1. #7441
    BREAKING: The Supreme Court allows Idaho to enforce its strict abortion ban, even in medical emergencies
    https://twitter.com/AP/status/174339...IJpLh3l5A&s=19

    Give it to SCOTUS they are letting states eff themselves, err decide.

    Biden is going to appeal.

    Just to be clear: The Supreme Court will now be deciding TWO major abortion cases this term, involving access to medication abortion and the ability to obtain an emergency abortion at an ER. It seems the justices have not, in fact, removed themselves from the abortion debate.
    https://bsky.app/profile/mjsdc.bsky..../3kibckbuuon2m

    Didn't know these two were coming up. I guess the people who are in these states are effed. Another warning to people who can't even have an ER abortion.

    An ih btw what Idaho just eliminated.
    Last edited by Paranoid Android; 2024-01-05 at 11:29 PM.
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  2. #7442
    https://www.tampabay.com/news/florid...ed-parenthood/

    Well, it might be an issue put to Florida voters as well if Florida Republicans can't find a way to stop it ahead of time.

    Which makes me wonder how they're planning to undermine the results if they don't go the way they want, as Florida Republicans have done when voters passed ballot measures they disagreed with previously.

  3. #7443
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    https://www.tampabay.com/news/florid...ed-parenthood/

    Well, it might be an issue put to Florida voters as well if Florida Republicans can't find a way to stop it ahead of time.

    Which makes me wonder how they're planning to undermine the results if they don't go the way they want, as Florida Republicans have done when voters passed ballot measures they disagreed with previously.
    University of Florida Statewide poll in November 2023.



    It looks like if the amendment is on the ballot in 2024, it should win easily.

  4. #7444
    The Insane Masark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    University of Florida Statewide poll in November 2023.



    It looks like if the amendment is on the ballot in 2024, it should win easily.
    Not that easily. Florida requires 60% to pass amendments, not just 50%.

    Warning : Above post may contain snark and/or sarcasm. Try reparsing with the /s argument before replying.
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  5. #7445
    Quote Originally Posted by Masark View Post
    Not that easily. Florida requires 60% to pass amendments, not just 50%.
    That and lawmakers will likely ignore or mess up the ballot if it were to pass.

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  6. #7446
    Quote Originally Posted by Masark View Post
    Not that easily. Florida requires 60% to pass amendments, not just 50%.
    If the poll is accurate, 62% of voters are for the amendment, 29% against, and 9% don't know of refused to answer. If you ignore the 9%, 68% are for the amendment. Well above the 60% requirement.

    Even among GOP voters, 53% are for, 39% against, and 9% undecided. Therefore, approximately 57% of GOP voters are for the amendment.

    All the previous polls, if you take out the don't know, came out over 60% or very close to it.

    I think the chances are pretty good.

    Will the lawmakers honor the will of the voters? That's a different question.

  7. #7447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    Will the lawmakers honor the will of the voters? That's a different question.
    We all know the answer to that question.
    Princesses can kill knights to rescue dragons.

  8. #7448
    The statewide approach in getting guarantees that can maintain abortion access on the short or medium term are absolutely necessary; they save lives.
    But what I'd be afraid is if traditionally Republican voters that favour choice as defined by these local measures might be complacent and believe those are enough to guarantee their rights and will keep voting GOP otherwise. Yes back in 2022 there was an outcry but the repeal of Roe Vs Wade was fresh and voters may not have considered the efforts that Pro-Choice groups would, largely successfully, make to constrain anti-choice state laws by the GOP. Perhaps the effect of this completely unpopular decision will be blunted and people are overestimating its eventual effect on the 2024 elections.

  9. #7449
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...ncy-yeni-glick

    “Anything that fails in society, anything that’s broken, ends up being the emergency room’s problem,” one of the employees told me. Both of them suspected that the surge was being driven by diminished access to abortions, following the enactment, in 2021, of a state law known as S.B. 8, which banned the procedure after the sixth week of pregnancy in nearly all cases. A Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study recently showed that, in a nine-month period following the passage of S.B. 8, nearly ten thousand additional babies were born in Texas.

