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  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Aurrora View Post
    There's basically no difference to the paint's consistency if you're only dampening the brush, might as well be painting straight out of the pot. A two to one or one to one paint to water ratio will actually thin paint so you're not covering up detail while not affecting its opacity too much.
    are modeling paints already thinned though? at least from personal experience. a lot of people paint with regular art acrylics (me included, cause those damn modeling paints are ridiculously overpriced imo and you can get matte medium if shiny is not your thing) and you definitely need to thin those. but modeling paints are damn near airbrush consistency - might as well be inks. thinning them further to get a transparent wash that settles into crevices effect - yes. otherwise - unnecessary.

    usualy when you see those "thin your paints" memes, its about people using regular paints.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Witchblade77 View Post
    are modeling paints already thinned though? at least from personal experience. a lot of people paint with regular art acrylics (me included, cause those damn modeling paints are ridiculously overpriced imo and you can get matte medium if shiny is not your thing) and you definitely need to thin those. but modeling paints are damn near airbrush consistency - might as well be inks. thinning them further to get a transparent wash that settles into crevices effect - yes. otherwise - unnecessary.

    usualy when you see those "thin your paints" memes, its about people using regular paints.
    Most big brand modelling paints aren't pre-thinned. Saying otherwise makes me doubt you have touched any of them in a long time (Army Painter, Citadel/GW, Vallejo, Scale75). I think Reapers were pretty thin last time I touched them, but they were shit for coverage. The Monument hobbies Pro-Acryl ones are fairly thinned, but still not thin enough for 28/32mm scale imo.

  3. #43
    The Lightbringer zEmini's Avatar
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    I am no exper but it was a hobby i learned during Covid. Painting miniatures looks harder than it is unless you want to be super detailed.


    -You really only need Grey as a Primer. White and Black has there place however. I use Black for Armored units like Chaos Warriors and knights.

    -I would limit your colors to 3 (besides white and black) unless you really want that super detail.

    -Layer deepest part of your model first (such as skin) and work your ways out.

    -Dry Brushing. A very important step, this can add texture and lighting to certain parts of your mini.

    -After you are done with layering, pick a wash. These can be made by yourself by deluding a paint, or you can pay extra and buy your own. Most of the time I use tan washes, but colored washes can bring detail to armored units. This will add even more depth and shade to your characters.

    -High light certain parts of the model to make it stand out. This includes blood on swords, dotting the eyes (hardest part imo) and picking a light source. Washing and dry brushing can help with this too. A lot more of about this step can be found on the internet.

    -Finally, spray a varnish on your models. This will give them a layer of protection to prevent chipping. I normally use Matte and Satin, but Glossy is great for creating slimy creatures. varnish takes a long time to dry, let it set overnight.

    -If a model is broken, take advantage of it. Such as a Orc with a missing arm can be painted as severed. I find that these broken models turn out to be the best ones I paint.

    I have not painted in months so I am probably missing some things.
    Last edited by zEmini; 2021-12-22 at 06:48 PM.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Witchblade77 View Post
    are modeling paints already thinned though? at least from personal experience. a lot of people paint with regular art acrylics (me included, cause those damn modeling paints are ridiculously overpriced imo and you can get matte medium if shiny is not your thing) and you definitely need to thin those. but modeling paints are damn near airbrush consistency - might as well be inks. thinning them further to get a transparent wash that settles into crevices effect - yes. otherwise - unnecessary.

    usualy when you see those "thin your paints" memes, its about people using regular paints.
    Paint thickness varies by maker, Vallejo is thinner than Army Painter to me for instance. It also depends on how much paint you're going with. You can get droppers to more accurately measure your paint to water ratio, but a full brush of each should be similar enough if you're just trying for a look rather than some kind of painting competition. Too thin just means more coats really.

    There's also various forms of alternate types of paints, such as Contrast that have specific behaviors for minis.
    "I only feel two things Gary, nothing, and nothingness."

