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  1. #41
    No idea I have never rented other than a year of college but there was no line. I was smart and lived at home while I saved for my own home and helped my rents with their bills and then moved directly into my own home after saving 40K over like 3 years.
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  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by cubby View Post
    That's fascinating. Why is the wait so long? And this is in Sweden - is this situation typical for the larger cities in the whole country? Do more people buy than rent? And where are the people going who move out to open up a space for incoming renters?
    They build too little, which has been the case since the 90s. I just know the case for the three largest cities, Stockholm, Göteborg/Gothenburg and Malmö, but I've heard that even in the cities that are semi-big, like Jönköping, which got 140k inhabitants (yeye, I know that's a billage to you in other countries but here it's quite big!), it's still a few years for central flats.

    No idea how many people buy and how many people rent, but among my friends only one lives in a bought apartment, and that was because she got a 16 year older boyfriend who already owned it. I think it's quite common when you're 40+, but not in my age (31).

    I assume to bigger apartments, or they buy a house, because they either find someone or their family grows bigger and they need more space.

  3. #43
    The Undying Gehco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorensen View Post
    These all sound like the most made up problems. I know the USA has it's issues but at least finding a place to lives doesn't require a years long line.
    But it does if you can't afford it? If you can't maintain it?

    As well, for Denmark, if you are a homeless person and wish to reconnect with society and work, you are bumped high up the list thanks to the government.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Deathknightish View Post
    This sounds like private individuals resting out an apartment part of a bigger building, is this correct? It seems to be quite common outside of Sweden. I know Spain has that as well. We don't have private individuals owning specific apartments in a complex. Here, private means a private company who owns and runs a whole building.
    Nah, what you quoted was a statement to privates owning large buildings with multiple homes within or houses for rent. A private means a non-registered landlord, which most of the team means unsafe contracts, less service and bad maintenance.
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  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gehco View Post
    But it does if you can't afford it? If you can't maintain it?

    As well, for Denmark, if you are a homeless person and wish to reconnect with society and work, you are bumped high up the list thanks to the government.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Nah, what you quoted was a statement to privates owning large buildings with multiple homes within or houses for rent. A private means a non-registered landlord, which most of the team means unsafe contracts, less service and bad maintenance.
    If you are bumped up is that's why the line for anyone else can last year's?

    Why not build additional housing for everyone?
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  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Gehco View Post
    But it does if you can't afford it? If you can't maintain it?

    As well, for Denmark, if you are a homeless person and wish to reconnect with society and work, you are bumped high up the list thanks to the government.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Nah, what you quoted was a statement to privates owning large buildings with multiple homes within or houses for rent. A private means a non-registered landlord, which most of the team means unsafe contracts, less service and bad maintenance.
    Aha, I see!

  6. #46
    The Undying Gehco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorensen View Post
    If you are bumped up is that's why the line for anyone else can last year's?
    The wait time can be shortened on many factors, but people search for specific homes. There is a shorter wait on 2 bedroom apartments, while longer on 3 and 4 which is why families get bumped up the list on 3 and 4 bedroom apartments, 5 and 6 are short wait too but too expensive to live in for the average city family. Then it is down to location. If you wish to live in a big city, then you need to wait longer for you can't just build new homes there, if you wish to live in the outskirts, shorter wait and so on.

    Denmark's homeless population is VERY small compared to our population, and a grain of sand compared to the US.

    In 2019, there were 5.8 million people living in Denmark, out of that number, only 6.431 were homeless for various reasons. These numbers consist of people who have chosen to not be part of the main whole or chosen to be 'free'. You can't solve problems that do not wish to be solved though. And if these wish to be part of the society, they can go to the local office of where they are currently and request help to be housed and request benefits. They hardly take spots from the queue from others when there is thousands of housing queue listings.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sorensen View Post
    Why not build additional housing for everyone?
    This statement sounds really uncomfortable. Building new is not always the answer. Especially not when you are in a small country. As well, you have to remember, queues are made for people waiting for homes to be constructed too, or waiting to have money for it, or waiting for the place to be renovated.
    Last edited by Gehco; 2021-04-22 at 08:03 PM.
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  7. #47
    I've never heard of such wait. Here in Canada most renting is done privately, and when I got my last apartment it was literally a matter of days; I visited it on a Thurdsay, sent all the relevant info the following day and was signing my bail next Tuesday. I know there are some city-owned apartment but, to put it bluntly, most of them aren't the best you could find. I don't know what system is in place for these.

    Of course, the cost of rent is another matter. If you try to rent in Montreal, Toronto or Vancouver you won't necessarily have to wait long, but you will have to cough out the big bucks, and gentrification of districts pushing rent up is a real problem in all these cities.
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  8. #48
    I've never even heard of this. Where I live, you go looking, see if one has a vacancy now or anytime soon, if there's on available you could move in right away. Otherwise you just have to wait until there's a vacancy available which could be a few weeks or possibly months, but there's no "line" there's just a wait if there's no currently available units.

  9. #49
    Not that bad. I got approved by the Presidio really fast.


    But then I failed all of the roommate interviews. Because I was talking shit about hipsters and beer snobs.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by matheney2k View Post
    It was the 6th word of the OP for starters..
    The Thread question is "How-long-do-you-have-to-wait-in-line-for-a-rental-apartment-in-your-country"
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  11. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Amadeus View Post
    The Thread question is "How-long-do-you-have-to-wait-in-line-for-a-rental-apartment-in-your-country"
    The dude I quoted asked where people lived where they have to wait in line???