    What conservative lawmakers hailed as the saving of infant lives, medical professionals I interviewed in rural Texas saw as a beleaguering challenge. According to state data, even before S.B. 8 half the counties in Texas were unequipped to treat pregnant women, lacking a single specialist in women’s health, such as an ob-gyn or a certified midwife. Multiple doctors told me that the overturning of Roe v. Wade, in June of 2022, exacerbated the crisis, as practitioners retired early or moved to states where they’d have more liberty to make medical judgments. So who, exactly, was supposed to handle the extra deliveries in women’s-health deserts such as Caldwell County? What would become of women in remote locales who experienced a hemorrhage or a ruptured fallopian tube?

    Although it was illegal for the E.R. to turn away patients who needed urgent care, hospital workers in Luling couldn’t hide their reservations. “This is not the place you want to be,” one of them told pregnant patients. “It could end up tragic.” There wouldn’t be an anesthesiologist on hand to numb the pain with an epidural, much less an expert in maternal-fetal medicine. Not every patient was in a position to travel elsewhere, however. If a pregnant woman visited the Luling E.R. three times in a row, staff came to assume that she’d end up delivering there, whether they were prepared or not.
    Great story from the New Yorker about all the consequences and side-effects of conservative policy and its consequences on this topic.

    Like the state not creating conditions to have sufficient hospitals, especially that are properly staffed and equipped for live births and complications, to actually support their "pro-life/woman/baby/whatever the fuck they're calling it now" position.

    The onus is purely on the individual, and if you're not wealthy enough to afford to travel to where there are services, especially on short notice if a complication is experienced, you're basically left to hope the local ER room can deliver the care you need or you're boned.

    This speaks more broadly to issues with availability of health care and access to coverage and how many Americans rely on the ER which has a host of consequences, and of a young woman who many have died in TX as a result of TX laws around reproductive health care and access to it.

    The wrinkle being that the young woman who died in this story was undocumented, brought over as a child, as if that should matter given the stated intent of the legislation and party policies.

    Cause of death

    Hypertensive cardiovascular disease associated with morbid obesity

    other contributing factors
    Pregnancy
    Because as the article states, which I know has greatly upset at least one poster who don't appear to like accurate and blunt descriptions of things -

    The autopsy capped more than three thousand pages of medical records chronicling the short life of Yeniifer Alvarez-Estrada Glick. None of the records from when Yeni was alive acknowledge that, given her multiple underlying conditions, an abortion would have increased her chances of survival. Only the autopsy put it plainly. “Pregnancy creates stress on the heart and can exacerbate underlying heart disease and cause hypertensive crises,” the medical examiner wrote, in naming pregnancy as a factor in Yeni’s death.
    Because yes, every pregnancy is a health risk. Even if someone is completely health, a pregnancy can introduce all kinds of health complications. And as we see in the data on maternal mortality rates in the US, it sure seems like the "pro-life/mother/baby/whatever bullshit" states fare far worse than their more liberal counterparts on this.

    So again, we have policies and outcomes that are in direct contradiction with the rhetoric from state Republicans in these states. And the consequence of that is girls and women are increasingly left to suffer and possibly die with non-viable pregnancies, or with potentially viable pregnancies that still place them at considerable personal risk.

  10. #7450
    Quote Originally Posted by Rasulis View Post
    If the poll is accurate, 62% of voters are for the amendment, 29% against, and 9% don't know of refused to answer. If you ignore the 9%, 68% are for the amendment. Well above the 60% requirement.

    Even among GOP voters, 53% are for, 39% against, and 9% undecided. Therefore, approximately 57% of GOP voters are for the amendment.
    With politics, one should never assume that anything will be easy.
    “The biggest communication problem is we do not listen to understand. We listen to reply,” Stephen Covey.

  11. #7451
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...ncy-yeni-glick



    Great story from the New Yorker about all the consequences and side-effects of conservative policy and its consequences on this topic.