  5. #45
    I generally went for thinner rather than thicker paint. If it meant I needed 3 coats instead of 2, so be it, I'm not in a hurry. My first test project I barely thinned the paint and it looked pretty bad so I was perhaps overly cautious afterwards. I did notice metallic paints seemed to require a lot less water to look good. At least Citadel's Leadbelcher and Retributor Armor paints (gunmetal and golden, respectively) barely needed any water to look really nice to me, without obscuring any detail. I did find that I needed 3 coats to obscure the primer anyway, perhaps because I bought a black primer which I think ended up being a bit of a mistake for a beginner.

    Since we're here, anyone has a recommendation for a decent wet pallet? I tried to do a homemade one with parchment paper and wet towels but I always mess up and the pallet either ends up being too watery and thinning my paints a ton, or not enough and be pointless. I'm not looking to spend a ton, I use a dry pallet (primed with the one I used for the minis) and it works fine, but to hear some people talk wet pallets are literal perfection itself and I'm curious.

    Also, RE bases, I haven't dabbled too much in them so far. I got an asphalt-themed one with my set that I used and it's fine, but I wonder if I can mix it up with base colors to create decent, say, deserts, wastelands or the like. A guy at the store I bought my stuff swore that snowy bases are the best but we didn't talk enough that I knew how he achieved them, anyone has any ideas/experience?

    Oh, and while we're here, fire and fleshy bits (such as those on Possessed marines). My army has some of both but I haven't the foggiest clue how to properly paint those and what I saw on Youtube seemed more geared towards advanced users. Any tips would be much, much appreciated!
    It is all that is left unsaid upon which tragedies are built -Kreia

    The internet: where to every action is opposed an unequal overreaction.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    I did find that I needed 3 coats to obscure the primer anyway, perhaps because I bought a black primer which I think ended up being a bit of a mistake for a beginner.
    If you're doing black primer, you generally base coat another color over that to start, or zenithal (lighter color from above for a lit effect). I use contrast color paints as base over a light grey primer which is a different method than traditional, but you can still build up from there. For primer, I usually use Krylon Matte Glacier Grey spray paint, works good and color matches well with ghost grey vallejo or similar light greys of other folks.

    Since we're here, anyone has a recommendation for a decent wet pallet? I tried to do a homemade one with parchment paper and wet towels but I always mess up and the pallet either ends up being too watery and thinning my paints a ton, or not enough and be pointless. I'm not looking to spend a ton, I use a dry pallet (primed with the one I used for the minis) and it works fine, but to hear some people talk wet pallets are literal perfection itself and I'm curious.
    I use home made, parchment paper and Scotch Brite sponge clothes for the water. One of the advantages of using a wet pallet is not needing to water down as much and it'll stay wet for days, but then sometimes just dries out overnight. There's a lot of wet palets out there with a lot of promises, but I don't know how much they deliver.

    Also, RE bases, I haven't dabbled too much in them so far. I got an asphalt-themed one with my set that I used and it's fine, but I wonder if I can mix it up with base colors to create decent, say, deserts, wastelands or the like. A guy at the store I bought my stuff swore that snowy bases are the best but we didn't talk enough that I knew how he achieved them, anyone has any ideas/experience?
    I like using green stuff and green stuff rollers (or simple tricks like aluminum foil balled up to make rough ground) for bases, but you can get rocks at Home Depot (aquarium/ terrarium/ whatever) or vallejo makes earth texture stuff that's pretty cheap. I've also heard of paint/ spackle mixes working well, but not sure there. I've used the Citadel Valhallan blizzard or whatever for snowy basing, but I'm sure there's other things that are handy.

    Oh, and while we're here, fire and fleshy bits (such as those on Possessed marines). My army has some of both but I haven't the foggiest clue how to properly paint those and what I saw on Youtube seemed more geared towards advanced users. Any tips would be much, much appreciated!
    Easiest fire is light primer, with yellow contrast over that, then spots of orange contrast and red contrast and maybe some black contrast. Fleshy bits are harder depending on how much you want, detail wise.
    "I only feel two things Gary, nothing, and nothingness."

