1. #1
    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    Post World Bee Day - May 20th, to bee or not to bee?

    World Bee Day - Opportunity to Discuss the Challenges of Bee Preservation and Activities for their Survival.

    https://www.novinite.com/articles/21...their+Survival
    Society » ENVIRONMENT | May 17, 2022, Tuesday // 10:16

    On 20 May, Slovenia and the rest of the world will celebrate World Bee Day for the fifth time. The UN General Assembly proclaimed World Bee Day on 20 December 2017. Since 2022 is the European Year of Youth, the main topic of this year's celebration are young people and beekeeping. The main purpose of World Bee Day is to raise awareness among the international public about the importance of bees and other pollinators for humanity in the light of food security, the global elimination of hunger and care for the environment and biodiversity.

    World Bee Day highlights the importance of bees and other pollinators for sustainable agriculture, global food supply and hunger elimination. Every third spoonful of food depends on pollination. By pollinating crops, bees are an important source of jobs and farmers' income, in particular as regards small and family farms in developing countries. They also play an important role in preserving nature and biodiversity. It is vital to protect pollinators, which are threatened by human activities, in particular intensive farming, the wide use of pesticides and pollution caused by waste. Bees are exposed to new diseases and pests. The bees' habitat is shrinking due to the growing world population. Their survival and development are increasingly threatened by climate change.

    In 2016, after disseminating information to countries, institutions and the general public for one year, Slovenia – on the initiative of the Slovenian Beekeepers’ Association – initiated procedures in the UN to declare World Bee Day. The first phase of official procedures took place in the working bodies of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Rome, while the final phase took place in the competent committee at the UN General Assembly in New York. Both institutions adopted a resolution, which received the general support of participating countries, emphasising the importance of bees and other pollinators for sustainable development and the preservation of the planet for future generations. The aim of the initiative is to draw the attention of the international public to the importance of bee and pollinator conservation, highlight the importance of bees for agriculture, the environment and the entire humanity, and call for specific activities for their preservation.

    Slovenia proposed the celebration of World Bee Day in the month of May for a number of reasons. It is when bees in the northern hemisphere are most active and begin to reproduce. This is also the period in which the need for pollination is greatest. In the southern hemisphere it is autumn, a time for harvesting bee products, marking the days and weeks of honey. In addition, 20 May is the birth date of Anton Janša, who is considered a pioneer of modern beekeeping and one of the greatest experts in this field of his time.

    The promotion of World Bee Day contributes to the global visibility of Slovenia and Slovenian beekeeping. This provides opportunities for further development and expansion to international markets in numerous fields. One of them is definitely to market beekeeping knowledge and skills. Further development is possible as regards the offer of Slovenian beekeeping equipment, the export of bee products with a higher added value and the like. World Bee Day is also an opportunity for other branches of the economy, including tourism, trade and the hospitality industry, and for the general promotion of Slovenia globally.

    Beekeeping in Slovenia

    We are fortunate in Slovenia to have suitable natural conditions and a very rich knowledge, tradition and experience passed on by our beekeepers, enabling everybody to get familiar with bees and become beekeepers.

    Not only that Slovenia initiated World Bee Day, it has also long been recognised as a country of beekeeping. Anton Janša (1734–1773), the first teacher of beekeeping in imperial Vienna, spread the knowledge of small Slovenian farmers and beekeepers across the world already 230 years ago. Hundred of years later, the area became famous for its Apis mellifera carnica honeybee, which soon became known throughout the world.

    Beekeeping also left its mark in folk art. Painted beehive panels are part of the Slovenian cultural heritage. As one of the chapters of folk art, which was mostly created by and for representatives of lower social strata or peasants, painted beehive panels appeared in the Slovenian ethnic area in the second half of the 18th century. The most common beehive in Slovenia is the AŽ hive named after beekeepers Alberti and Žnideršič. Bee houses characterise the architecture of rural built heritage in Slovenia and enrich the cultural image of the Slovenian landscape even today.