    Like the state not creating conditions to have sufficient hospitals, especially that are properly staffed and equipped for live births and complications, to actually support their "pro-life/woman/baby/whatever the fuck they're calling it now" position.

    The onus is purely on the individual, and if you're not wealthy enough to afford to travel to where there are services, especially on short notice if a complication is experienced, you're basically left to hope the local ER room can deliver the care you need or you're boned.

    This speaks more broadly to issues with availability of health care and access to coverage and how many Americans rely on the ER which has a host of consequences, and of a young woman who many have died in TX as a result of TX laws around reproductive health care and access to it.

    The wrinkle being that the young woman who died in this story was undocumented, brought over as a child, as if that should matter given the stated intent of the legislation and party policies.



    Because as the article states, which I know has greatly upset at least one poster who don't appear to like accurate and blunt descriptions of things -



    Because yes, every pregnancy is a health risk. Even if someone is completely health, a pregnancy can introduce all kinds of health complications. And as we see in the data on maternal mortality rates in the US, it sure seems like the "pro-life/mother/baby/whatever bullshit" states fare far worse than their more liberal counterparts on this.

    So again, we have policies and outcomes that are in direct contradiction with the rhetoric from state Republicans in these states. And the consequence of that is girls and women are increasingly left to suffer and possibly die with non-viable pregnancies, or with potentially viable pregnancies that still place them at considerable personal risk.
    Based on North Texas Regional Extension Center 2021 Staffing Survey.

    • 185 counties in the Lone Star State with a combined population of more than 3.1 million people, equal to or greater than 21 states, have no psychiatrist.
    • 158 Texas counties with a combined population of 1.9 million, equal to or greater than 14 states, have no general surgeon.
    • 147 Texas counties with a combined population of more than 1.8 million people have no obstetrician/gynecologist.
    • 80 counties have five or fewer physicians.
    • 35 counties have no physician.

    Even if you don't live in Texas, these numbers should scare anyone who cares about rural healthcare, because this crisis is not unique to Texas, which ranks 41st among 50 states in physicians per 100,000 residents.

    "We're saying that more than 3 million people in the state of Texas don't have a psychiatrist. That is like saying Kansas doesn't have a psychiatrist. That is like saying the state of Nebraska or Montana doesn't have an OB. It's incredible," says Travis Singleton, senior vice president of Merritt Hawkins, who compiled the survey for NTREC.

    "Sometime you have to put it that way to make people understand what we face."

    "Some say you are manipulating data. Some of those counties don't have that many people and don't justify having an OB anyway. Yes, you do have a couple with 95 or 100 people. You will also have counties with 77,000 people in them without access," Singleton says.

    "It also shows you how the problem is compounded by maldistribution. The vast majority of practitioners are in Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and Austin and this shows you what a strain that puts on the rest of the state. If you are an OB and you have your choice to go anywhere in the state, why would you go to a rural county with no support?"

    Richard Howe, executive director of NTREC, says he hopes these stark numbers will open some eyes among Texas urbanites.

    "There were some surprises. Those of us in urban areas think there are plenty of physicians and we have a high number of physicians per capita in urban areas," Howe says. "But you don't have to get far out of Dallas and it jumps rural pretty quick. We didn't realize how void some of these medical specialties would be throughout the state of Texas."

    "That population with obesity, diabetes, (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and congestive heart failure is the same population, way above the averages, for individuals with needs for mental health services," Howe says. "If you don't have mental health capacity in the state, that is going to have a big impact on healthcare in general and will increase our incidences of these chronic diseases.



    Urban Shortages Too

    The physician shortage isn't just in rural Texas. Urban Texas is feeling the provider pinch within primary care. There are 375 federally designated Health Care Professional Shortage Areas in Texas with a dearth of primary care physicians and many of them are in the state's most populous counties, including Dallas, Harris, and Bexar.

    Texas ranks second in the nation in the percentage of physicians who remain in independent private practice, although more physicians in the state are turning to hospital employment, part-time practice, and concierge medicine that reduce hours and accessibility. They also are less likely to accept Medicaid and Medicare payments than physicians in other states.