  7. #47
    I have friends that love the redgrass wet pallette, i just use a masterson sta-wet (with kitchen parchment paper)

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Svifnymr View Post
    If you're doing black primer, you generally base coat another color over that to start, or zenithal (lighter color from above for a lit effect). I use contrast color paints as base over a light grey primer which is a different method than traditional, but you can still build up from there. For primer, I usually use Krylon Matte Glacier Grey spray paint, works good and color matches well with ghost grey vallejo or similar light greys of other folks.


    I use home made, parchment paper and Scotch Brite sponge clothes for the water. One of the advantages of using a wet pallet is not needing to water down as much and it'll stay wet for days, but then sometimes just dries out overnight. There's a lot of wet palets out there with a lot of promises, but I don't know how much they deliver.


    I like using green stuff and green stuff rollers (or simple tricks like aluminum foil balled up to make rough ground) for bases, but you can get rocks at Home Depot (aquarium/ terrarium/ whatever) or vallejo makes earth texture stuff that's pretty cheap. I've also heard of paint/ spackle mixes working well, but not sure there. I've used the Citadel Valhallan blizzard or whatever for snowy basing, but I'm sure there's other things that are handy.


    Easiest fire is light primer, with yellow contrast over that, then spots of orange contrast and red contrast and maybe some black contrast. Fleshy bits are harder depending on how much you want, detail wise.
    I'm honestly considering getting a grey primer. Zenithal doesn't seem to achieve a look I like (I wants my chaosy boys to look gritty) and the black one's just kind of a pain. The base colors don't look very good until I drybrush the model and I always feel like I need another coat. It does help with already black areas so that's a plus, but still. And the black paint I have is also annoying to work with, it might just be I thin it too much however.

    I painted another model today and I think I got the balance now actually RE wet pallet. I still find it a bit inconvenient to mix vs a dry pallet personally but it does keep the paint wet which is indeed a plus. I spend a lot of time per model since I'm a beginner and the kit I chose probably wasn't the best idea in hindsight lol. All those Chaos Marines have loads of little doodads on their armor, Chaos iconography, and poses that make reaching some areas hard so I slip up constantly. I should probably have started with loyalists. Oh well, what's done is done and I wanted my Red Corsairs.

    For the base, I don't actually have a green color lol (yes I know blue and yellow can mix but still) and earthly textures would be more my jam. I tried mixing brown with the crackly base paint of my Citadel set and it doesn't look... that bad actually? I was surprised. But I should probably get a dedicated one, it's not like one pot is that expensive and I'd like to drybrush some of it on the models themselves, make the dust stick to the armor's feet. Cheers on the Citadel winter base, I'll check that one out.

    Hm, for fire, I don't have contrast paints on hand, mostly bases to be honest. I thought about a base coat of yellow and white, then orange then red. Or maybe go full fantasy and make the Master of Possession wield blue fire or whatever, that's Tzeentchy enough. For flesh, I'm not looking for extreme detail, just something that's not terrible to look at. My first reflex was mixing skin tone with red or purple and go from there but I'm not sure that won't just end up looking like a weird pink.

    Thanks for the tips all told, given me lots to think about!
    It is all that is left unsaid upon which tragedies are built -Kreia

    The internet: where to every action is opposed an unequal overreaction.

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post


    Also, RE bases, I haven't dabbled too much in them so far. I got an asphalt-themed one with my set that I used and it's fine, but I wonder if I can mix it up with base colors to create decent, say, deserts, wastelands or the like. A guy at the store I bought my stuff swore that snowy bases are the best but we didn't talk enough that I knew how he achieved them, anyone has any ideas/experience?
    For a quick and easy way to make snow you can use Baking soda and pva glue. You can either sprinkle the baking soda over the pva or mix the two together to make a paste and apply it to the base. The paste can start to yellow a bit over time so I find the first way works better. You can buy "snow" from GW or other places but I'd rather spend my money on other modelling supplies when Baking soda works fine for me, like you can buy tundra tufts which is frosty looking grass which goes well with snow bases.