  12. #52
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  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubby View Post
    That's fascinating. Why is the wait so long? And this is in Sweden - is this situation typical for the larger cities in the whole country? Do more people buy than rent? And where are the people going who move out to open up a space for incoming renters?
    So, in the specific case of Stockholm the lines are long for several reasons.
    The biggest one is that lots of people keep places that they don't live in after moving to a better place, or away. Either they rent it out second hand or it sits empty with them visiting "enough" to not break contract of non-use. (Renting second hand in this way is illegal but people do it as most get away with it). They sit on them because one day they "might want to move back" or "the kids might one day need it". There is a large amount of technically empty rental apartments in stockholm that should go to new renters.

    So, I believe that people who live in appartments it's more common to rent than to own, even if I believe ownership has been going up the last twenty years. Single houses are far more common to own than to rent.

    As for how it works.
    There is a que, or in the case of Stockholm several.
    You sign up that you want a place. You put in some parameters. Size wishes, people, age. Then you wait.
    Everytime an apartment is empty you can put a request in. The number you are in the que (this is gross simplification, but look at it as "time here") is your number. If someone has a higher number, they are before you. Person with highest number has first pick. I believe they can refuse and they'll get a slight subtraction on their number for next time as it shows they aren't desperate. But if the number 1 person doesn't take it it goes to number 2, repeat until someone takes it. If you are number 4000 in the que it'll take a lot of refusals to trickle down.
    This is the basics.
    People who move out.
    Either move to a better rented place, because they signed right back up to the que as they got the place, which everyone in Stockholm does for that one day they might need it, or they move to someplace they bought. The idea is that people move to a small place, then when they become a family they move to a bigger place the smaller getting back to the market, then that permutates more as time goes on.
    But everyone stays in the que because that one amazing place might show up. And lots of people just sit on decent appartments because they might need them again.

    The second thing is how it works everywhere. But Stockholm has compounted issues. One, it isn't one municipality, it is several (imagine New York and it's boroughs, or London and the same). The partitions of "Stockholm" propper and what are technically subburbs can be very indistinct. So people can be in multiple ques that seem the same.
    But the answer to the "where do people move out to" is generally "other rented, but better, apartments".
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  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Deathknightish View Post
    Here in my city in Sweden you have to wait 6~ years just for the pleasure to live in the worst areas. 10-12 for the better ones. I managed to get an apartment through trading with another, but in the queue system where I've been standing for 7 years I'm in the kind of okay but still not-areas.

    In Stockholm it's worse. Then it's like 10 years for the worst and 20-25 for the central parts.

    Even in smaller cities I hear the waiting time is growing, to like 5 years for central parts.

    So parents put their kids in queue the moment they turn 18, and until they get their own apartment it's second hand renting through others, which they are only allowed to rent for a year before it's time for the next second hand apartment, or if they have rich parents the parents buy them one.
    That is really crazy. As has been said a couple times before, in the US it doesn't take long at all. Hell, the first apartment I moved into during university was a super cheap, 2 bedroom, rent controlled place and was only a 2 minute drive from campus. One would think that rent controlled apartment would be a bit harder to get, but nope. Moved in within a week, no problem. Was a fairly nice place too.

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by jonnysensible View Post
    what the fuck are you talking about?

    if i want to rent a place i go to the estate agent and go 'i want to rent this place' they do all the checks and take the piss with costs and then bosh 20 days or so later you are in the gaff
    I think he's talking about social and government owned housing or something?

    Else I'm entirely confused too.

  16. #56
    0 in Germany and i changed location 5 times already 3, times work related

    But i am also not obsessed to live in big cities like most people are and cant comprehend to live anywhere else because those are the only places where you cant find rent places that arent expensive

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Yas-Queen Rochana View Post
    I think he's talking about social and government owned housing or something?
    I checked: all rental apartments in Sweden are rent controlled (not only social and government owned housing) with low prices; so instead of paying higher rent people have to stand in queue (or find another solution). https://www.mortgagebrokers.ie/housi...europe-sweden/ https://theeconomicstandard.com/rent...erywhere-else/ or from the other side https://www.sverigesallmannytta.se/i...ing-in-sweden/

  18. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Forogil View Post
    I checked: all rental apartments in Sweden are rent controlled (not only social and government owned housing) with low prices; so instead of paying higher rent people have to stand in queue (or find another solution). https://www.mortgagebrokers.ie/housi...europe-sweden/ https://theeconomicstandard.com/rent...erywhere-else/ or from the other side https://www.sverigesallmannytta.se/i...ing-in-sweden/
    Sounds thus like there are plenty of available apartments, just that the extra administrative work and bureaucracy causes people having to wait forever, because government as usual is slow as fuck and incompetentefficient. Meanwhile small home-owners and beginning landlords are robbed from potential income(?), making it yet another market where the big companies and corporations receive an edge on small or beginning entrepreneurs.
    Last edited by Yas-Queen Rochana; 2021-04-23 at 12:23 PM.

  19. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Yas-Queen Rochana View Post
    Sounds thus like there are plenty of available apartments, just that the extra administrative work and bureaucracy causes people having to wait forever, because government as usual is slow as fuck and incompetentefficient. Meanwhile small home-owners and beginning landlords are robbed from potential income(?), making it yet another market where the big companies and corporations receive an edge on small or beginning entrepreneurs.
    They don't build enough, that's the main problem.

    We also don't have small home-owners and landlords, as it's not like in other countries where one person owns one apartment in one building who someone else owns and rents it out. Here, one renting company owns a whole building and rents out every apartment.

  20. #60
    Merely a Setback Sunseeker's Avatar
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    Wait times for "public housing", that is, apartments and homes owned by the HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) can be pretty long, depending on your area, the USA is a big place, so wait times vary and people with higher need (disabled, elderly, with children, etc...) can jump ahead in line. Otherwise there's always privately-owned rentals available, though they're often expensive for low quality.
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