    "It's not just the rural isolated counties where it is the issue," Singleton says. "You could be in downtown Dallas, depending on what kind of patient you are and what kind of provider you need, and you could have an issue. Five or 10 years ago you could look at a provider map and say are they employed or independent? Now you need to know practice patterns, who they are affiliated with, what resources do they have, are they urgent care, concierge? You just can't say they are family practitioners anymore."

  12. #7452
    Despite some telling us, "The extremists are the minority, they're going away!" we keep seeing them pop up and do things -

    https://archive.is/xaepM

    On the eve of the opening of the Florida legislative session, a Republican lawmaker filed a bill that essentially bans all abortions in Florida.

    Miami-Dade County Rep. David Borrero’s proposed bill (HB 1519), filed Monday, states that “a person or an entity may not purposely perform or attempt to perform an abortion except to save the life of a pregnant woman in a medical emergency.” The proposed bill says “a person exists from the moment of fertilization.”
    Two big problems:

    1. As has been extensively discussed, it sure seems like the "except to save the life of a pregnant woman in a medical emergency." sounds a lot like the bad language in those other states that leave women bleeding until they're on the verge of death before a hospital can perform a medically necessary abortion due to the liability and legal jeopardy it puts the hospital in. The outcome we've been seeing for well over a year is: Girls and women suffer and pay more money.

    2. If, as the bill states, a person exists "from the moment of fertilization" then the state is going to need to get WAY more involved in people sex lives to ensure that the state can accurately track when new residents are fertilized and begin treating the woman as a multi-occupancy vehicle. It opens a host of practical legal questions like, "Do pregnant women all automatically count as carpools even when driving by themselves? How does law enforcement ascertain the number of people in the vehicle if more than two are needed to qualify? Do pregnant folks need to carry ultrasounds with a doctors note? It also brings up a host of tax related questions - can they start claiming child benefits the moment the egg is fertilized? How are they even gonna find that out in time to remain in accordance with the law? Are all sexually active women going to have to submit pee tests to the state each week or something? Will they have grace periods? Can you claw back taxes paid or fees for carpool lanes if you find out you were pregnant when those fees and taxes were paid/assessed?

    His proposal includes penalties for physicians who perform abortions. It says “performing or attempting to perform an abortion” would be a third-degree felony, subject to as much as 10 years in prison or with a fine of up to $100,000, “or both.” The mothers would not be charged with a crime for obtaining an abortion.
    In which, again, this is an intentional recreation of the suffering of women in other states. Doctors and hospitals will not accept that kind of liability and Republicans would know it if they actually cared and bothered to look at the outcomes in other states. In this case, Rep. David Borrero apparently does not care at all and can't be bothered to see the outcomes in other states.

    Obviously this is very much against the general sentiment of Florida voters, and hopefully the ballot measure will pass soon protecting access to health care.

  13. #7453
    https://www.rollingstone.com/politic...ll-1234944546/

    As previously reported by Rolling Stone, Trump has privately speculated that he could run as a “moderate” on abortion, an idea that becomes laughable in the face of his record on the issue as president. The former president has also publicly voiced concerns that the GOP is shooting itself in the electoral foot by backing hardline, extremely restrictive anti-abortion policies. He didn’t seem worried on Wednesday, though, when he was asked by an undecided voter for reassurance that he would maintain his commitment to the pro-life cause if elected.

    “That is a great question, appreciate it, too,” Trump responded, adding that she “wouldn’t be asking that question, [or] even talking about the issue — for 54 years they were trying to get Roe V. Wade terminated, and I did it. and I’m proud to have done it.
    Republicans: This is truly your baby now and there's absolutely no running from it. The current frontrunner for the parties presidential candidate, y'all.

    Also for what it's worth: He didn't do shit. He just nominated groomed, trained, activist judges on lists curated by the Heritage Foundation and Federalist Society and get them rubber-stamped by a Republican Senate, including one seat that the Republican Senate held open for a year specifically hoping to fill it with a conservative activist judge.