    These are a couple of Christmas themed minis with Baking soda bases I recently finished, the pic isn't great so you can't see the snow all that well but hopefully you get the idea.


  10. #50
    Pandaren Monk wunksta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    I'm honestly considering getting a grey primer. Zenithal doesn't seem to achieve a look I like (I wants my chaosy boys to look gritty)
    From what I've seen, gritty paintjobs tend to be heavy on the details, like random imperfections like caked mud, scratches, chipped paint and oil/blood stains. Stuff like that seems to be extremely time intensive, just going over and over the paint, adding little layers that build up rather than the crisp edge lining that warhammer uses in their promo pictures. Wash, clean with mineral spirits then stippling the paint, repeat. The Grimdark Compendium youtube channel has some good guides.

  11. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeebs View Post
    Most big brand modelling paints aren't pre-thinned. Saying otherwise makes me doubt you have touched any of them in a long time (Army Painter, Citadel/GW, Vallejo, Scale75). I think Reapers were pretty thin last time I touched them, but they were shit for coverage. The Monument hobbies Pro-Acryl ones are fairly thinned, but still not thin enough for 28/32mm scale imo.
    not in the last few years, no. although, full admission, I tend to use my mini paints on home made wet palette and it tends to also make them liquidier by default as the water seeps through the parchment paper.

    Quote Originally Posted by Svifnymr View Post
    Paint thickness varies by maker, Vallejo is thinner than Army Painter to me for instance. It also depends on how much paint you're going with. You can get droppers to more accurately measure your paint to water ratio, but a full brush of each should be similar enough if you're just trying for a look rather than some kind of painting competition. Too thin just means more coats really.

    There's also various forms of alternate types of paints, such as Contrast that have specific behaviors for minis.
    interesting.

    honestly, ever since my fave local game shop moved locations (so no sharing pots or anything), I've been sticking to using my artists acrylics and those absolutely do need to be thinned, unless they are airbrush paints.

    incidentally, I stopped thinning with just water and started using "glycerin/alcohol/window cleaner/distilled water" brew. it tends to require fewer coats that way and I'm lazy and impatient, so fewer coats is nice :P

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    I'm honestly considering getting a grey primer. Zenithal doesn't seem to achieve a look I like (I wants my chaosy boys to look gritty) and the black one's just kind of a pain. The base colors don't look very good until I drybrush the model and I always feel like I need another coat. It does help with already black areas so that's a plus, but still. And the black paint I have is also annoying to work with, it might just be I thin it too much however.
    The advantage to black primer is if there's nooks you can't get to, they're just shadowed. I like the grey though, or a camo khaki spray paint for terrain.

    Have you tried washes? Citadel's Nuln Oil and Agrax Earthshade are great. Agrax Earthshade is a brownish tint that flows into the recesses and gives some depth and adds a bit of dirty-look depending on how/where you use it.


    For the base, I don't actually have a green color lol (yes I know blue and yellow can mix but still) and earthly textures would be more my jam.
    Green Stuff is a 2 part putty. You mix the yellow putty and the blue putty, then mold that to the appearance you want and it hardens over a few hours. The rollers have a pattern on them, say cobble stone or factory floor, so when you roll them over the putty it leaves being a cobblestone base that you then just paint brown or grey or whatever. Can get pricy though.

    Easier is the baking soda + glue, or cat litter, or small rocks. You just need to remember that sand will look like small rocks, and tiny chips of rocks look like large rocks, obviously. The Vallejo Earth texture is easy to use though.

    I tried mixing brown with the crackly base paint of my Citadel set and it doesn't look... that bad actually? I was surprised. But I should probably get a dedicated one, it's not like one pot is that expensive and I'd like to drybrush some of it on the models themselves, make the dust stick to the armor's feet. Cheers on the Citadel winter base, I'll check that one out.