    Slovenia is known for training young beekeepers. Young people in beekeeping are at the heart of this year's celebration of World Bee Day. Young beekeepers in Slovenia receive their training also in beekeeping societies. This is a long-standing tradition in Slovenia. Beekeeping societies became popular in the 1960s and the first national competition of young beekeepers was held in 1977. While beekeeping societies function on a voluntary basis, the funds of the public advisory service in beekeeping have been used since 2008 to support their activities in primary and secondary schools. There were 119 beekeeping societies in Slovenia in 2021 with 1491 young members. Their primary aim is to educate children about the importance of beekeeping and the ecosystem role of bees. Children acquire a positive attitude towards the environment and the preservation of bees by getting to know bee products and their advantages. Many children who belong to these societies later decide to become beekeepers. In the coming year, Slovenia will host the International Competition for Young Beekeepers.

    For further information, please visit:

    The website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food – World Bee Day
    https://www.gov.si/en/registries/pro...world-bee-day/

    World Bee Day on FAO website
    https://www.fao.org/world-bee-day/en/


    @Bees4Peace Foundation, Facebook



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    I hope this day catches on, I like bees, especially bumblebees they are my homies, I even learned to like wasps

    I got an insect home, I got as a present, does anyone know if this is useful, will it attract bees? or just lots of insects that will annoy me? Does that make it fly in more insects into my apartment?


  2. #2
    Elemental Lord Slacker76's Avatar
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    Ugh is this a post, or just Press Release spam?

    Reminder, bees love sunflowers. Spread more sunflower seeds for bees, and freedom.



    Put seeds in pockets.


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    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    I'm not chicken drummer, if that's what you mean?

    I like bees, my uncle had many hives, I remember as a kid chewy honey cakes, not bad quality that falls apart, the kind you can chew like chewing gum, that was awesome.

    Those hives were old fashioned, didn't know they look like this today, I hope that's glass and not plastic..
    Relaxing video though


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    Quote Originally Posted by Slacker76 View Post
    Reminder, bees love sunflowers. Spread more sunflower seeds for bees, and freedom.
    Unless you are a farmer, no? There are lots of plants you can plant that attracts bees, you can put some in your balcony, which I will.
    Last edited by Ihavewaffles; 2022-05-18 at 05:25 PM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ihavewaffles View Post
    I'm not chicken drummer, if that's what you mean?

    I like bees, my uncle had many hives, I remember as a kid chewy honey cakes, not bad quality that falls apart, the kind you can chew like chewing gum, that was awesome.

    Those hives were old fashioned, didn't know they look like this today, I hope that's glass and not plastic..
    Relaxing video though


    - - - Updated - - -



    Unless you are a farmer, no? There are lots of plants you can plant that attracts bees, you can put some in your balcony, which I will.
    Drummer doesn’t do press releases, just data collection prompts. And I think you missed the Ukraine reference. Also pretty sure the flow hives are all plastic.

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    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    I didn't miss it, I'm not interested in him wanting to derail the thread, he can talk to himself if he doesn't want to focus on bees n honey..

    They are called flow hives? All plastic, oh I don't like that...

    I wonder if modern hives better protect the bees from hornets, especially those big orange ones from Japan..
    Should be simple enough? Those hornets are really big, just make it so they can't squish through, but then you get a bad in and out flow of bees on a normal day, if they have to stand in line?

    I hope they have fixed the issue..
    Last edited by Ihavewaffles; 2022-05-18 at 05:30 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ihavewaffles View Post
    I didn't miss it, I'm not interested in him wanting to derail the thread, he can talk to himself if he doesn't want to focus on bees n honey..

    They are called flow hives? All plastic, oh I don't like that...

    I wonder if modern hives better protect the bees from hornets, especially those big orange ones from Japan..
    Should be simple enough? Those hornets are really big, just make it so they can't squish through, but then you get a bad in and out flow of bees on a normal day, if they have to stand in line?