  14. #7454
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    https://www.rollingstone.com/politic...ll-1234944546/

    Also for what it's worth: He didn't do shit. He just nominated groomed, trained, activist judges on lists curated by the Heritage Foundation and Federalist Society and get them rubber-stamped by a Republican Senate, including one seat that the Republican Senate held open for a year specifically hoping to fill it with a conservative activist judge.
    Yeah, if anyone deserves "credit" for it...it's good ol Moscow Mitch. First, by making it his #1 priority to get Conservative Judges in all the courts. And second by blocking Obama from appointing a replacement for Scalia.
    “The biggest communication problem is we do not listen to understand. We listen to reply,” Stephen Covey.

  15. #7455
    Quote Originally Posted by bladeXcrasher View Post
    He'll just deny like he did with the last lady who needed an abortion and ended up having to flee the state to get needed healthcare.
    All other issues aside, I wondered how that case had time to work it’s way thru the system if it was indeed an emergency.

  16. #7456
    The Lightbringer bladeXcrasher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by D3thray View Post
    All other issues aside, I wondered how that case had time to work it’s way thru the system if it was indeed an emergency.
    Because doctor's are refusing to make that decision...but if you really wondered you could just read a Texas Tribune article.

  17. #7457
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    https://www.rollingstone.com/politic...ll-1234944546/



    Republicans: This is truly your baby now and there's absolutely no running from it. The current frontrunner for the parties presidential candidate, y'all.

    Also for what it's worth: He didn't do shit. He just nominated groomed, trained, activist judges on lists curated by the Heritage Foundation and Federalist Society and get them rubber-stamped by a Republican Senate, including one seat that the Republican Senate held open for a year specifically hoping to fill it with a conservative activist judge.
    Never had any doubt. All GOP candidates were cut from the same cloth. Only the truly naive would believe otherwise.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by bladeXcrasher View Post
    He'll just deny like he did with the last lady who needed an abortion and ended up having to flee the state to get needed healthcare.
    Patients are not the only ones that have to go out of states. Hospitals in the Southern States are now sending their residents for their OB/Gyn rotation to California. UCSF OB/Gyn department now are full of medical residents from anti-abortion states.

  18. #7458
    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/kell...raception-2024

    [Politico reports that Conway plans to tell Republican lawmakers that the key to big wins this year is to focus less on the gutting of abortion access, and more on vocally supporting access to birth control, the logic apparently being that people will be grateful for what they can get (and too dumb to notice what they’re not getting). “You’ve got a fair number of Democrats saying that they want an alternative to [Joe] Biden and [Kamala] Harris, or they may sit it out,” Conway told Politico. “He’s especially bleeding young voters, who you would think would be animated and interested to hear about [contraception], and who are in the prime of their years and choosing to conceive or not to conceive.” Using an extremely strange analogy, Independent Women’s Voice CEO Heather Higgins told the outlet, “Republicans are like your uncle, who really loves you and loves the women in his family, but he’s bad about showing it. It’s just not in their natural vocabulary. And we’re trying to help them learn how to make this be more part of their vocabulary and tell them that they need to talk about these things that their constituents all support, and be more visible and vocal.”
    First off, I'm not sure, "Our party took away protections for abortion access, but we haven't taken away access to contraceptives yet!" is the slogan she thinks it is.

    Also I'm unsure about how comparing the Republican party to your creepy uncle who keeps getting handsy with all his nieces and shit is a good thing?

    Man, it's no wonder that younger folks and women keep fleeing the Republican party.

  19. #7459
    Republicans voicing strong support of birth control will not happen.
    "We must make our choice. We may have democracy, or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both."
    -Louis Brandeis

  20. #7460
    Quote Originally Posted by Edge- View Post
    Heather Higgins told the outlet, “Republicans are like your uncle, who really loves you and loves the women in his family, but he’s bad about showing it.
    ...more like your uncle who beats his wife and kids, saying "this hurts me more than it hurts you" while he's doing it.

    But good luck securing that youth vote, when Republicans are so much worse on all the actual reasons they're turning against Biden. Idiots.

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