    Hm, for fire, I don't have contrast paints on hand, mostly bases to be honest. I thought about a base coat of yellow and white, then orange then red. Or maybe go full fantasy and make the Master of Possession wield blue fire or whatever, that's Tzeentchy enough. For flesh, I'm not looking for extreme detail, just something that's not terrible to look at. My first reflex was mixing skin tone with red or purple and go from there but I'm not sure that won't just end up looking like a weird pink.

    Thanks for the tips all told, given me lots to think about!
    The main thing is how much you want to spend. I started with a Vallejo starter and then added some contrasts and replace stuff as needed, but other than large projects paints can last a long time. SO best to pick some colors that will give you good run. If you're going to be painting a lot of human flesh, a bottle of Darkoath Flesh Contrast over the grey will result in a decent flesh tone with some highs and lows due to the contrast qualities. MiniatureMarket.com or Gamenerdz.com has Vallejo paints for $3-4 a bottle, so a bottle of flesh paint (assuming you're getting other stuff too, shipping costs) and some wash is probably enough.

    Main thing starting out is to get something the way you want it, but not to worry about perfection. If you spend time trying to get it perfect, you're setting yourself up for frustration and if you DO get it very good, you'll die when it falls off a table and breaks...
    "I only feel two things Gary, nothing, and nothingness."

  13. #53
    Pandaren Monk wunksta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Svifnymr View Post
    Main thing starting out is to get something the way you want it, but not to worry about perfection. If you spend time trying to get it perfect, you're setting yourself up for frustration and if you DO get it very good, you'll die when it falls off a table and breaks...
    Yeah I think this is good advice. Like any artistic hobby, it won't be perfect the first time so it's more about quantity in the beginning and practicing basic techniques over and over. I'd say focus on developing one technique at a time until one can consistently get a mini painted that way. I think the warhammer promo pictures are a good goal to aim for, even if they aren't a preferred style. Once the minis are able to be consistently painted with that crisp and clean look, one can start adding a new technique and developing a unique style. But the basic skills of having nice uniform paint and lines is a useful skill that will go a long way.

    Of course, one could just mess around and learn from trial and error. I just prefer following a systematic guide for improving skills as that gives good benchmarks and goals.

  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Svifnymr View Post
    The advantage to black primer is if there's nooks you can't get to, they're just shadowed. I like the grey though, or a camo khaki spray paint for terrain.

    Have you tried washes? Citadel's Nuln Oil and Agrax Earthshade are great. Agrax Earthshade is a brownish tint that flows into the recesses and gives some depth and adds a bit of dirty-look depending on how/where you use it.



    Green Stuff is a 2 part putty. You mix the yellow putty and the blue putty, then mold that to the appearance you want and it hardens over a few hours. The rollers have a pattern on them, say cobble stone or factory floor, so when you roll them over the putty it leaves being a cobblestone base that you then just paint brown or grey or whatever. Can get pricy though.

    Easier is the baking soda + glue, or cat litter, or small rocks. You just need to remember that sand will look like small rocks, and tiny chips of rocks look like large rocks, obviously. The Vallejo Earth texture is easy to use though.

    I tried mixing brown with the crackly base paint of my Citadel set and it doesn't look... that bad actually? I was surprised. But I should probably get a dedicated one, it's not like one pot is that expensive and I'd like to drybrush some of it on the models themselves, make the dust stick to the armor's feet. Cheers on the Citadel winter base, I'll check that one out.



    The main thing is how much you want to spend. I started with a Vallejo starter and then added some contrasts and replace stuff as needed, but other than large projects paints can last a long time. SO best to pick some colors that will give you good run. If you're going to be painting a lot of human flesh, a bottle of Darkoath Flesh Contrast over the grey will result in a decent flesh tone with some highs and lows due to the contrast qualities. MiniatureMarket.com or Gamenerdz.com has Vallejo paints for $3-4 a bottle, so a bottle of flesh paint (assuming you're getting other stuff too, shipping costs) and some wash is probably enough.

