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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Kagthul View Post
    Thats why I asked "what does he -actually- need?

    Like Jell repeated/pointed out, if you're just using basic productivity and email, a Chromebook will do you fine.

    And large enterprizes are getting into Chromebooks too, with VMWare (i believe it was VMWare, not the other major company that does VMs) supporting Windows VMs on Enterprise Chromebooks.

    But if all you're doing is daily-driving, content consumption, and basic Office suite apps (even MSes, since 365 is perfectly usable), a CHromebook is fine.
    I actually hadn't heard of that. What a weird solution. Wouldn't that still require a Windows license then, which kind of negates the advantage of the Chromebook? And I can't imagine that Windows in a VM is going to perform all that well, let alone how much additional storage that will need.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by jellmoo View Post
    I actually hadn't heard of that. What a weird solution. Wouldn't that still require a Windows license then, which kind of negates the advantage of the Chromebook? And I can't imagine that Windows in a VM is going to perform all that well, let alone how much additional storage that will need.
    Its not like a Windows license is expensive, especially for Enterprise clients who can buy blocks of hundreds or thousands of keys. As for performance.. its usualky native hardware (most Chromebooks that Enterprise is looking at are running Intel, usually i3s and i5s, so itd be fine for most enterprise apps which arent usually hardware punishing - just proprietary/Windows only.

    Enterprise customers arent buying 200$ Mediatek powered Chromebooks. Theyre spending money on higher-end SKUs (which are still cheaper than Windows machines) and are using ChromeOS for ease of management and IT support. (Enterprise ChromeOS can be managed remotely and en masse easily).

    - - - Updated - - -

    I was wrong, it was Parallels:

    https://www.parallels.com/products/desktop/chrome/

  3. #23
    Please wait Temp name's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegas82 View Post
    He already stretched that to $600. And it’s out. My friend got 2 back at the end of July.
    Okay, so if I go on their website right now, can I buy a laptop for 600 dollars?

    No.
    The cheapest one is 750. And that's a barebones without RAM. Or SSD. Or Wifi. Or OS.

    Okay, let's say he's willing to pay 750, and have the extra stuff to make the barebones actually work for no extra cost, can he buy it then?
    Sure, if he's willing to wait until November for it to ship.

    Okay, so what if he wants one now? Nope, too bad, none available. At all. His options are to buy a 1050/1500 barebones (again, without RAM/SSD/WiFi/OS), and to wait for that to ship in October. Or get the 1400/2000 variants that aren't barebones, and again wait until October before they ship


    Yes, the laptops exist, people have bought and received them, but they're not available, or again, within budget.
    And yes, I think they're a great company and what they're doing should be rewarded, but they aren't for everyone and shouldn't be brought up when they don't match what people need / want
    Last edited by Temp name; 2021-09-27 at 07:44 AM.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Kagthul View Post
    Its not like a Windows license is expensive, especially for Enterprise clients who can buy blocks of hundreds or thousands of keys. As for performance.. its usualky native hardware (most Chromebooks that Enterprise is looking at are running Intel, usually i3s and i5s, so itd be fine for most enterprise apps which arent usually hardware punishing - just proprietary/Windows only.

    Enterprise customers arent buying 200$ Mediatek powered Chromebooks. Theyre spending money on higher-end SKUs (which are still cheaper than Windows machines) and are using ChromeOS for ease of management and IT support. (Enterprise ChromeOS can be managed remotely and en masse easily).

    - - - Updated - - -

    I was wrong, it was Parallels:

    https://www.parallels.com/products/desktop/chrome/
    Huh... It still strikes me as a bit of a weird solution overall though. You still need to buy a high end Chromebook with an i5 or i7 and a minimum of 8GB of RAM, use a Windows license, pay $70/year per user for the software, and ultimately lose some of the ease of admin benefit of the Chromebook since your IT team still needs to support Windows which could prove troublesome since not all software loves running in a VM environment.

    I'm not saying it's a bad idea, I can see use cases for it and it's really cool to see solutions like this pop up, but it does seem like a lot of time and effort just to fin d workarounds to make the setup viable.

  5. #25
    A little late but consider getting an off-lease/refurbished business grade laptop like a Dell latitude/HP Elitebook/Lenovo Thinkpad/ Dell Precision etc. You can grab a nice Dell Latitude 5490 with an 8th gen i5/i7, 16GB RAM, and a 256GB SSD for the $400 range all day.

  6. #26
    Any kind of ThinkPad should work.

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