health services, or it's all for naught, just a different group of fatcats cashing a different percentage of the same checks.
    well healthcare is also for profit in Canada and other countries.
    but those things are limited by price controls and regulations.

    Some specialist are making 600k+ in canada so there is still substancial profit to be had. They are also required to publicly release how much they made each year in their "blue book" releases.



    As far as the lobby is concerned, you could rally the other 90% of the non healthcare/insurance related companies out there and show them how much money they will save under a universal system. then you would completly crush them with lobby support from every other industry.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    Erm...M4A is a universal system though...or have progressive been misleading us all this time and I've been wrong too?

    And your links are...not entirely backing you. The Heritage Foundation ain't a great one to begin with given the hardcore conservative skew, and the NYT article includes this gem -



    Which links to this - https://theincidentaleconomist.com/w...tive-cost-ctd/



    What would happen to those private Medicare/Drug plans though is an unknown. Whether the government would continue to offer them or whether they would leave additional private insurance to the realm of...well, the private insurance companies if there are any left, is an open question.

    Though it's worth noting with those programs like Part C, those are Medicare-administered private insurance plans so that's already more than a bit of a grey area.

    So Medicare proper still has incredibly low costs, well below even the 7% combined administrative costs when you include the Medicare-administered private insurance plans.
    Heritage was just the easiest to link and easiest to understand. They are not always evil when adding up numbers. Their anaylsis was quite simple and straight forward using all of Medicare's numbers. If its not administrative expense then someone needs to explain where those billions went becuause its a lot of money that is being spent without a clear reason why.


    there are a dozen more from KKF to non partisan groups.

    Again if you adjust for the population that you are covering and the difference in cost for those patients the administrative cost are very misleading when it comes to Medicare.

    A Medicare for all would have 5x the number of claims at 1/3 the average charge of just the current medicare plan/population. Thus increasing cost substancially.

    Of course you don't need this at all with a canadian type system
    Buh Byeeeeeeeeeeee !!

  19. #459
    Quote Originally Posted by Zan15 View Post
    well healthcare is also for profit in Canada and other countries.
    but those things are limited by price controls and regulations.

    Some specialist are making 600k+ in canada so there is still substancial profit to be had. They are also required to publicly release how much they made each year in their "blue book" releases.



    As far as the lobby is concerned, you could rally the other 90% of the non healthcare/insurance related companies out there and show them how much money they will save under a universal system. then you would completly crush them with lobby support from every other industry.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Heritage was just the easiest to link and easiest to understand. They are not always evil when adding up numbers. Their anaylsis was quite simple and straight forward using all of Medicare's numbers. If its not administrative expense then someone needs to explain where those billions went becuause its a lot of money that is being spent without a clear reason why.


    there are a dozen more from KKF to non partisan groups.

    Again if you adjust for the population that you are covering and the difference in cost for those patients the administrative cost are very misleading when it comes to Medicare.

    A Medicare for all would have 5x the number of claims at 1/3 the average charge of just the current medicare plan/population. Thus increasing cost substancially.

    Of course you don't need this at all with a canadian type system
    Pretty sure @Endus will correct you, but from a quick Google 95% of Canadian healthcare is nonprofit, with the remaining 5% being mostly non covered services.

    Regarding Medicare costs, you would be eliminating the costs to process those same claims by private insurers, as well as eliminating any sort of in network/out of network cost differentials that make billing more complicated. You'd also standardize the billing system across everyone, rather than having a bunch of different companies all doing their own thing in their own way.

    There is no reasonable argument to be made that administering M4A would cost more than the current system.
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  20. #460
    I Don't Work Here Endus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zan15 View Post
    well healthcare is also for profit in Canada and other countries.
    but those things are limited by price controls and regulations.

    Some specialist are making 600k+ in canada so there is still substancial profit to be had. They are also required to publicly release how much they made each year in their "blue book" releases.
    Quote Originally Posted by Antiganon View Post
    Pretty sure @Endus will correct you, but from a quick Google 95% of Canadian healthcare is nonprofit, with the remaining 5% being mostly non covered services.
    Yep. Specialists still make high incomes, but their income is predicated on their work, not on a profit percentage. Salaries and such are not "profit".

    Hospitals are all non-profits here (at least, that I'm aware of, barring some weird niche case somewhere), and doctors clinics as well. The standard way billing is handled for clinics is that a patient visit has a set billing cost, as do services; the doctor doesn't set the price, they bill the provincial government according to the government's price lists. Those doctors can work longer hours and see more patients and thus make more money, but that's still not "profit". Plus, patients are perfectly entitled to change doctors whenever, so there's still competition, it's just competition based on quality of service rather than price.

    You get a few speciality clinics providing secondary services like physiotherapy or MRIs, who do both health services and for-profit services, but not in the core health services. If your doctor recommends an MRI or massage, you'll get it covered and you'll get an appointment time based on triage; if your doctor doesn't think physio is necessary but might help, you can pay for it yourself. And you're getting basically similar price points as the government would; prices for these things are way lower in Canada than the USA.

    There is no reasonable argument to be made that administering M4A would cost more than the current system.
    What people need to realize is that the cost impacts are going to be felt mostly by hospital administrations (not doctors and nurses), pharmacorps (not pharmacists), and particularly health insurance providers.

    Not taxpayers.

    The health insurance industry will be ravaged, but it's an industry that creates profit off human suffering, so seriously, fuck that industry in the ear.

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