    Main thing starting out is to get something the way you want it, but not to worry about perfection. If you spend time trying to get it perfect, you're setting yourself up for frustration and if you DO get it very good, you'll die when it falls off a table and breaks...
    I do have Agrax Earthshade and it does add quite a bit of gritty character. Sadly I somewhat overshot it on my first model but I was still quite happy with the result, and being a bit tamer with it afterwards enabled great results. I didn't use it on a couple models, I figured the Aspiring Champion would want a cleaner look for example. I'd like all my models to have a bit of unique character that way.

    I'll probably get a couple Vallejo bottles- earth, skin tone, a green, and couple more. Won't break the bank and it'll make my basing and other things easier. According to a friend a good skin tone mixed with red or purple can give some neat possessed flesh vibes.

    And I hear you regarding perfectionism. My first CSM took me close to 5 hours because I wanted all the little details perfect. I ended up giving up and going for "good enough" and haven't looked back since, not for the sake of saving time per say but for the sake of saving my patience and sanity. And I feel that my "good enough" was plenty anyway. Only thing I'm a bit salty about is not finding Red Corsairs transfers yet, my box came with other Legions. The same buddy I mentioned also started painting Primaris Marines and holy hell those seem miles easier than my Chaos boys, I really should have started there haha.

    Thanks to you and all for the tips. For funsies I'll leave a pic of my first completed Chaos Marine.

    It is all that is left unsaid upon which tragedies are built -Kreia

    The internet: where to every action is opposed an unequal overreaction.

  15. #55
    I think my favourite thing is painting faces. I just found this group pic I made a couple of years back for the faceyourart challenge that was going around at the time.


  16. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    And I hear you regarding perfectionism. My first CSM took me close to 5 hours because I wanted all the little details perfect. I ended up giving up and going for "good enough" and haven't looked back since, not for the sake of saving time per say but for the sake of saving my patience and sanity. And I feel that my "good enough" was plenty anyway. Only thing I'm a bit salty about is not finding Red Corsairs transfers yet, my box came with other Legions. The same buddy I mentioned also started painting Primaris Marines and holy hell those seem miles easier than my Chaos boys, I really should have started there haha.
    I was painting Infinity (from Corvus Belli) minis and driving myself crazy, and that's how I got into Warhammer Age of Sigmar. I bought into Seraphon, lizard men that ride dinosaurs. So fun, easy to paint, relaxing and they also smash faces in battle. Like space marines, you can do a couple colors and it'll look great, and then however much more you want to do, it'll improve things but not be mandatory. Plus, you're generally looking at them from 3-4 feet away on the table and no one will know for the most part.

    Thanks to you and all for the tips. For funsies I'll leave a pic of my first completed Chaos Marine.

    Looks good, I'm currently painting giant spiders for Age of Sigmar.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by caractacus View Post
    I think my favourite thing is painting faces. I just found this group pic I made a couple of years back for the faceyourart challenge that was going around at the time.
    Looks great, did you ever see the Squidmar video where he uses a camera to get high res look at the faces for painting?
    "I only feel two things Gary, nothing, and nothingness."

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Svifnymr View Post
    I was painting Infinity (from Corvus Belli) minis and driving myself crazy, and that's how I got into Warhammer Age of Sigmar. I bought into Seraphon, lizard men that ride dinosaurs. So fun, easy to paint, relaxing and they also smash faces in battle. Like space marines, you can do a couple colors and it'll look great, and then however much more you want to do, it'll improve things but not be mandatory. Plus, you're generally looking at them from 3-4 feet away on the table and no one will know for the most part.



    Looks good, I'm currently painting giant spiders for Age of Sigmar.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Looks great, did you ever see the Squidmar video where he uses a camera to get high res look at the faces for painting?
    I've painted a few infinity models, I started with aleph and also have the operation icestorm box set, those minis can be really intricate. Honestly I've never watched a squidmar video, I'm sure he's really cool but whenever I've seen thumbnails they always come across as a bit clickbaity, maybe I need to be a bit less judgemental.

    Actually I just remembered I have a pic of some of the Infinity Nomads I was working on, this was back in 2015 and I still haven't finished them!

    Last edited by caractacus; 2021-12-24 at 09:33 PM.