    I hope they have fixed the issue..
    It’s literally the title of the video you linked… as for the rest, go read an apiarist blog.

  7. #7
    I learned awhile ago that too much focus on honey bees and need to help native wild bees such as the mason and leaf cutter bee's. I think this is the right vid but talks about how they are much more productive pollinators than your honey bee. Of course they don't produce honey and generally don't sting. I built a few nests into my building and enjoy them very much.




    Also a vid on solitary bee.
    “There is a cult of ignorance in the United States…. [It is] nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that ‘my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.’”

    -Isaac Asimov

  8. #8
    Elemental Lord Slacker76's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ihavewaffles View Post
    Unless you are a farmer, no? There are lots of plants you can plant that attracts bees, you can put some in your balcony, which I will.
    Why yes, I am a farmer. Bees are essential to my crops, so I plant flowers specifically to nourish bees when my primary crops are not in blossom. I work with a local apiarist to provide the bees with plenty of food and habitat. Sunflowers are one of the top providers of nectar for bees. Especially in their native North America.

    We also leave the honey. It's less disturbance for the colony and more food for the bees if they need it.

    Local apiarists are your best resources for learning about bees.

  9. #9
    Titan Orby's Avatar
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    I like Bee's unlike those pesky Wasps
    Proof is boring. Proof is tiresome. Proof is irrelevance. People would rather be handed an easy lie than search for a difficult truth, especially when it suits their own purpose.
    - Glokta
    The Last Argument of Kings, The First Law Trilogy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orby View Post
    I like Bee's unlike those pesky Wasps
    Wasps are pretty chill, they just hover around looking for snacks. If they got plenty to eats, they are as docile as bumblebees.

    Things may change if their nest is where u live, but in general they just hover around..

  11. #11
    Titan Orby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ihavewaffles View Post
    Wasps are pretty chill, they just hover around looking for snacks. If they got plenty to eats, they are as docile as bumblebees.

    Things may change if their nest is where u live, but in general they just hover around..
    From my experience Wasps go looking for fights and taunt you, bees mind their own business ('beesness', sorry) when they fly around. Never had any trouble with bees. Also bees are cuter too lol. I just really hate wasps lol
    Proof is boring. Proof is tiresome. Proof is irrelevance. People would rather be handed an easy lie than search for a difficult truth, especially when it suits their own purpose.
    - Glokta
    The Last Argument of Kings, The First Law Trilogy.

  12. #12
    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orby View Post
    From my experience Wasps go looking for fights and taunt you, bees mind their own business ('beesness', sorry) when they fly around. Never had any trouble with bees. Also bees are cuter too lol. I just really hate wasps lol
    I like bumblebees, but I'm fascinated by wasps, they look like something Skynet would produce...

  13. #13
    Honeybees are a light brown and yellow. Bumblebees are black and tan. Fairly tame, nonagressive.
    Black and yellow and I'm reaching for a flamethrower. Wasps and hornets...once in the warehouse I was working in, we opened up a crate from Mexico and saw..it looked like a dead desiccated giant wasp. NOBODY went near it. We all said the same thing; "two stings from that and we'd be dead."

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    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowferal View Post
    Honeybees are a light brown and yellow. Bumblebees are black and tan. Fairly tame, nonagressive.
    Just don't mess with bumblebee nests n they are cool as a cucumber, for some reason the larger the nest the more aggressive they are in defending it..



    Black and yellow and I'm reaching for a flamethrower. Wasps and hornets...once in the warehouse I was working in, we opened up a crate from Mexico and saw..it looked like a dead desiccated giant wasp. NOBODY went near it. We all said the same thing; "two stings from that and we'd be dead."
    Did it look like this?


  15. #15
    It was greenish, but that could've been because it was so dried out. It was near the size of a female praying mantis. Something I've never had an issue with. I've had mantids crawling on me before...friendly enough.

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    Scarab Lord Ihavewaffles's Avatar
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    oh....mantids give me the creeps...

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