  18. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by caractacus View Post
    I think my favourite thing is painting faces. I just found this group pic I made a couple of years back for the faceyourart challenge that was going around at the time.

    I'd like to be good enough to do faces one day, it looks really challenging to not end up with a dopey expression. The one on the top right in particular looks great. Two of my models are Aspiring Champions with exposed faces (but with masks at least, my boys are COVID-conscious it seems!) and I'm already dreading doing that part. Should be fine but still.

    @Svifnymr Thanks! And indeed if I would paint one Fantasy/AoS army it would be the Lizards as well, they're one of my favorite races in Total War Warhammer. The other is Tomb Kings and well, they're just gone sadly but at least the dinosaurs riding bigger dinosaurs shooting lasers are still around. The current Saurus minis look a bit too coarse however if you ask me, they're showing their age compared to most of the current AoS and 40K lineup. One can say what one wills about Age of Sigmar but the minis often look amazing, so the old Fantasy 8th ed. ones often don't hold up.

    Still, the hobby's expensive enough without branching out into 2 games. I'll finish my CSM set, probably pick up some Loyalists afterwards, and that'll be enough painting to last me for quite a while. At some point I'd really like to do an Imperial Knight of my own. Maybe a Chaos one, who knows, that's a ways off but it looks like a great challenge and I already know I love the look of them.
    It is all that is left unsaid upon which tragedies are built -Kreia

    The internet: where to every action is opposed an unequal overreaction.

  19. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    I'd like to be good enough to do faces one day, it looks really challenging to not end up with a dopey expression. The one on the top right in particular looks great. Two of my models are Aspiring Champions with exposed faces (but with masks at least, my boys are COVID-conscious it seems!) and I'm already dreading doing that part. Should be fine but still.
    Well they can be hit and miss, but as long as you aren't afraid to try and you enjoy doing them they can be fun. I have the advantage of showing the ones that came out well but for everyone I'm proud of I have a dopey looking bug eyed one haha.

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by caractacus View Post
    I've painted a few infinity models, I started with aleph and also have the operation icestorm box set, those minis can be really intricate. Honestly I've never watched a squidmar video, I'm sure he's really cool but whenever I've seen thumbnails they always come across as a bit clickbaity, maybe I need to be a bit less judgemental.
    He's a friendly enough guy, but like a lot of them it's hard to judge the actual video content from the titles and thumbnails. This video is interesting because they take a super high res camera, so imagine painting the face via the screen that makes the head seem like it's a real head in size. It also picks out every single little flaw that may exist and highlight it. Way too much for me, but interesting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jastall View Post
    Thanks! And indeed if I would paint one Fantasy/AoS army it would be the Lizards as well, they're one of my favorite races in Total War Warhammer. The other is Tomb Kings and well, they're just gone sadly but at least the dinosaurs riding bigger dinosaurs shooting lasers are still around. The current Saurus minis look a bit too coarse however if you ask me, they're showing their age compared to most of the current AoS and 40K lineup. One can say what one wills about Age of Sigmar but the minis often look amazing, so the old Fantasy 8th ed. ones often don't hold up.
    The amusing thing is, I don't think the Fantasy minis were that great compared to minis of their day. In either case though, yeah the Saurus and Skinks are showing their age, and one of the key units (Salamanders, giant flame spewing lizards) is an old resin model that is absolutely horrid.

    I like the monsters though!


    Still, the hobby's expensive enough without branching out into 2 games. I'll finish my CSM set, probably pick up some Loyalists afterwards, and that'll be enough painting to last me for quite a while. At some point I'd really like to do an Imperial Knight of my own. Maybe a Chaos one, who knows, that's a ways off but it looks like a great challenge and I already know I love the look of them.
    Yeah, I've been branching out a bit much, but it depends on what games you play too. I love Infinity's minis, but no one plays it locally. 40k days at the local store are on days I work, and I enjoy AoS more anyway, so AoS is my main game. Though I do have some Necrons and Black Templars.
    "I only feel two things Gary, nothing, and nothingness."

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